Refugee Resettlement Watch

Archive for the ‘Christian refugees’ Category

Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society launches petition drive to increase this year’s refugee quota from 70,000-100,000

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 29, 2014

We want 75,000 Syrians admitted to US in next five years.

Citing the crisis in Syria and Iraq, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, one of nine major federal contractors has launched a drive to petition the Obama Administration to increase the Fiscal Year 2015 admissions to the US.

Always keep in mind that the contractors are paid by the head to resettle refugees to your towns and cities.

See a previous post this morning for what all this is costing you.

Readers will remember it was Nezer who earlier this year said we should take 75,000 Syrians over 5 years.

Although she says they are trying to save Christians and religious minorities, interested readers should call them and ask how many Muslims they resettled in recent years and ask what percentage of the Syrians in the pipeline for America right now are Muslims.

From an e-mail alert this morning:

Dear Friend,

10.14---HIAS_SyriaIraq_callout_v4.pngThe conflict in Syria has forced more than 3 million people from their homes. In Iraq, the Islamic State has engaged in an ethnic cleansing campaign against Christians and other ethnic and religious minorities. Those who have fled will likely never be able to return home.

Yet, despite ongoing persecution and conflicts creating more and more refugees, the United States has not increased the quota of people we will resettle in the coming year.

Sign our petition! It is imperative that the annual US refugee quota be increased from 70,000 to 100,000. 

Raising the resettlement ceiling will not put an end to the violence sweeping Syria and Iraq. But it will allow us to save more of the most vulnerable refugees of this unimaginable suffering. It will support the countries hosting them. And it will uphold our nation’s promise to support religious freedom and provide safe haven to those who are persecuted.

Stand with us and urge President Obama to uphold our nation’s promise to support religious freedom and offer safe haven to those who are persecuted for their faith and beliefs.

Sincerely,
Melanie

Melanie Nezer
Vice President, Policy and Advocacy

Posted in Changing the way we live, Christian refugees, Iraqi refugees, Muslim refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Taxpayer goodies, The Opposition | Tagged: , | 3 Comments »

Will the thousands of Syrian refugees now being admitted to the US be Christians?

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 4, 2014

That is a question I get all the time.  My best guess is that a few will be, but the vast majority will be Sunni Muslims.

My guess is based on a few facts from the past, first that of the Iraqi refugees we have resettled in recent years, the majority (we hear 62% this past year) are Muslims, and secondly, I have never seen in print any clamor from our major refugee resettlement contractors***, most of which are ostensibly Christian groups (US Conference of Catholic Bishops, Lutheran Immigration and Refugee service and others), for specifically saving the Christians of the Middle East.

Now outdated map (thanks to ISIS), but it gives you some idea of the areas that were Christian. See this article about Christians fighting with Assad against the “rebels.” http://thechristians.com/?q=node/880

Maybe someone could direct me to anything where these contractors said to the US State Department—we want more Christians to resettle!  My guess as to why they haven’t said that (correct me if I’m wrong and they have) is because of an overwhelming and insane desire to be politically correct and a fear of being called Islamophobes.

(Oh, and believe me, they aren’t taking mostly Muslims because they think they can convert them to Christianity, this is all about multiculturalism, diversity and inclusiveness!)

A writer (Terry Mattingly) at a website called ‘GetReligion’ addressed his question—how are refugees being chosen?—in response to the Washington Post article of this past week (our post here) where the WaPo tells us the State Department is processing 4,000 resettlement applications.

Mattingly found more evidence that most will be Muslims.

He says that since they will come from UN camps (after all the UN is pre-selecting for the US State Department), and the Christians are not in camps, surely the majority will be Muslims.  As a matter of fact, I’ve read that many Christians are still in Syria somewhat protected by the secular Assad government.

Here is ‘GetReligion:’

First, the WaPo said this:

Most Syrian refugees considered candidates for U.S. residency have been living in refugee camps or elsewhere outside Syria for a year or much longer.

And then this from Terry Mattingly (emphasis is mine):

This leads to a logical question: Who is, when push comes to shove, running these UNHCR camps? In particular, I was curious to know how this selection system would affect the cases of refugees who are part of oppressed religious minority groups. I decided to ask a veteran human-rights activist about that.

The response? Christians on the run have been avoiding these camps because they tend to be hostile to minority-faith refugees. In other words, these camps are run by those in majority forms of Islam, even if they have – logically enough – clashed with the radicalized Islamic State.

In other words, we have a major religion ghost in this story. It is likely that the current pipeline to safety is all but closed to Christians and members of other minority faiths in this ravaged region.

Read it all.

***The US State Department’s nine major contractors (they have hundreds of subcontractors working for them if you don’t recognize these names in your cities):

Posted in Changing the way we live, Christian refugees, Community destabilization, Iraqi refugees, Muslim refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Who is going where | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Austin, MN: Meatpackers changing the demographics of American towns

Posted by Ann Corcoran on September 15, 2014

There is nothing earth-shattering in this article from MPR News, but it’s just further evidence of the role the meatpacking industry is playing in changing towns in America’s heartland with its avaricious desire for cheap labor—refugee labor!  (Remember Senator Sessions called the meatpackers out here last year as a driving force behind amnesty).

We have been following this topic for going on seven years first brought to our attention by the turmoil created by Somali workers demanding workplace accommodation for their ‘religious’ requirements.  We have an entire category entitled, Greeley/Swift/Somali controversy, where we archived posts on the topic.

But, you know what is really funny (sort of) is that the meatpackers apparently got sick of the Somali workers in some places and must have asked the US State Department (and their contractors***) for some more docile workers like these Burmese Karen Christians or the mostly Hindu Bhutanese refugees we have been bringing in ever since Bush “welcomed” them in 2007.

The refugees are basically cheap, legal, captive laborers which you subsidize through the myriad social services they receive (see our fact sheet for the list of welfare programs open to refugees).

 

The largest employer in Austin, MN, Hormel and Quality Pork. Photo from a NYT article in 2008 about a mystery illness there. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/05/health/05pork.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

 

From MPR News (hat tip: Deb):

St. Paul is home to the largest Karen population in the country. But in recent years, Austin has attracted hundreds of the Karen and Karenni people.

Austin, a meatpacking town that has seen big demographic changes in the last few decades, started attracting workers from Mexico and Latin America in the early 1990s, followed by a wave of African immigrants. [The meatpackers used illegal labor from south of the border until the feds clamped down and then they discovered refugee labor thanks to Bill Clinton---ed]

The city’s growing Karen population is the first influx of minorities that has not been Latino or African, and the change has come fast.

According to the city’s Welcome Center, the number of Karen and Karenni residents in Austin nearly tripled to 1,224 this year, up from 463 in 2012. Driven out of their long-adopted home of Myanmar to camps in Thailand, the members of the two groups are flowing to the United States as refugees.

That means they can work legally, and some have replaced other immigrants at workplaces like Austin’s Hormel and Quality Pork processing plants, Austin schools superintendent David Krenz said.

Of course this massive plant in Austin would not have had Somali workers in the first place!  (Pork of course!).

The Minnesota resettlement agencies affiliated with the federal government are listed here.  They are subcontractors of the big Volags below.  BTW, they call themselves Voluntary Agencies (Volags), but that is an obvious misnomer as most are nearly completely funded by tax dollars.

***The federal migrant resettlement contractors which we have followed for years (Grant recipient big dogs (devouring federal cash) Baptist Child and Family Services and Southwest Key Programs  are new on the scene in recent years and mostly due to UACs.):

Posted in Changing the way we live, Christian refugees, Community destabilization, Greeley/Swift/Somali controversy, Legal immigration and jobs, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Taxpayer goodies, Who is going where | Tagged: , , , | 2 Comments »

How many Iraqi refugees came to America since 9/11? How are they doing?

Posted by Ann Corcoran on September 13, 2014

In our earlier post this morning, we reported that the US State Department is going to begin bringing in Syrians (at the UN’s direction) on par with what we have done for Iraqis.  That reminded me that I wanted to pull together the Iraqi resettlement data.

We are on our way, as this fiscal year ends in a few weeks, to 115,000 Iraqis admitted to the US since 9/11.  Approximately 62% are Muslims (71,300).  How do we know?

Recently a reader sent me some numbers for Iraqi refugees from a data base kept by the US State Department that only select people have access to.  It was the data base of religions refugees bring to America.  Our reader said that of 111,854 Iraqis admitted since 2003, 42,137 are Christians. (38%).   I don’t have access to the religion data, but I did want to check the total numbers for myself.

I don’t come up with 111,854 (I get 111,731, but it’s close and we could easily reach 115,000 by the end of the fiscal year).  This information below comes from data tables at the end of Annual Reports to Congress, here.

Iraqi refugees who were ultimately convicted on terrorism charges were arrested in KY and caused a dip in the numbers for 2011.

From 1983-2002:  we resettled 41,549 Iraqis

From fiscal year 2003 to August 31, 2014:

2003:  294

2004:  65

2005:  186

2006:  189

2007:  1,605

2008:  13,775 (this was a George Bush year)

2009:  18,709

2010:  18,016

2011:  9,388  (Assume this dip is because of the Iraqi terrorists arrested in KY which resulted in a federal freak-out and a re-do on the security screening of Iraqis).

2012:  12,233

2013:  19,500

2014 (11 months of the fiscal year): 17,771

Bottom line is that we are approaching 115,000 Iraqis admitted to the US in the last 12 years (the State Dept. and contractors will make a big push this month to hit their targets and so I am guessing they will reach 115,000).

How are they doing? 

See the special section on Iraqi refugees in the 2012 ORR Annual Report to Congress (the most recent data available) beginning on page 110.

Not so hot!

~The overall US unemployment rate that year was 7.6%, the Iraqi unemployment rate was 22.6% (but up from 40% or so in some previous years).

~Of those not looking for work, 33.6% had poor health or disabilities.

~The average hourly wage for Iraqis who were working was $9.79 per hour.

~ORR says that the goal is self-sufficiency in 3 months, but only 21% got their first job in 6 months and welfare continued.

~60% were on Medicaid or Refugee Medical Assistance.

~82% were receiving food stamps.

~58% were receiving some sort of cash assistance.

~36% were getting SSI (Supplemental Security Income).

The report tries to put a happy face on it, but the numbers are abysmal!

Sure looks like we are importing poverty and you can expect the Syrians to be in the same situation when they begin arriving at rates comparable to the Iraqis—from 10,000-20,000 a year!

For ambitious readers, our Iraqi refugee category has 628 previous posts in it.

Update:  About the photo.  The photo we placed in this post this morning disappeared. This is not the first time, that has happened with the official photo of this pair.  Let’s see what happens with this one.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Christian refugees, Iraqi refugees, Legal immigration and jobs, Muslim refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Taxpayer goodies, Where to find information | Tagged: , , | 3 Comments »

14 million refugees in the Middle East: utter disaster

Posted by Judy K. Warner on September 9, 2014

The brilliant and knowledgeable David P. Goldman writes in PJ Media:

There are always lunatics lurking in the crevices of Muslim politics prepared to proclaim a new Caliphate; there isn’t always a recruiting pool in the form of nearly 14 million displaced people (11 million Syrians, or half the country’s population, and 2.8 million Iraqis, or a tenth of the country’s population)….Many of them will have nothing to go back to. When people have nothing to lose, they fight to the death and inflict horrors on others. That is what civilizational decline looks like in real time.

Goldman has been predicting this kind of disaster in the Middle East for years.  He also writes under the pen name of Spengler after Oswald Spengler, a German historian who is best known for his book, Decline of the West.  Goldman continues:

The Arab states are failed states, except for the few with enough hydrocarbons to subsidize every facet of economic life. Egypt lives on a$15 billion annual subsidy from the Gulf states, and if that persists, will remain stable if not quite prosperous. Syria is a ruin, along with large parts of Iraq. The lives of tens of millions of people were fragile before the fighting broke out (30% of Syrians lived on less than $1.60 a day), and now they are utterly ruined. The hordes of combatants displace more people, and these join the hordes, in a snowball effect. That’s what drove the 30 Years War of 1618-1648, and that’s what’s driving the war in the Levant.

There’s a lot to be said about what we should do about ISIS and the other terrorist groups militarily, and it is being said. Here at RRW I’m wondering whether the State Department thinks 14 million refugees with nothing to go back to, rootless and dispossessed and many filled with a destructive rage beyond our comprehension, are our responsibility, a great pool of potential United States citizens.  I’m wondering if the resettlement agencies see a potential windfall and meat packers see cheap labor without end.  God help us if so. Ann has written extensively about Syrian refugees and the pressures on other countries to take them. I’m sorry, but you can’t place 11 million Syrians and 3 million Iraquis in western countries.

If there were anyone in the government looking after America’s interests, we would recognize that this catastrophe is not something we can fix.  If we’re going to help, we should be looking only to Christians and other selected religious minorities.  I wish we had the will and the strength to find them a piece of land of their own over there, but that’s a fantasy.  Goldman writes:

When I wrote in 2011 that Islam was dying, this was precisely what I forecast. You can’t unscramble this egg. The international organizations, Bill Clinton, George Soros and other people of that ilk will draw up plans, propose funding, hold conferences and publish studies, to no avail. The raw despair of millions of people ripped out of the cocoon of traditional society, bereft of ties of kinship and custom, will feed the meatgrinder. Terrorist organizations that were hitherto less flamboyant (“moderate” is a misdesignation), e.g. the Muslim Brotherhood (and its Palestine branch Hamas) will compete with the Caliphate for the loyalties of enraged young people. The delusion about Muslim democracy that afflicted utopians of both parties is now inoperative. War will end when the pool of prospective fighters has been exhausted.

Posted in Christian refugees, Iraqi refugees, Muslim refugees, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

Australia may take 4,000 Christian Iraqi and Syrian refugees

Posted by Ann Corcoran on August 14, 2014

The Abbott government, which is constantly beaten-up by those who want Australia to take in the world, is considering resettling persecuted Christians, but that isn’t enough for the no-borders pushers.

From the Sydney Morning Herald:

The Abbott government is considering offering refuge to as many as 4000 Iraqis and Syrians after the new Anglican Primate of Australia, Philip Freier, called for asylum in Australia for Christians facing slaughter in northern Iraq.

Dr Freier, Anglican Archbishop of Melbourne, said he had written to Prime Minister Tony Abbott and Immigration Minister Scott Morrison asking that they emulate France in offering refuge to Christians facing forced conversion to Islam or death.

By the way, has anyone seen anything from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops, the Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service or any of the other US “religious” resettlement contractors saying we should be taking CHRISTIANS into the US now?  Or, are they so politically-correct and fearful of saying anything against Islam that they keep their mouths shut?

(New readers of RRW probably don’t know that Catholics and Lutherans are responsible for much of the Muslim refugee resettlement happening in the US right now.)

Adam Bandt wants to know why Abbott treats those in detention differently than persecuted Christians from Iraq. Could it be that those in detention have broken the law and won’t make good citizens.

Greens call out Abbott

The text of the Sydney Morning Herald story does not include anything from the Green Party, but there is a clip of Green Party leader Adam Bandt criticizing Tony Abbott for what he calls hypocrisy because while perhaps agreeing to take 4,000 refugees now, the government is holding hundreds of Iraqis in detention.  He wonders why the disparity in treatment.

It is pretty obvious to me!   Those in detention are mostly Muslims who broke into Australia illegally—not persecuted Christians running for their lives at the moment.

Here is the caption under the film clip:

PM needs to decide if he’s a humanitarian or a hypocrite: Greens

Granting extra places to refugees fleeing Iraq is a good start, but it would be hypocritical of the government to send refugees already in detention back to Iraq says Adam Bandt.

See all of our coverage of the migrant problem in Australia by clicking here (141 previous posts!).  See especially Australia’s Muslim migrants call for Caliphate.  What does Bandt not see about the difference between Muslims and Christians as prospective new Aussies?

Posted in Australia, Christian refugees, Iraqi refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Who is going where | Tagged: , , , | 2 Comments »

Austria to take 1,000 Syrians

Posted by Ann Corcoran on April 23, 2014

That number seems rather high to me and I sure hope they aren’t passing through Austria to the US as some Muslim refugees have done this past year.    See our earlier post on Austria, here.

A reader explained to me privately at that time that we were using Austria as a conduit for “refugees” on the way to America.

‘Asylum seekers’ protesting in Vienna in 2012. They were demanding better living conditions.

From novinite.com:   But, check this out, the Austrians actually have the courage to say they are focusing their attention on persecuted Christians!

Austria will receive an extra 1000 Syrian refugees in addition to the quota of 500 announced in August 2013, according to Interior Minister Johanna Mikl-Leitner.

In a Sunday interview for Austrian newspaper Kurier, she explained that the country would receive an additional 1000 refugees apart from the initially announced quota of 500, adding that priority treatment would be granted to women, children and persecuted Christians. She said that the number of asylum applicants had not been taken into account in the measure.

Austria has been swamped by Muslim asylum seekers, see our earlier posts on a country that repelled the invaders at the Gates of Vienna in 1683.

Posted in Asylum seekers, Christian refugees, Europe, Muslim refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Who is going where | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

Abrams and Schwartz want further relaxation of security screening for Syrian refugees

Posted by Ann Corcoran on April 3, 2014

In a highly criticized move, the Obama Administration already relaxed security screening aimed at bringing in thousands of Syrians.  Now Elliott Abrams and Eric Schwartz have penned an op-ed saying it wasn’t enough.

Elliott Abrams

Frankly, some serious wrangling must be going on within the Administration because as far as I can tell, Obama has not YET opened the floodgates to Syrian refugees and thus we are seeing the public relations push—as we mentioned in the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society story the other day.  (Incidentally, that story was viewed by 33,328 readers via our facebook page!)

Who are Abrams and Schwartz?   According to the USA Today op-ed:

Elliott Abrams, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, was a deputy national security adviser in the George W. Bush administration. Eric P. Schwartz, dean of the Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota, was assistant secretary of State for population, refugees and migration in the Obama administration. They are members of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom.

We have a lot on Eric P. Schwartz, a Soros protege and one-worlder, on our pages, here.

Eric P. Schwartz

Abrams and Schwartz at USA Today:

Last month, as Syria’s civil war entered its fourth year, bloodshed continued without pause and the number of refugees continued to swell. Those are among the reasons that the Obama administration took an important step to sustain a U.S. tradition of protecting refugees, including Syrians fleeing their country. But the administration can do more.

The United States has long provided haven and resettlement to those escaping tyranny.

They then go on to describe the waiver from terrorism bars the Obama Administration has already put in place and say it isn’t enough:

There are other categories of refugees who still fall afoul of current law, such as former combatants who never acted against U.S. interests and have laid down their arms, and individuals who provided “insignificant” support for groups that the U.S. has designated as terrorist groups. The administration should consider expanding its waiver to include these groups.

Abrams and Schwartz say they only want a few thousand Syrians to be admitted, but therein lies the rub.  The US State Department had bandied about the possible resettlement of 2,000 this fiscal year, but the resettlement contractors are pushing for from 12,000-15,000 this year (to be repeated again next year and the year after…).

BTW, we are already 6 months into the 2014 fiscal year which began on Oct. 1, 2013.  And, just a reminder: the contractors are paid by the head for each refugee they resettle.

In case you are wondering, Abrams and Schwartz never mention the persecuted Syrian Christians.

This is how you snooker the low-information Americans who read USA Today:

We are not suggesting that the United States admit waves of new refugees. While there are more than 2 million Syrians outside their homeland, the U.S. resettlement program for Syrians is focused only on several thousand of the most vulnerable.

LOL! It is only a few thousand and only the “vulnerable” they say.  What is “several thousand?”

As I said the contractors and the open borders lobby must be running into some resistance on the Syrian refugee resettlement issue or Abrams and Schwartz wouldn’t be penning this piece.

Just as Americans are weary of war, I believe they are weary of taking in the world and putting the masses on US taxpayer-funded welfare, not to mention putting our security at risk!

You need to be letting your Representative in Congress or US Senators know, you have had enough!

Posted in Changing the way we live, Christian refugees, Muslim refugees, Obama, Refugee Resettlement Program, Taxpayer goodies, The Opposition | Tagged: , | 7 Comments »

My favorite refugees, German homeschoolers, get asylum

Posted by Judy K. Warner on March 13, 2014

Uwe and Hannelore Romeike and their children left their native Germany in 2008, fleeing persecution by the government because they wanted to homeschool their children.   Lynda Altman reports in the Examiner

The family applied for asylum based on religious persecution. Asylum was granted. However, the Obama administration overturned that decision and the Romeike family faced deportation.

HSLDA stepped in and fought the deportation. They lost the battle at every turn. Even when Glenn Beck stepped in with a sizable donation, the family still could not catch a break in court. Then, a petition was filed with thousands of signatures requesting that the U.S. Government answer a final request. On that, the family won.

The Romeike family. Six and counting.

The U.S. Supreme Court was supposed to hear the case on Monday, March 3, 2014. Instead of hearing the case, the court decided against it. That left the Romeike family with no more options. They were out of time and legal recourse. It looked like deportation was inevitable.

After public outcry, the Department of Homeland Security gave the Romeike family permission to remain in the United States. This happened on Tuesday, March 4, 2014.

Blogger Ben Swann has these further details (as well as some details about what happened to them in Germany):

The Romeike’s received help from the Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA). The HSLDA requested a rehearing with the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals. The request was denied. The case caught the attention of the homeschooling community, as well as a number of Christian groups. An online petition asking President Obama to grant the family asylum was signed by more than 127,000 people. Eventually the Romeike’s and the HSLDA decided to request a hearing with the Supreme Court.

Michael Farris, founder of the HSLDA, commented, “The Attorney General and Sixth Circuit are ignoring critical evidence and are trying to send back this family who is trying to stay in our country legally. We are hopeful that the Supreme Court will go the other way and see what the original immigration judge saw: that this family and other religious homeschoolers in Germany are being persecuted for what they believe is the right way to raise their children.”

Both writers give the petition and public outcry credit for the outcome.  I wonder; I’ve never heard of a petition to the federal government having any effect.  It’s great if that’s true.  I do remember that more than 20 years ago Rep. George Miller of California introduced a bill in Congress that homeschoolers interpreted as threatening to their right to educate their children.  (I should say “we homeschoolers” as I was one at the time.)  They jammed the Capitol switchboard — it was reported to be the most calls ever — and the bill was withdrawn.  Today there are many more homeschoolers.

I posted on the case here in 2010 and Ann posted here in 2013 when the Romeikes were denied asylum.  Note that they were initially granted asylum and then that was overturned at the federal level.  We can imagine how much the Obama administration would love a Christian family educating its children outside the state’s control. (Not!)  I’d love to know the inside story of the judicial and government actions in this case.

As Ann commented in her post when the Romeikes lost their asylum case: We will take Chechens, Somalis and Rohingya Muslims, but not persecuted Christians from Germany who pose no threat to America.  Go figure!

Addendum: Here a great piece by Michael Farris, Dangerous Policy Lurks behind Romeike Triumph.  I don’t have time to write about it, but if you are interested in homeschooling, parental rights, religious freedom, or oppressive government, there’s a lot here for you.

Posted in Asylum seekers, Christian refugees, Other refugees | Tagged: , , , , | 7 Comments »

Thousands of Syrian Muslim refugees becoming Christians?

Posted by Ann Corcoran on February 3, 2014

Here is the report I saw first at Catholic Culture:

Christian Aid Mission, a Protestant organization based in Virginia, is reporting that thousands of Syrian refugees are converting to Christianity in Turkey, Lebanon, and Iraq.

“Literally thousands of Syrians from traditional Muslim backgrounds are turning to Jesus Christ,” the organization stated. “It’s not an inflating of the numbers, nor is it an optimistic estimate.”

And, here is the full story at Christian Aid Mission, let’s hope their conversion is legitimate.  Christian groups like this one—doing the hard work around the world rather than advocating for the third world to come to America—are to be encouraged in my view.

For new readers, those advocating (lobbying!) to bring the third world here are the federal refugee contractors representing some mainstream churches in America.

Posted in Christian refugees, Muslim refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program | Tagged: | 3 Comments »

 
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