Refugee Resettlement Watch

Archive for the ‘Where to find information’ Category

Iraqis top list of refugees resettled in first 2 months of fiscal year; Texas top resettlement state

Posted by Ann Corcoran on December 9, 2014

Two months of fiscal year 2015 are now behind us and the US State Department and its contractors are off and running with a surprising number of refugees resettled so far.

These were the top 5 states in FY2014. Right now Arizona is edging out Florida and Michigan has moved to number 3.

According to the statistics kept at the Refugee Processing Center, Iraqis top the list.  Here are the Top Five countries of origin for refugees arriving in the US in October and November 2014 (the 2015 fiscal year began Oct. 1):

Iraqis:  3,367

Burmese:  2,530

Somalis:  1,856

Congolese:  1,004

Bhutanese:  870

The Syrian push is not on yet we see. Only 112 have come so far this year.

We then checked out any state that received more than 400 refugees in two months (which is a lot when supplying them with their welfare needs), and here they are:

Texas:   1,386

California:  997

Michigan:  585

New York:  584

Arizona:  564

Florida:  530

Washington:  529

Ohio:  514

Illinois:  475

Minnesota:  435

Georgia: 435

North Carolina:  434

Pennsylvania:  433

If you are wondering which nationalities have arrived in your state, you are out of luck because the State Department has removed the data base that tells us that.  Instead they have a completely useless data base that only tells us the ‘processing country’ from which your state’s refugees arrived.

Well, maybe I shouldn’t call it completely useless because it does give us some bits of information to ponder. For example, we learn that we took another 116 of Malta’s illegal aliens off their hands (probably Somalis).   466 came to the US from South Africa (the safe Rainbow Nation country), so who were they?  I noticed a bunch (79) of those South African “refugees” went to Minnesota.

I was interested to see we processed 1,070 from Turkey and a whopping 1,504 from Malaysia (who were they, illegal aliens trying to reach Australia?).  And we helped out the United Arab Emirates by taking 45 “refugees” off their hands.

This post is archived in our “where to find information” category and our “refugee statistics” category.

Posted in Africa, Changing the way we live, Community destabilization, Iraqi refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information, Who is going where, Your State | Tagged: , | 2 Comments »

Handy directory for US Refugee Resettlement Offices in 180 cities

Posted by Ann Corcoran on December 4, 2014

And, there are 350 of them in 180 cities.  That means that in some cities two or more federally-funded agencies are falling over themselves to bring the joys of ethnic diversity to your neighborhood.

We came across this very useful list last night when we reported on the US State Department launch of their new “refugee” program for children in Central America.

Have a look at who is responsible where you live and keep the list for future reference.  Bear in mind that you might not have an office in your town (yet), but may be getting refugees from one of these offices nearby. 

Ha! Ha!  So much for Wyoming not having a refugee program, they sure do have an office listed!

Wyoming
LIRS
WY-LIRS-01: Lutheran Family Services Rocky Mountains
Address: 1600 Downing Street, Suite 600, Casper, WY 80218
Phone:  303-217-5184
Remember Lutheran Family Services Rocky Mountains, here.

 

Posted in Community destabilization, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Where to find information | Tagged: , | 4 Comments »

CDC Health profiles released for Bhutanese and Congolese refugees in America

Posted by Ann Corcoran on November 14, 2014

The Centers for Disease Control has some reports you might like to see if Bhutanese and/or Congolese refugees are being resettled in your towns.  This could be important information needed by your local health department.

Below is where you can find more information at the CDC website.

For the Bhutanese the big concerns are nutritional deficiencies, communicable diseases and mental health problems relating to their ability to adjust to living here. (We have already brought over 70,000 Bhutanese/Nepalese to the US).

For the Congolese (we have begun the movement of 50,000 to the US) the big concerns are parasites, Malaria, and mental health problems relating to sexual and gender-based violence.

Gee, I guess Obamacare’s money tree will be taking care of all these problems!   (This post is archived in our ‘health issues’ category).

CDC:

The refugee health profiles found on this page provide key health and cultural information for specific refugee groups resettling to the United States. Information gathered from the World Health Organization (WHO), International Organization for Migration (IOM), the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), US Department of State, and other sources is provided to help resettlement agencies, clinicians, and public health providers facilitate medical screening and interventions appropriate for each refugee group.

Each profile has six components:

  • priority health conditions
  • background
  • population movements
  • health care and nutrition in camps/urban settings
  • medical screening of US-bound refugees
  • health information

Available refugee health profiles include:

Posted in Africa, Changing the way we live, Community destabilization, health issues, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information, Who is going where, Your State | Tagged: , , | 3 Comments »

First month of FY2015, Iraqis top the list of refugees resettled by US State Department

Posted by Ann Corcoran on November 11, 2014

The Refugee Processing Center is the keeper of the US State Department’s statistics on refugees arriving in the US. I am asked all the time, do they keep records of religions, and the answer is yes, but those stats are not available to the general public. Only special people have that access. http://www.wrapsnet.org/

October 31st marked the end of the first month of Fiscal Year 2015.  You can have a look at which refugees the US State Department has admitted in those 31 days by clicking here.

Topping the list is Iraq with 1,790 Iraqis going to your towns and cities.

The next five after Iraq are as follows:

Burma:  1,240

Somalia:  871

DR Congo:  625

Bhutan:  370

Iran:  309

And, so far 51 Syrians entered the US in this fiscal year.

By the way, do you see the table listed here entitled: Arrivals by State and Country (Posted after the 5th of the following month).  It is virtually useless to you because the refugees’ nationalities are not given, only the processing country.  So if you look at Minnesota for instance, you can be sure MN got some of those Somalis, but Somalia isn’t listed.  Much to my surprise South Africa is listed! 

WTH, surely we aren’t bringing persecuted white South Africans, but I will bet you a buck we are bringing some of the unwanted Somalis from the RAINBOW NATION!  48 went to Minnesota in just the last month!  So much for South Africa’s image as a welcoming country!

Just one more example of how the State Department keeps information from the general public:  there previously was a data table available for which refugees went to which CITIES, but that is no longer listed as available to you (or me).  You can be sure they have that information!

Remember Obama is shooting for 70,000 total refugees for the year, but dissatisfied resettlement contractors, like the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, are looking for 100,000.

Posted in Iraqi refugees, Obama, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information, Who is going where | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

Office of Refugee Resettlement maps help you research your state, learn who is responsible

Posted by Ann Corcoran on November 4, 2014

Where in the USA are the refugees and the resettlement offices?

I just came across this very useful map for FY2013-2014 at the Office of Refugee Resettlement (HHS) to help you research what is happening with the Refugee Resettlement program in your state.

When you go to the site and click on your state, all of the federal money flowing there is available as well as a list of locations where refugees are resettled with names and contact information for those doing the resettlement.

I can’t emphasize enough how important it is for you to learn about the program where you live.  I know it’s an overused expression, but knowledge is power.  And, that is why we started this blog in the first place to help you gain that knowledge.

Click here for ORR’s interactive state map!  (When you look at the map, you might want to go here for information on what a Wilson-Fish state is).

ORR Regional Offices

In 2013, ORR Director Eskinder Negash, announced the creation of Regional refugee resettlement offices to coordinate state offices.  At that time there were regional refugee offices located within five of the ten Administration for Children and Family (ACF) offices.

ORR will open up to five regional offices in Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, and San Francisco (and potentially additional regional locations).

Click here to see the ten ACF regions and regional headquarters.

Posted in Community destabilization, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Where to find information, Your State | Tagged: , , | Comments Off

US Census figures way off for Somali population in the US?

Posted by Ann Corcoran on November 2, 2014

A comment on one of those discussion boards just caught my eye—the statement was that Somalis are the least educated of the African immigrants living in America.  I laughed out loud when I considered how clever they are at schemes to benefit themselves—like the housing voucher scheme in Cheyenne I just wrote about.  Who needs a formal education when you know how to make it without working too hard.

The discussion thread led to this story about the US Census Bureau report from early October about the African population in America which included this graph:

 

I went to have a look at the Census report and followed a link to this information: The Census Bureau says that 76,205 Somali immigrants live in America.  See Report and Supplemental tables here.

However, we have documented almost 120,000 admitted in the Refugee Resettlement Program alone, click here for that data. Our data doesn’t include all those who are here through other legal immigration programs or those who have entered illegally.

LOL! We know a bunch have left the country to join jihadists but not enough to account for that great a difference.

So, why the discrepancy?  Did the Census Bureau not find about 45,000 or more of them?

Posted in Africa, Changing the way we live, Community destabilization, Muslim refugees, Other Immigration, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

What does the refugee resettlement program cost US taxpayers?

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 29, 2014

A minimum of $1 billion but closer to $10 billion annually?

That is a question we get all the time!  But, honestly no one knows for sure because although the Office of Refugee Resettlement does a survey of a small number of refugees every year (for its always-late annual report to Congress) to see what services refugees access, they have really no idea.

Yesterday a reader (thanks Linda) sent me the Report to Congress for FY2015 that accompanies the Presidential Determination for how many refugees we are bringing in the new fiscal year.  FY2015 began on October 1st.  I hadn’t seen this year’s report, but it is a treasure trove of information which we will be bringing to your attention as time goes on.

This report is not to be confused with Annual Reports to Congress which look back at previous years.

Here is the FY2015 Report to CongressNote that the dollar figures we have here do not include:  costs associated with the Unaccompanied Alien Children’s Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income programs, the Victims of Domestic Trafficking, food stamps, public housing, WIC, education for the children, costs associated with the criminal justice system, interpreters, etc.

Remember Eskinder Negash told us here that the Office of Refugee Resettlement took care of 143,000 ‘refugees’ in FY 2013 (but some were UACs and victims of trafficking).

So, without those costs added in we are paying over $1 billion a year in tax dollars to resettle just over 100,000 refugees and asylees in one year.  Some experts say the cost for the “services” listed above for years (because we don’t just give welfare for the first year in America) would run the tab up to the $5-$10 billion mark each year.

Here, at nearly the last page of the FY2015 report, is the expected cost of resettling roughly just over 100,000 refugees and asylees this year—just to get them in and initially settled.  (Often readers are confused about which agencies are directly involved in the resettlement process.  You can see here it is Homeland Security, US State Department and the US Dept. of Health and Human Services (ORR).)

Table VII

Estimated Available Funding for Refugee Processing, Movement, and Resettlement
FY 2014 and FY 2015 ($ Millions)

 

Agency

Estimated
FY 2014
(by Department)

Estimated
FY 2015
(by Department)

Department of Homeland Security
United States Citizenship and Immigration Services
Refugee Processing 1

$32.3

$32.9

Department of State
Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
Refugee Admissions 2, 3

$494.4

$ 418.0

Department of Health and Human Services
Administration for Children and Families,
Office of Refugee Resettlement
Refugee Resettlement 4

$616.3

$608.1

TOTAL $1,143.0 $1,059.0

The estimated FY 2015 figures above reflect the President’s FY 2015 Budget request and do not include carryover funds from FY 2014.

1 FY 2015: Includes cost factors to reflect Headquarters facilities rent related to the refugee resettlement program, projected staffing enhancements, and following-to-join refugee processing, in addition to certain ICASS costs.

2 FY 2014: Includes FY 2014 MRA appropriation of $351 million, $68.8 million in PRM carryover from FY 2013, $68.6 million projected IOM loan collections/carryover, and an estimate of $6 million in prior year MRA recoveries. A portion of these funds will be carried forward into FY 2015.

3 FY 2015: Includes FY 2015 MRA budget request of $360 million, $52 million in projected IOM loan collections/carryover, and an estimate of $6 million in prior year MRA recoveries. Funds carried forward from FY 2014 will also be available in FY 2015. [IOM loans are travel loans to refugees which when repaid partially return to resettlement contractors and not to the federal treasury—ed]

4 FY 2014 and FY 2015: HHS’s Office of Refugee Resettlement’s (ORR) refugee benefits and services are also provided to asylees, Cuban and Haitian entrants, certain Amerasians from Vietnam, victims of a severe form of trafficking who have received certification or eligibility letters from ORR, and certain family members who are accompanying or following to join victims of severe forms of trafficking, and some victims of torture, as well as Iraqi and Afghan Special Immigrants and their spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21. None of these additional groups is included in the refugee admissions ceiling except Amerasians. This category does not include costs associated with the Unaccompanied Alien Children’s Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income programs, or the Victims of Domestic Trafficking. The estimated FY 2015 figures above reflect the President’s FY 2015 Budget request and do not include carryover funds from FY 2014, as HHS does not anticipate any carryover funding from FY 2014.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Taxpayer goodies, Where to find information | Tagged: | 5 Comments »

Top ten languages spoken by refugees to America in last seven fiscal years; Arabic is #1

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 26, 2014

Fiscal year 2014 just ended on September 30th, so this is a good time to visit the Refugee Processing Center where statistics are managed for the US State Department. Shortly the 2014 year-end stats will disappear down a black hole, so visit Admissions and Arrival reports now! (FY2015 stats for the first month of this new fiscal year will appear shortly after the end of October.)

Just a reminder that it will be your local government and state that will be responsible for providing (paying for!) interpreters in schools, health departments and the criminal justice system as these refugees are resettled in your towns and cities.

Here are the top languages spoken by refugees who arrived in the US in FY2008 – FY2014 (and be sure to note the number speaking ‘minor’ languages):

1 Arabic 91,040

2 Nepali 78,862

3 Sgaw Karen 36,419

4 Somali 34,632

5 Spanish 27,814

6 Chaldean 15,694

7 Burmese 12,248

8 Armenian 12,066

9 Kayah 10,384

10 Other Minor Languages 9,448

Total 328,607

By the way, the US State Department’s Refugee Processing Center previously provided a lot of other very useful information—like what cities refugees were resettled in—which is no longer available to the public.  One more effort to keep this program as secret as they can possibly make it.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information | Tagged: , | 4 Comments »

Taxpayers fund savings accounts for refugees

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 9, 2014

How do refugees get money for cars, houses, education, businesses?

The program is known as Individual Development Accounts through the Office of Refugee Resettlement (HHS).

Albert Mbanfu, Director of the International Center in Bowling Green, Kentucky. http://www.bgdailynews.com/new-international-center-director/image_02fb9de4-89e7-5d6d-97e8-6cf648b73901.html?mode=jqm

This is one of the many ways your local refugee resettlement contractor is able to hand out government (your) cash to refugees and surely get a little cash for themselves for administering the program.  (There are also micro-enterprise loan programs especially for refugees as well).

The local contractor gets a grant from ORR and then refugees may sign up for the savings plan.

For every dollar they save toward certain savings goals, they are matched with a dollar from the US Treasury.  Frankly the complete unfairness of the program to American low income people is often responsible for the hard feelings toward some refugees in certain areas.

We have heard disgruntled citizens ask, for example:  how are they getting cars?

We have reported on this program often but the story we mentioned from Kentucky (yesterday) contained a reference to the program that you may not have noticed, so I thought some clarification was needed.

Here is the section of the ‘Refugees get new homes’ Bowling Green article (hat tip: Robin) that I want you to see:

When Me Meh and her family escaped Burma for a refugee camp in Thailand, they lived in a bamboo house without electricity or other amenities.

The family of 10 resettled in Bowling Green in 2009, bringing with them only some clothes and important papers, Meh said. She was 17. Meh’s two older brothers and her father started work while she went to school and her mother took care of their home.

After a couple of years, the three had saved $4,000. She said the International Center gave them a grant that matched their savings, and they were able to put a downpayment on a house.

The reader is left with the impression that this very nice resettlement contractor—the International Center—was being generous, but this is taxpayer money that was only passed-through the contractor’s coffers!

Go here for a recent list of grantees for the multi-million dollar program.  And, for more information you might want to look at page 38-40 of the FY2012 Annual Report to Congress.   While you are visiting the Annual Report, check out all of the other grant programs that refugee contractors can apply for.  You will be amazed!

Addendum:  I was once told by an official involved with the refugee program in Washington that there is no financial audit done of these resettlement contractors.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Community destabilization, creating a movement, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Taxpayer goodies, Where to find information | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

Fiscal year 2014 wrap-up: Top nationalities admitted to US; top resettlement states

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 7, 2014

If you are following the refugee resettlement program closely you should occasionally visit the Refugee Processing Center for the data the US State Department is willing to allow the public to see.

They have taken away from public view one data table that we previously found interesting and that was the information on which nationalities were resettled in which city.  That was very useful and they surely still track those numbers but are only available to special people who have a pass code to get in.  Likewise they track the religions of refugees but again only friends of the refugee program are allowed to see those.

Before I get to those useful tables that you can still access, I noticed one more way to keep you in the dark.  One table that you might think would be useful and which I initially directed readers to in my previous post (removed now) is one in which it lists which refugees went to which state, BUT, on closer examination, it is useless!  Why?  Because it only shows the processing country and the US state to which the refugee was resettled.  Processing countries are virtually meaningless!

We don’t process refugees directly from Somalia yet we took in 9,000 Somalis in FY 2014 from all over the world apparently.  If you do look at that data table, check out Minnesota to see what I mean—they list no Somalis going to MN last year (2014), but we know they did (see data table from Minnesota listing 977 Somalis arriving there as of August 31), we just don’t know how many were processed in Kenya, in Malta, in Thailand etc.

Political caucus in Minneapolis (men sit on one side, the women on the other). http://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/2014/09/07/wnd-more-on-minnesota-somalis-welfare-and-jihad/ Photo: Star Tribune

Go here for all the data tables available to the public, some updated for September 30th, and some, as of this writing, only updated to August 31.  Don’t delay because these soon disappear down a black hole.

Somalis move up to the number three slot for the most number of refugees we resettled in FY2014. 

(See all of the numbers for Somali resettlement we have compiled over the last 30 years, here).

Top five nationalities of refugees resettled in US in FY 2014 (from this map):

1)  Iraq (19,769) the largest percentage will be Muslim

2)  Burma (14,598)  most will be Christians, other minority religions and some Muslims

3)  Somalia (9,000) Muslims  (almost up to George Bush levels!)

4)  Bhutan/Nepal (8,434) most will be Hindu, Buddhist, a few Christians

5)  D.R. Congo (4,540) mostly Christians

Remember we learned the other day that the Bhutan resettlement would soon end and be replaced by Syrian refugees who will be majority Muslim.

Top ten states receiving refugees in FY 2014 (I took these off the map so check it for me!):

1)  Texas (7,211)

2)  California (6,110)

3)  New York (4,079)

4)  Michigan (4,000)

5)  Florida (3,519)

6)  Arizona (2,963)

7)  Ohio (2,812)

8)  Pennsylvania (2,743)

9)  Georgia (2,693)

10)  Illinois (2,578)

North Carolina and Washington state are not far behind.

We have archived this information in two categories here at RRW:  Refugee Statistics and Where to find information.

Just a reminder to states (like Wyoming!) and cities which will “welcome” refugees in FY2015, you will not get refugees just from certain countries, but will get a smattering from a wide variety of countries which will make it even more difficult to deal with the language problems in the schools, the health department and the criminal justice system.   See the language stats by going here and clicking on ‘top ten languages.’

Posted in Changing the way we live, Iraqi refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information | Tagged: , , | 7 Comments »

 

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