Refugee Resettlement Watch

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Archive for July 30th, 2013

Someone dares to say it: rich Muslim countries should take their share of refugees!

Posted by Ann Corcoran on July 30, 2013

Related Update July 31:  Abbott beware, three of Obama’s “brains” arriving to help Rudd get re-elected, here.

Australia is awash with boat people mostly from Muslim countries like Afghanistan.  What to do with them is really a pivotal issue in upcoming elections.  Here in The Australian’s “Talking Points” section are two suggestions.

Leader of the Opposition Tony Abbott

WRITING about the influx of illegal immigrants across the southern border of the US, columnist Michelle Malkin bluntly referred to it as an invasion. That is what Australia is experiencing now, and Tony Abbott is right in planning to put a top general in charge.

One solution to the problem of asylum-seekers is to airlift them to the nearest UN refugee camp where they can take their turn in line with all those who have been waiting.

At the same time, Australia should request wealthy and stable Muslim countries to take their share of those fleeing from violence. Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the Gulf Emirates are wealthy and stable and import large numbers of workers. They should be expected to take their share.

I don’t know about Qatar and the Gulf Emirates, but Saudi Arabia takes no refugees.  In fact there were many reports about the Saudi’s immediately sending Somalis, who were caught in SA, back to Mogadishu when it was controlled by the terrorists.  The UNHCR is skittish, to say the least, about pressuring the ethnic nationalist Saudis.

Update:  A reader just reminded me of a post I wrote in April about the UAE passing off their illegal immigrants to the US.

Way back in 2007, when Muslim refugees were being brought to the county where I live by the Virginia Council of Churches, I remember former Congressman Roscoe Bartlett asking logically ‘why aren’t they going to Saudi Arabia?’  Why of course, excellent idea!

Always remember, this is not about the poor and downtrodden (that is the pretense!), it is about Al Hijra!

Let me know if you are having trouble viewing the photo—it just disappeared for me.

Posted in Asylum seekers, Australia, Muslim refugees, Stealth Jihad, Who is going where | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

Egypt’s Coptic Christians taking refuge in Georgia (the country)

Posted by Ann Corcoran on July 30, 2013

Georgians were among the earliest to adopt Christianity as a state religion. The neighboring Armenians were first. (Vano Shlamov/AFP/Getty Images)

Egypt’s long-persecuted Coptic Christians are getting out of dodge—out of Egypt in spite of the removal of the Obama Administration’s pals, the Muslim Brotherhood, from the seat of power.

They are being welcomed in Christian Georgia.

From the Global Post (thanks to a reader for sending it):

TBILISI, Georgia — Ever since ouster of Egyptian strongman President Hosni Mubarak two years ago, Adel has faced a difficult dilemma: Leave behind a relatively cushy life in Egypt or stay and risk discrimination and violence as religious and sectarian tensions rise.

[….]

“In Egypt, it’s difficult to get visas to the U.S. or Europe,” 50-year-old Adel says. “We didn’t chose Georgia, Georgia is choosing us.”

He’s not alone. Christian minorities from both Egypt and Syria are starting to look to the South Caucasus countries of Georgia and Armenia as a refuge from violence and uncertainly.

The choice isn’t as random as it may seem. Sandwiched between Turkey, Iran and Russia’s predominately Muslim North Caucasus regions, both Georgia and Armenia have ancient Christian traditions dating back to the 4th century. Their churches are closely related to the Copts and other Eastern Christian confessions.

Muslim Brotherhood is the reason they are moving out.  Even out of power, the MB is dangerous!

Adel, who asked that his last name not be used for fear of reprisals against his family, said that although Christians faced discrimination under Mubarak’s long rule, the Muslim Brotherhood’s rise to power in 2012 has increased pressure on religious minorities and led many of Egypt’s estimated 5 million to 15 million Copts to look for the exits.

[….]

Although he supports the Egyptian military’s ouster of the Muslim Brotherhood government earlier this month, he says he fears the Islamist organization will be “just as dangerous out of power.”

Read it all. The photo and caption are from this Global Post story as well.

Oh, yuk, see this from The Economist only yesterday where the EU is pressuring Georgia to have “European values.”

Posted in Asylum seekers, Christian refugees, Europe | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

UK refugee advocates pressure government to bring in the Syrians

Posted by Ann Corcoran on July 30, 2013

It is just a short piece demonstrating that the drumbeat has begun to pressure western governments to resettle Syrian refugees in order to supposedly take the pressure off of Turkey and other Muslim countries.   This is Syria’s civil war, right?

Syrian refugees in Turkey. Photo: The Guardian

From Ekklesia:

Leading UK refugee charities have called on the Government to work with European Union member states to establish a resettlement programme in the UK and Europe for Syrian refugees.

The Refugee Council, Refugee Action, the Scottish Refugee Council and the Welsh Refugee Council are calling for a co-ordinated effort across Europe to relieve some of the pressure on the burgeoning refugee camps on the Syrian border.

Readers in the UK should be closely following the ‘work’ of the groups making up the refugee industry in the UK.

The photo is from this story in The Guardian—Tough time for Turks.

Posted in Europe | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

 
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