Refugee Resettlement Watch

Top language of refugees entering the US since 2008 is still Arabic

Posted by Ann Corcoran on May 17, 2016

We previously reported on data regarding top languages of refugees here in April of last year.

This is the latest from the US State Department’s Refugee Processing Center, here.  This is data for the period from 2008 up until April 30, 2016.

Remember, these are only the languages spoken by refugees, this does not include those spoken by other categories of legal immigrants or of illegal immigrants.

 

Screenshot (36)

[If the above isn’t clear enough, this is the list: Arabic, Nepali, Somali, Sgaw Karen, Spanish, Chaldean, Burmese, Armenian, Kiswahili, other.]

We notice that since we reported a year ago, Somali has moved up to number three.  Also Kayah (a language from Burma) is off the list and Kiswahili (African language) replaces it at number 9.  I’m guessing that is because the State Department is moving ahead quickly with its proposed resettlement to your towns of 50,000 from the DR Congo.

Pay attention new refugee resettlement towns and cities!

When contemplating becoming a “welcoming” refugee community, remember you, state and local taxpayers are responsible for providing interpreters (Bill Clinton Executive Order!) for just about anything from medical treatment, problems in the school system and in the criminal justice system, etc. etc. etc.

14 Responses to “Top language of refugees entering the US since 2008 is still Arabic”

  1. […] 6)  The greatest impact on your local social and economic welfare will be felt first in the school system, followed usually by the shortage of government subsidized housing.  Your school system may end up with 50 or more languages represented in the student population.  The number-one language of refugees entering the US right now is Arabic, Somali is number four. (Update: Somali has moved to number 3, here.) […]

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  2. […] 6)  The greatest impact on your local social and economic welfare will be felt first in the school system, followed usually by the shortage of government subsidized housing.  Your school system may end up with 50 or more languages represented in the student population.  The number-one language of refugees entering the US right now is Arabic, Somali is number four. (Update: Somali has moved to number 3, here.) […]

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  3. […] Did you know Somali is the third fastest growing language in the US, after Arabic? I’m sure all of them are strict constitutionalist with a deep philosophical regard for freedom and limited government. […]

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  4. usnveteran said

    May 16, 2016
    The Senate Grew A Special Visa Program With Money Taken Out Of Veterans’ Pockets:
    “The Senate used money from benefit cuts to military Veterans in the 2016 budget to pay for the resettlement of an additional 3,000 Afghan interpreters in the United States. …”:
    http://dailycaller.com/2016/05/16/the-senate-grew-a-special-visa-program-with-money-taken-out-of-veterans-pockets/

    [They will probably get employed as foreign language teachers]

    Liked by 1 person

  5. sodiumpen said

    Some additional info regarding the treatment of TB:

    FYI: 2010 Costs to treat the 3 types of TB per person/patient

    Cost to treat a “regular” TB patient = $17,000
    Cost to treat Multiple drug resistant TB patient = $134,000
    Cost to treat extremely drug resistant TB = $430,000

    Multiple drug resistant TB patients are paid for by taxpayers 80% of the time – extremely drug resistant are paid for by taxpayers 100% of the time. Of course, refugees have taxpayers paying, regardless of type of TB, 100% o the time.

    http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/20/5/13-1037_article

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  6. […] Tagged: interpreters, US State Department. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 […]

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  7. sodiumpen said

    Another example of government vetting of refugees . . .

    Reminder: Legal immigrants must have a MD performed physical examination plus be up-to-date on all required inoculations before they are accepted into the USA. Sounds like refugees do not get a physical exam until they are settled in the USA. Our government is so concerned with the health of US citizens it is seeding us with TB (and other disease) infected refugees. Add the expensive health care treatment costs, for both groups, to the already phenomenal cost of importing “refugees”.

    “One of every five refugees resettled in Minnesota by the federal government tested positive for latent tuberculosis in 2014, according to the state’s Department of Health.”

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/05/17/22-resettled-refugees-minnesota-tested-positive-tuberculosis/

    Liked by 1 person

  8. 7delta said

    Executive orders like this need to be challenged. There’s a debate about whether EO’s are Constitutional or not, but their use dates back to George Washington. The difference between then and now is that the intended use was merely for the president to direct the federal agencies and officials under his supervision to properly and faithfully implement laws passed by Congress. EO’s were never intended to legislate, to usurp the power of another branch or to usurp or circumvent the States’ authority. In this respect, I would say they’re absolutely unconstitutional. The broadening of presidential power has been so slow and generational, people have come to think presidents have the authority to issue decrees by EO.

    In Printz v. U.S., SCOTUS, not for the first time, delivered an opinion that says otherwise…during the Clinton Administration (1999, I think.) The federal government has no authority to force or enforce rules, regulations or regulatory schemes onto the States, without State consent. Nor can the federal government go through a State agency, officer, official or use other means to circumvent the State Legislature or coerce State Legislatures to pass laws to implement the rules or regulations.

    Consent is granted by contract between the federal government and the State when the feds want to implement programs, etc. that are outside its Constitutionally granted powers. In return for federal funding to operate the program, States relinquish their sovereignty in that narrowly defined jurisdiction. The feds cannot come back later, like with the Health Care Act, education, etc., and use withholding of funds as a means of coercion or alter the terms of the contract unilaterally. It’s a breach of contract. As bad as the ACA opinion was, Roberts upheld this principle. I’m of the opinion that Roberts’ opinion was written under duress. Just a gut feeling due to the “voice” and content of the ruling. I think he left lots of breadcrumbs, but people were too angry to look for them or to even listen.

    At any rate, all this considered, including the very important point that the RRP mechanism is different than consenting to participate in programs like the ACA, therefore States do not relinquish sovereignty when they consent to participate, Clinton’s EO isn’t worth the paper it’s written on. No one has a civil right to be provided a translator. It might be a nice thing to do, under certain circumstances, but the executive branch doesn’t have the authority to require it or to suddenly find a new civil right, as it so often does these days, which is the case, because the federal government controls the civil portion of citizenship, while States control the political. Everything is a civil right now, because it’s a handy tool to fundamentally transform America. As long as people don’t realize it’s a lie, it works.

    To quote Chief Justice Roberts from the first ACA decision, “States are sovereign and should start acting like it.” Just say no. All States, but especially Wilson-Fish States. They should jump on this like a duck on a junebug.

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  9. Reblogged this on Kerberos616.

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  10. mikekiljom said

    We need a time limit on them learning our language. Something like 6 months. Give em a test then: if they cannot pass basic English, DEPORT THEM AS THEY WILL NOT ASSIMILATE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  11. bari1951 said

    Reblogged this on Kattukse Vrienden voor Israël.

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  12. Reblogged this on Rifleman III Journal.

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  13. […] Top language of refugees entering the US since 2008 is still Arabic […]

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  14. […] RELATED ARTICLE: Top language of refugees entering the US since 2008 is still Arabic […]

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