Refugee Resettlement Watch

Tennessee governor does not veto Legislature’s resolution opening door to states’ rights lawsuit

Posted by Ann Corcoran on May 20, 2016

Update: Michael Patrick Leahy has a much more understandable story on what the governor has done (or not done), and what it means.  Click here for more.

The Tennessean titles this breaking news today a lot more optimistically (from our point of view) than the article actually indicates:

Haslam will allow Tennessee to become first to sue feds over refugee resettlement

Stephanie Teatro

Tennessee Immigrant Rights spokeswoman: “… the governor has helped secure Tennessee’s reputation as the most unwelcoming state in the country.”

Regular readers know that the Tennessee legislature overwhelmingly resolved to sue the federal government on 10th Amendment grounds and rather than sign the measure, the governor is going to let it go forward by not vetoing it either.

No matter! The reaction of the refugee industry activists tells me it must be good news for us!

Here is just a bit of the story, read it all:

Despite having concerns, Gov. Bill Haslam will allow Tennessee to become the first state in the nation to sue the federal government over refugee resettlement on the grounds of the 10th Amendment.

On Friday, Haslam announced his decision to allow the measure, which directs Attorney General Herbert Slatery to sue the federal government for noncompliance of the Refugee Act of 1980, to become law without his signature.

[….]

Explaining his decision, Haslam noted the provisions in the bill that allows the General Assembly to hire outside counsel if Slatery refuses to pursue the case.

“I trust the Attorney General to determine whether the state has a claim in this case or in any other, and I have constitutional concerns about one branch of government telling another what to do,” Haslam said. “I am returning SJR 467 without my signature and am requesting that the Attorney General clarify whether the legislative branch actually has the authority to hire outside counsel to represent the state.”

Slatery’s office has not indicated whether he would follow the legislature’s directive.

Haslam also questioned whether it was the “proper course” for the state to attempt to dismantle the refugee act. [Shouldn’t it be a Republican governor’s job to stand up for states’ rights?—besides, the state isn’t dismantling the act, it is only asking the courts for a ruling—ed]

Read on here to get the full flavor of the waffling going on!

Regarding Ms. Teatro’s comments about “unwelcoming” states, it would be so much fun to have a competition for the most unwelcoming state in the Nation!  You could all send in your nominations!

They think that just by uttering the word “unwelcoming” you will be shaking in your boots and begging for forgiveness.

Come on Kansas, come on New Jersey!

7 Responses to “Tennessee governor does not veto Legislature’s resolution opening door to states’ rights lawsuit”

  1. […] Read More […]

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  2. Dr. Rich Swier said

    Great. Posted: http://bit.ly/27Kp0OI

    Rich

    On Fri, May 20, 2016 at 5:48 PM, Refugee Resettlement Watch wrote:

    > Ann Corcoran posted: “The Tennessean titles this breaking news today a lot > more optimistically (from our point of view) than the article actually > indicates: Haslam will allow Tennessee to become first to sue feds over > refugee resettlement Regular readers know that the Te” >

    Like

  3. Reblogged this on Kerberos616.

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  4. mjazzguitar said

    All the states adversely impacted by the influx of refugees should file a class action suit against the government, and the refugee resettlement companies.

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  5. sturandot13 said

    They should remember that the Thomas More Law Center is willing to fight for them. Tennessee should take them up on it!!!

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    • Ann Corcoran said

      There are another 13 states that could avail themselves of the Thomas More Law Center for a fight, if the governors of those states had any backbone!

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  6. Reblogged this on Rifleman III Journal.

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