Refugee Resettlement Watch

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Archive for July 11th, 2016

More on Rutland Vermont’s refugee controversy

Posted by Ann Corcoran on July 11, 2016

Update: Breitbart has just learned that the Vermont Health Dept. has treated 17 cases of ACTIVE Tuberculosis in the refugee population placed in that state by the US State Department.

I’ve been remiss in not reporting on the drama in Rutland, VT last week as the Aldermen there voted on whether to place a referendum seeking the public’s approval (or disapproval) of the city becoming Vermont’s next federal resettlement site.

Anne Richard UN seal

The Aldermen of Rutland, VT are asking Richard (Asst. Sec. of State for Populations, Refugees and Migration) for more information on the plans for the city. The nerve of them!

I am woefully behind on the Vermont news (although I did post on the latest regarding ACTIVE TB in the state here),  so forgive me if more important things have happened since the vote.  Here Watchdog.org reports on the vote (they voted to not put the referendum on the ballot).

By the way, the focus has been on Syrian refugees resettling there, but once an office is open, a smattering of many other ethnic groups will be brought in—Somalis, Congolese, Burmese, Iraqis and so forth—making assimilation even harder as each ethnic group creates its core community. Myriad ethnic groups also increase the expense to local tax payers for the school system and even the health department as interpreters must be provided for each group.

You should read Watchdog.org for all the details of the debate, but I wanted to emphasize one thing mentioned by one of the Aldermen:

David Trapeni, a two-time mayoral candidate and the organizer of the petition drive, criticized the resettlement plan as too open-ended.

“It’s not a hundred — it’s hundreds of refugees that come,” Trapeni said. “Once you open that door that’s it — you’re going to get hundreds, and you’re not going to have any say.”

I cannot stress enough how significant Trapeni’s comment is.  He is exactly right!  You cannot shut the spigot off once the pipeline starts to flow. You can’t next year say, well, that doesn’t work for us and expect the feds and their contractor to shutter the office they opened and fire the staff.  This program builds on itself because first, the agency is paid by the head to resettle the refugees, and secondly they are hellbent on bringing in the family members once the original seeds are planted. You will be even more vilified when you say we don’t want families reunited.

In the controversy in Spartanburg, SC a year ago, the contractor/feds promised to bring in only 50 refugees, now the plan for next year is 150 (I didn’t check the exact number, but it is at least that many).

It will not end, just ask the mayors of Manchester, NH or Amarillo, TX who have been trying for years to close the spigot!

Aldermen ask Asst. Sec. of State Anne Richard for more information

This (news) is a very interesting turn of events and frankly I have to give this local body a thumbs-up for even taking an initiative like this.

Basically they are signaling that local governments have a right to all the facts. That is the last thing the refugee industry wants to set a precedent about. The arrogant feds and contractors are so accustomed to operating in secrecy that they don’t want to be in a position to answer questions.

A word of caution…

However, when pressed they have been able to put on shows for the public as they did in Spartanburg, SC and in Twin Falls, Idaho where they came to town and held private meetings (Spartanburg) or held a stacked public meeting as they did in Twin Falls and gave their positive spin on refugee resettlement. (So Rutland should be prepared for such a propaganda initiative from Washington.)

Nevertheless, every city government should be so audacious as to demand more answers from the federal government. After all, your town will be changed forever!

I’ll be very interested to see how Ms. Richard responds to the letter (read it here).  Will she decide the controversy in Rutland isn’t worth pushing any further and move on to another (weaker) target town in Vermont? Or, will she put up a fight here as a show of power by bringing in her dog and pony show?

Read the whole story at the Times Argus.

Our Rutland archive is here (for new readers!).

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Pockets of Resistance, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, The Opposition, Who is going where | Tagged: , , | 10 Comments »

AP: Syrian processing to America on steroids, governors like MD Gov. Hogan can’t do a thing about it

Posted by Ann Corcoran on July 11, 2016

No Syrian Muslims have been placed in Washington DC!

There isn’t much new and useful in this AP story from Saturday, but wanted to mention it only because once again the feds are telling concerned governors to go fly a kite—the UN/US State Dept. is speeding up the Syrian refugee processing in Jordan and Turkey. Governors are impotent to stop it is the message.

Simon henshaw 3

Remember Simon Henshaw as the State Department official charged with assuring you that Syrians they admit are all good and decent people (like the sexual deviant arrested in Massachusetts last week?) Henshaw’s bio is here: http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/biog/bureau/213334.htm

There is a little nugget here that I didn’t know about: Apparently the DEMOCRAT mayor of Roanoke, VA did not want Syrians resettled in an already refugee-overloaded city.

We’ve written a few times about Roanoke perhaps most famous for the refugee gang found guilty there for planning to kidnap and ransom some prominent women in the town, here in 2009.  (Gee, I wonder if they were deported when they were released after their short prison sentence?)

Associated Press (at the Washington Post):

Dozens of Syrian refugees were settled in Maryland and Virginia in June, part of a sharp nationwide increase as the U.S. government scrambles to meet its goal of admitting 10,000 refugees in fiscal 2016.

The surge has come despite opposition from more than half of the nation’s governors, including Maryland’s Larry Hogan (R), all of whom say they are not satisfied with the federal government’s assurances that refugees are carefully vetted and screened.

[…..]

The pace of refugee resettlement has quickened in part because processing facilities in Istanbul and in Amman, Jordan, have been upgraded and more Department of Homeland Security teams have been deployed to interview refugees, a State Department official said.

“We pushed all those things together so they would happen sequentially and more quickly,” said Simon Henshaw, principal deputy assistant secretary of the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration.

In Maryland, 78 Syrians were settled in June – bringing the total to 115 since October. Sixty-seven arrived in Virginia last month, out of 87 resettled in the state this year. Fifteen of them have been placed in Roanoke, where the Democratic mayor attracted national controversy last fall for citing the internment of Japanese citizens as a reason to bar Syrian refugees.

No refugees have been brought to the District of Columbia, according to the State Department data. [No, of course not!—ed]

Continue reading here.

Photo: My reference to the Syrian charged with sexual assault refers to this story.  And, here, Breitbart has Pamela Geller’s reaction to the latest refugee sex crime.

Regarding my title! In truth, Gov. Hogan and other of the governors concerned about the program could do something about it if they had the political will, but most don’t.  It is easy to say they don’t like what is happening to satisfy voters, but quite another to put on the state’s rights fight that would be necessary.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Muslim refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Who is going where | Tagged: , , , | 2 Comments »

 
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