Refugee Resettlement Watch

The continuing budget resolution has destroyed Congress’ power to limit government

Posted by Ann Corcoran on September 9, 2016

Neither the Democrats or the Republicans want to limit it!

Readers, you might prefer juicy and outrageous stories about immigrant and refugee crimes, about security screening, about what Trump and Hillary are doing today, about resettlement contractors rolling in your money, about immigrant fraud, about George Soros and his ilk, about progressives (Dems!) changing America by changing its people, but there is only one issue now, as boring as it might be, and that is that the Republican leadership in Congress has sold you out for more than two decades and it is they who are changing America by changing its people by not standing up for you and the US Constitution first!

This is the next installment in my recent civics lesson (I’m learning this too!) in what I hope is not a vain (time wasting) effort to focus your attention on the Republicans in Congress.

Below is an excellent (2013) explanation by author Angelo Codevilla about how Congressional leaders (Rs and Ds) have subverted the Constitution to advance permanent ruling class control over our government and your money! Hat tip: Richard at Blue Ridge Forum.

From Library of Law and Liberty (sorry to snip so much but please read this and then continue reading the whole article):

The current battle over whether the 2013 Continuing Appropriations Resolution (CR) should de-fund Obamacare or not [substitute this year’s battle over refugee funding—ed] is the latest instance in which the CR mechanism is being used on behalf of a big government program the demise of which would be certain were Congress to play its Constitutional role by following its “regular order” as the keeper of the people’s purse – a role fundamental to democracy.

Herewith, a brief explanation of how new the CR system of funding the US government is, and how radically subversive of republican government. Important to America as Obamacare’s fate may be, the current battle’s stake is nothing less than whether the people can control government through their representatives or whether government can define its own scope and powers.

Since the Middle Ages, the first and most basic restraint on arbitrary government has been the people’s power to decide how much money the government will spend, and for what purposes. The US Constitution puts it this way: “No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in consequence of Appropriations made by law” (Art. I sect.9). Nowadays however our bipartisan ruling class limits the Congress’ opportunity to approve, disapprove, or modify what the government does, to voting on “Continuing Appropriations Resolutions” – single, all-inclusive bills crafted behind closed doors. Then it cynically asks the people’s representatives: “will you agree to laws no one has read, to programs on the continuation of which you have not voted, and to regulations that haven’t been written yet, or will you shut down the government?” This turns democracy into a choice between tyranny and anarchy.

Until circa 1990, Americans had taken seriously the relationship between appropriations and democracy. House and Senate used to divide the Executive departments’ requests for funds and programs into multiple categories and sub-categories. Then many committees and subcommittees held hearings on each item, followed by “mark-up” sessions in which each would be modified and voted on. Thereafter, the full House and Senate would debate, amend, approve or disapprove them, one by one. This was “regular order” – more or less as described in civics books.

This changed at first gradually in the 1980s, when Democrats (and Republicans) who were resisting the Reagan Administration’s efforts to trim government figured out that individual appropriations bills delayed until the end of the fiscal year could be rolled together into “omnibus” bills. These could be advertised as merely “continuing” the current year’s programs and spending levels. In reality, these all-in-one bills 1) protected current programs from scrutiny, amendment, or repeal 2) were stuffed with new favors, programs, provisions and priorities that could not have survived an open process.

[….]

…. the Republican leadership, by acquiescing in the practice of funding the government by Continuing Resolutions rather than by individual appropriations has emasculated the most virile means by which mankind has ever limited government.

Continue reading here.

And, so here we are again, in the fall of 2016, and Congress is doing the same damn thing!

If you are saying, it is too late this year (maybe next year will be a better year if Trump is President) and these mostly globalists we have elected are never going to rein-in (in our case) the out of control spending for the US Refugee Admissions Program, then quit reading right now.

But, I say that even if we have not even a snowball’s chance in hell of slowing the flow of our money to this program, we must still let everyone of our Congressmen and US Senators know we are mad as hell about it and we aren’t going to forget what they are doing to America!

At this point I should be linking contact information for you to contact your Washington ‘lawmakers,’ but I won’t because if you don’t know by now how to find them you are part of the problem. Tell them to shut it down now!

Next, more on the House Freedom Caucus and how you are being played!

See my tag ‘Where is Congress’ for more on funding refugee resettlement.  Forget Obama and forget the Dems, the power is in the hands of the Republicans in the House and Senate!

Update: Be sure to see what the Refugee Council USA (the lobbying arm of the refugee industry) is saying about contacting Congress, here. Remember they mention RRW in their toolkit.

3 Responses to “The continuing budget resolution has destroyed Congress’ power to limit government”

  1. […] The continuing budget resolution has destroyed Congress’ power to limit government September 9, 2016 […]

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  2. Reblogged this on Kerberos616.

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  3. Well said, Ann.

    Liked by 1 person

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