Refugee Resettlement Watch

New York Times uses the B-word (boycott) when writing about Chobani Yogurt

Posted by Ann Corcoran on November 1, 2016

They raised the issue, not me!

I’m not complaining about the New York Times, this is what they do, but I thought you should see this article (just in case you didn’t know you were a xenophobic hater for questioning what Hamdi Ulukaya is doing to Twin Falls, Idaho).

They must be really fearing another B-word too—Breibart!

And, no surprise, they even bring Donald Trump into the story.

It doesn’t matter if Ulukaya’s plans to change Twin Falls have been done in secrecy. It doesn’t matter if he puts on the white hat of humanitarianism as he encourages a steady supply of cheap immigrant labor to be brought in at your (taxpayer) expense.  It doesn’t matter if some critics believe refugee labor is slave labor. It doesn’t matter if you object to the social and cultural changes he promotes for your community, or that he got lucrative government contracts during the Obama Administration.

None of those things matter to the NYT which is out to silence free speech. Only one thing matters and that is you are a hater of foreigners and they get to call you one of their favorite grown-up words—xenophobic—for daring to question his business practices that depend on your tax dollars!

Here is the story:

By many measures, Chobani embodies the classic American immigrant success story.

screenshot-14

That is Lavinia Limon on the left. She is the CEO of a federal refugee resettlement contractor (USCRI–97% funded by you) and Mr. Chobani Yogurt at the Clinton Global Initiative. Ms. Limon is paid to supply Chobani Yogurt with legal refugee labor for his Twin Falls, Idaho plant. https://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/2016/09/05/this-federal-refugee-contracting-agency-is-97-taxpayer-funded/

Its founder, Hamdi Ulukaya, is a Turkish immigrant of Kurdish descent. He bought a defunct yogurt factory in upstate New York, added a facility in Twin Falls, Idaho, and now employs about 2,000 people making Greek yogurt.

But in this contentious election season, the extreme right has a problem with Chobani: In its view, too many of those employees are refugees.

As Mr. Ulukaya has stepped up his advocacy — employing more than 300 refugees in his factories, starting a foundation to help migrants, and traveling to the Greek island of Lesbos to witness the crisis firsthand — he and his company have been targeted with racist attacks on social media and conspiratorial articles on websites including Breitbart News.

Now there are calls to boycott Chobani. Mr. Ulukaya and the company have been taunted with racist epithets on Twitter and Facebook. Fringe websites have published false stories claiming Mr. Ulukaya wants “to drown the United States in Muslims.” And the mayor of Twin Falls has received death threats, partly as a result of his support for Chobani.

Online hate speech is on the rise, reflecting the rising nationalism displayed by some supporters of Donald J. Trump, who has opposed resettling refugees in the United States.

“What’s happening with Chobani is one more flash point in this battle between the voices of xenophobia and the voices advocating a rational immigration policy,” said Cecillia Wang, director of the Immigrants’ Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union.

Continue reading here.

I’m guessing that the calls on social media to boycott Chobani Yogurt must be having an impact, and I am further guessing that the NYT is not helping the yogurt company one bit with this story.

(I think most people had forgotten that there were calls to boycott Chobani Yogurt.)

See our complete archive on the continuing controversy in Twin Falls, Idaho by clicking here.

13 Responses to “New York Times uses the B-word (boycott) when writing about Chobani Yogurt”

  1. […] we go again with Chobani Yogurt changing America to supply its labor needs (with the help of a fake […]

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  2. […] told you recently that the NY Times has gone to bat for Hamdi Ulukaya who is changing Twin Falls, Idaho with a […]

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  3. […] New York Times uses the B-word (boycott) when writing about Chobani Yogurt […]

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  4. I boycott Chobani Yogurt because it’s Halal-certified. I am an admin for many Boycott Halal pages on Facebook (an international organization that started in the UK about 8 years ago and is now in many countries including my own, Canada). When you buy any halal-certified product and/or service you pay a dhimmi tax/a slave tax with funds going to so-called Islamic “charities” i.e. mosques, madrasses and their terror groups. Halal encompasses more than just ritual animal slaughter and food items – the certification is now on everything, including cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, tourism and even some feminine hygiene products. I can tell you that our pages have a BIG impact on the buying public; muslims are irate over this but we prevail! So Boycott Halal; Boycott Halal in Canada; Boycott Halal in US; Boycott Halal in the US, Canada, New Zealand and Australia; there are others now in other countries fighting the Sharia! Thanks, Ann!

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    • Ann Corcoran said

      Wow! Thanks Denise. I didn’t know. Since Thanksgiving is right around the corner, what about turkeys. Other than buying home grown, are there any safe non-Halal commercial turkeys?

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  5. Reblogged this on Kerberos616.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I suspect that Chobani hires refugees because the refugees will be too scared to complain when they get mistreated. Another reason Chobani prefers refugees is because tax breaks are given to companies that hire refugees. I have actually heard rumors of high turnover with Chobani’s workforce due to long hours, abusive managers, and unpleasant working conditions. I would boycott Chobani because they have too much sugar in their yogurt anyways. BOYCOTT CHOBANI. There are many brands which sell cheaper yogurt. If you want to save even more money, make kefir at home. Kefir is a healthier form of yogurt and it is easy to make.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I already realized a few years back to boycott this yogurt. Just common sense to me when I found out it was muslim owned. They usually are up to no good so that is the reason why. Guess my instincts were right on. Glad I don’t buy it.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. tvfmontana said

    Apparently the boycott is working for NYT to finally acknowledge it as it’s been up since Jan 2016. Fwd: Yogurt billionaire: ‘Hire more Muslim refugees’ on Disqus
    U.S. Yogurt billionaire asks businesses to hire more foreign refugees
    http://mobile.wnd.com/2016/01/yogurt-billionaire-hire-more-muslim-refugees/

    Liked by 1 person

  8. […] via New York Times uses the B-word (boycott) when writing about Chobani Yogurt — Refugee Resettlement … […]

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  9. If the owner of that company went to Greece, didn’t he notice all of the problems the “refugees” caused? even the dimmest of people could conclude that this man is either incredibly stupid, or that he saw all of the problems the illegals caused, and decided to bring the problem to us. I’m also thinking he probably gets tax breaks and other incentives for being an accessory to the invasion, so yes, we should boycott his product, or perhaps accidentally pick up a few containers of his product, then leave them somewhere in the store to rot.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Reblogged this on .

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  11. Reblogged this on Booksbyjameswnelson and commented:
    I boycotted choboni yogurt long ago.

    Liked by 1 person

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