Refugee Resettlement Watch

Michigan: More confirmation that refugee resettlement is an industry

Posted by Ann Corcoran on March 11, 2017

I don’t have enough time in my day to post all of the stories from around the country where federal refugee resettlement contractors are crying about their loss of clients and thus their loss of taxpayer funding.

But, this one from Michigan has a few extra nuggets of information that further confirms our contention that refugee resettlement is more of an industry than it is a humanitarian endeavor.

Julie Harris, St. Vincent Catholic Charities Refugee Services, photo here from one year ago this same week (what a difference a year/election makes). http://www.secondwavemedia.com/capitalgains/features/fugee1005.aspx

The Trump Administration must pressure Congress to repeal, and, if necessary, replace the Refugee Act of 1980 with its perverse incentives to place refugees (secretively) in towns that can ill afford the additional poverty.

If a town is overloaded with costly-to-support refugees, the system is set up in such a way as to conspire against rational decision-making.

Watch for these key points:

~Contractors are paid by the head, so there is no incentive for contractors to voluntarily slow the flow.

~Landlords with low income and subsidized rentals have become dependent on the arrival of poor people from the third world.

~Businesses want the cheap compliant immigrant labor.

~And, ‘refugees’ have become dependent on the idea of being able to bring over the whole family after one member scouts out your town to see if it suits them before others are brought over (with the help of those same contractors and their per head payment).

From WKAR Lansing, Michigan:

The executive orders on immigration directly impact immigrants and refugees trying to come to the US and those living here already. But the orders are also causing problems for organizations who support refugees.

[….]

There’s a call for a 120 day delay on all refugee resettlement from everywhere. And during that time presumably there will be a revision and a a reestablishment of vetting procedures. And then the other piece of that that will be hurting us is the overall reduction in the number of refugees coming in for the rest of 2017 and 2018 probably.”

And this impacts St. Vincent and other refugee resettlement organizations because they are based on a per-capita funding structure.

“All of that greatly reduces the number of refugees that we’ll be receiving, and that in turn reduces our budget. So we’ve had to do some staff reductions and layoffs and reorganizing while we’re still trying to serve the people who are here, the people who have already arrived” Harris says.

It goes beyond just St. Vincent. Harris says the community and the organizations they partner with when resettling refugees are impacted too.

“We work with a lot of different landlords and different apartment complexes and different landlords around the city and some of them have called us and said ‘what are we going to do? Who are we going to put in our housing?’

Because they rely on us because there’s a lot of folks who move in and out, and a lot of the low income places who have been very kind to the whole community, they need people to be coming in and keeping their units full. And also a lot of our employers, we work with some big companies who look forward to having a steady stream of people who come in. A lot of refugees will start off in an entry level job and they’ll work hard and after they learn English, they learn a few more things, they’ll move up. And so these companies need the steady flow of people coming in and keeping their businesses running.”

Continue reading here to learn about how the family reunification works and will be disrupted by the Trump EO.

If you are working in a ‘pocket of resistance’ investigating the program where you live, be sure to research costs, but look for those people/businesses benefiting from the refugees.  Remind your fellow (taxpaying) citizens that there is money (for some people) in the resettlement industry.

Endnote:  I just did a quick look at USASpending.gov and see that the Diocese of Lansing gets millions of $$$ of federal funding from the usual agencies—HHS and Dept. of State, and that St. Vincent’s also got money from HUD.

They aren’t in the landlord business themselves are they?

6 Responses to “Michigan: More confirmation that refugee resettlement is an industry”

  1. magdears said

    I absolutely agreed with the statement the refugee settlements is an industry,that make few people richer and the already poor little cities and towns poorer. High Point NC is an example. For more than 4 years based on UN program with collaboration of CWS the little city had received an avalanche of Burmese Non
    political people without any skill whatsoever. But this is business too for school districts,which receive federal grants to create departments like Diversity with an organized globalist agenda with professional development courses for teacher in universities that also receive federal grants and donations from foreign countries
    See below
    From news magazine:
    ” in 1979, Saudi Aramco World magazine published a list of recent Middle Eastern gifts, including $200,000 from the Saudis to Duke University for a program in Islamic and Arabian development studies; $750,000 from the Libyan government for a chair of Arab culture at Georgetown University; and $250,000 from the United Arab Emirates for a visiting professorship of Arab history, also at Georgetown.”
    Yes, all this is a nasty,corrupted business that corrupt others,who participate on it!

    Like

  2. It’s legal human trafficking and it’s disgusting.

    Like

  3. cuchulaine said

    Semi-slave AND citizen exploitation. An excellent racket. Time to use RICO to prosecute.
    These morons don’t have a clue what criminality they are all about.

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  4. “They aren’t in the landlord business themselves are they?”

    I’d bet you a cup of coffee that they are. Unfortunately, churches are exempt from IRS-990 filing requirements so it’s really difficult to know. What I do know is that churches tend to own a lot of property left to them as planned giving. It’s a shame that every major denomination in the US has been corrupted by Federal resettlement (and other) money.

    Like

  5. Aquamarine said

    Are they taking money away from people that are on Social Security to help fund this?

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