Refugee Resettlement Watch

Brazil: JBS and another BIG MEAT company raided in tainted meat scandal

Posted by Ann Corcoran on March 18, 2017

So how does this affect you in America? It doesn’t directly, but it gives me another opportunity to educate new readers!

The story, which I first heard on my regular early morning scan of CNN, is about JBS, the Brazilian meat giant, that is changing American small cities because of it voracious desire for refugee labor!

Meatpacking companies get the cheap labor.  American towns get the cultural upheaval.

I took this photo of JBS headquarters in Greeley this past summer on my 6,000 mile tour of refugee-overloaded towns. JBS is a Brazilian owned company benefiting from cheap refugee labor. Our tax dollars (welfare) subsidize those wages, so our meat is not cheap!

For new readers I have contended for years that the US Refugee Admissions Program is more about supplying large global corporations with cheap/captive labor than it is about ‘humanitarianism.’ 

Wages are low and we (taxpayers) subsidize the workers’ families through welfare. What a business model!

JBS (BIG MEAT) and other companies it owns (BIG CHICKEN) are changing towns like Greeley, Colorado where a large influx of Somalis have moved to the area to work for the global corporation, or have been directly resettled there by federal refugee resettlement contractors.

Be sure to see this story by Bloomberg about BIG MEAT and the Trump refugee slowdown.

Although this happened in Brazil, it places, once again, front and center the question of our food safety!

From the New York Times (emphasis is mine):

Brazil’s Largest Food Companies Raided in Tainted Meat Scandal

RIO DE JANEIRO — Federal agents raided the operations of Brazil’s largest food companies on Friday over accusations that their employees oversaw a scheme that included bribing inspectors to allow rotten meals to be served in public schools and salmonella-contaminated meat to be exported to Europe.

The investigation by Brazil’s Federal Police, an agency similar to the F.B.I., deals yet another blow to the country’s business establishment, which is struggling to recover from colossal graft scandals around Petrobras, the national oil company, and Odebrecht, a huge construction company.

In the newest corporate scandal, investigators said that employees at two food-processing giants, JBS and BRF, paid federal inspectors to ignore the adulteration or expiration of processed foods.

Inspectors also falsified sanitary permits, and bribes were channeled to the Brazilian Democratic Movement Party of President Michel Temer, according to the authorities.

Rafael Cortez, a political scientist at Tendências, a consultancy in São Paulo, called the meatpacking inquiry “one more element that will add to the picture of political instability.” Brazil’s political establishment was already reeling from an array of other graft cases.

The meatpacking investigation also casts doubt on Brazil’s agribusiness industry, a relatively resilient pillar of the nation’s weak economy. JBS is one of the world’s largest meat producers, with the United States chicken processor Pilgrim’s Pride among its foreign subsidiaries. BRF is a major exporter of meat to the Middle East and Asia.

Continue reading here.

See my tag ‘meatpackers’ for many more stories on the industry that once paid a decent salary and employed Americans.

You should know that then Senator Jeff Sessions (now Trump AG) called out meatpacking lobbyists behind the ‘Gang of Eight’ amnesty legislation in 2013, here.

Endnote: If you live in a state with a lot of meatpackers/refugee labor, be sure to investigate how much your elected officials are getting in campaign donations from the meat/poultry companies.

One Response to “Brazil: JBS and another BIG MEAT company raided in tainted meat scandal”

  1. READ IT AND LEARN…IF you dare.

    The landmark Food Lion case

    Cover Story
    Page Number: 8
    Kristen Rasmussen

    Journalists who lie on employment applications to gain access to private facilities for newsgathering activities are not protected by the First Amendment and may be liable for trespass or other offenses, a federal appellate court ruled more than a dozen years ago in a ruling that remains the leading case on the issue.

    In November 1992, two ABC News producers obtained jobs at Food Lion grocery stores in North and South Carolina by submitting applications with false references, misrepresenting their educational and employment experiences on their résumés and omitting their current employment with the network. ABC broadcasted a report on “PrimeTime Live” alleging that Food Lion’s meat department at those stores required employees to engage in unsafe, unhealthy or illegal practices, including selling old meat that was washed with bleach to kill odor, selling cheese that had been gnawed by rats and working off the time clock.

    Each worked undercover only one or two weeks at the store, and while there used hidden cameras to secretly record grocery store employees treating, wrapping and labeling meat, cleaning machinery and discussing meat-department practices.

    Food Lion sued ABC in July 1995 in federal court in Greensboro, N.C., alleging fraud, breach of the duty of loyalty, trespass and unfair trade practices under North Carolina law. The chain argued that ABC used illegal newsgathering methods to obtain the information for the report.

    Click on the link to continue reading.

    The News Media and The Law, Spring 2012

    https://www.rcfp.org/browse-media-law-resources/news-media-law/news-media-and-law-spring-2012/landmark-food-lion-case

    Like

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