Refugee Resettlement Watch

Archive for the ‘Comments worth noting/guest posts’ Category

Guest column: Unlikely that today’s refugees will be like yesterday’s self-reliant immigrants to America

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 15, 2017

Reader Bob Enos sent us his thoughts after reading Ms. Wolfe’s paean (in Foreign Policy) to grandpa (in which the author takes the opportunity to, like all good Leftists, use hot button words to describe RRW).  See my post here with a link to “journalist” Lauren Wolfe’s opposition to the idea of “assimilation.”  (You may be able to get the Foreign Policy article the first time without registering.)

Enos tells us this:

The article penned by Ms. Lauren Wolf – a New York liberal presumably of Russian Ashkenazi Jewish extraction – for Foreign Policy magazine was yet another piece of revisionist history designed to obscure a 27 year-old change to immigration policy that the American public neither understood nor asked for.

In her fantasy depicting Russian Jewish immigrants as ethnic culturists fiercely holding on to cultural identity in contrast to the American “melting pot,” she conveniently omits the major difference between then and now: the concept of the “public charge.” Her ancestors entered the United States, as did mine, with three pre-conditions in place. One, they were represented by American citizens acting as sponsors – often a rabbi or parish priest. Two, private, unsubsidized housing had been arranged ahead of time. Three, the new immigrants had jobs arranged for them ahead of time. The concept was a simple one: entrance to the United States is a privilege, not a right. Freedom of opportunity provides the means to support oneself, to “sing for your supper,” and to pose no burden to your new home country.

Screenshot (981).png

In 2015, Enos spoke about refugees. Last time I checked this video had over 61,000 views. Read about it and watch it here: https://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/2015/07/14/minnesota-concerned-citizen-speaks-to-county-government-leaders-about-refugee-resettlement/

The Immigration Act of 1980 abandoned the 100+ year-old standard of the public charge – at least for refugees.

This is the story of my paternal grandparents, Manuel and Maria Ignacia, from the island of St. Michael, in the remote chain of archipelago islands called the Azores, 1,000 miles off the coasts of both Europe and America in the North Atlantic Ocean. The Portuguese language was spoken in the home. My grandfather worked full-time in the Glenwood Stove factory, and part-time for a local Jewish merchant and landlord, Mr. Steinberg, who rented apartment and sold home furnishings to “green horns” fresh off the boat. My grandparents were Roman Catholic, but Mr. Steinberg’s religion meant nothing to my grandparents. “Mr. Steinberg is like a god to us!”, my grandmother exclaimed, more than once.

Once my grandparents learned the ropes from Mr. Steinberg, they began investing their savings in their own tenement houses and became landlords. During World War II, they bought a meat market, selling what my “vo-vo” (Nana) called “midnight meat” – black-market meat sold out the back door, in the middle of the night, to circumvent rationing restrictions during the war. I’d often thought that, had my grandmother been born in the US about 50 years later, she would have been running General Motors.

Now, to the assimilation part of the story. As in many Portuguese homes in the area, there were four portraits adorning the living room walls. First, a portrait of Jesus Christ. Second, the Pope of the Roman Catholic Church. The church is at the center of family life in traditional Portuguese households. Third, a picture of Cardinal Umberto Medieros, the Archbishop of the Boston Diocese, the first Archbishop of an American Catholic diocese of Portuguese extraction. And last, a portrait of President John F. Kennedy.

One running quip was that Portuguese men preferred smoking Winston cigarettes and drinking Carling-Black Label beer, because the packaging contained the colors of the American flag.

Once, as a teenager, I asked vo-vo if she and voo-voo (grandpa) ever thought about returning home for a visit. She laughed at me; “Ai, cuzao (don’t ask)! Go where? Sao Miguel? Whadda you talkin’ about? I know what it looks like! THIS is our home!”

Enough said.

My grandparents never became citizens. I don’t know why. They were proud of the United States and grateful to be here. It could be that, Portugal having been ruled by a repressive military dictatorship for many years, my grandparents simply distrusted government. They never had a bank account. My grandmother accepted public assistance only once. A bureaucrat from city hall called her at home. Vo-vo was a widow by now. Vo-vo was asked if she would like 100 gallons of home heating oil for free. “Sure,” she replied. When my parents learned of this, they were mortified. They asked her, “why did you take that?” She laughed, “I didn’t ask for nothing. I didn’t call them, they called me!” Of city hall, she said they were idiots.

Both of my grandparents died in nursing homes, one at a time. They financed their nursing home stays with their own money. They came to the US with no money. They died in the US with no money. They left no money to bequeath; only mementos of sentimental value and memories. What they did leave, the really important stuff: opportunities for their progeny to thrive in the greatest land of opportunity the world has ever known.

Our family has been, and continues to be, grateful for the opportunities this wonderful social experiment called the United States has provided us. Today, my grandparents have one grandchild who is a retired Wall Street executive, one grandchild who is chief financial officer and treasurer for one of the most important technology companies in America, and a great-grandchild who graduated with honors from Yale University, and is an associate at the investment bank Goldman Sachs.

This story, my friends, is one that, sadly, is largely lost on the current crop of refugees, in my opinion.

And for those of my fellow Americans who insist that the current crop of refugees will blend in and thrive, no different than previous immigrant waves, I refer you to the caveat of every legitimate stock broker and investment advisor: “past performance is no guarantee of future returns.”

This post is filed in my Comments worth noting/guest posts category.

See another guest column by Mr. Enos about the issue of refugees and the public charge, here.

A refugee designation is the most desired form of entry to the US for wannabe immigrants because it is the only category where the immigrant is legally (there may be migrants receiving illegally) allowed to receive welfare within weeks of arrival.  In fact, the major job of the resettlement contractors is to get their assigned refugees enrolled at local welfare offices ASAP.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Comments worth noting/guest posts, Community destabilization, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Taxpayer goodies | Tagged: | 7 Comments »

Comment worth noting from St. Cloud, MN

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 14, 2017

Editor: From time to time I post comments more prominently that I think are important but would get little notice otherwise. This is a comment I received about my post two days ago, here.

From St. Cloud Guy:

I have lived in St Cloud for a long time and I can’t believe how fast the city is going down. The housing market in St. Cloud is falling way behind all the surrounding cities because of the excessive refugee population. Also the schools have become some of the worst ones in the entire state of Minnesota. The Star Tribune estimated over 30% of St Cloud Apollo High School is Somalian now and the other high school St. Cloud Tech has a larger refugee population in its area. They have only been coming to St. Cloud in large numbers the last decade and a half. What will happen in another 10 years? Plus all the extra kids they have? 80%?

St_Cloud_Somalis

It’s very upsetting and frustrating that St. Cloud was a nice normal town that we could raise families here and go to decent schools. Now that is all gone and we have to take huge losses to sell our houses to get out of here. I really wish we would have a say in this since tax money is used for it. We almost have to move out of state, because any decent size city in Minnesota has or is starting to have problems with excessive refugees and poverty.

I don’t care if people want to migrate here but we need to stop paying for it with our tax money and let them get over here on their own and take care of themselves. That’s what all our ancestors did and that’s what made America so strong. At least that way the people that do migrate here on their own will be hard working and motivated to live the American dream not just sit at home collecting welfare checks and having babies.

See more comments worth noting and guest posts, here.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Comments worth noting/guest posts, Community destabilization, diversity's dark side, Muslim refugees, Pockets of Resistance, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Stealth Jihad, Taxpayer goodies, Who is going where | Tagged: , , , , | 12 Comments »

Guest column: Feds shifting costs to states for refugee resettlement

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 8, 2017

Editor: From time to time we post guest commentary. This is from Joanne Bregman. As we refocus our efforts at the state and local level, because we can’t count on Washington, this is an effective argument for you to make on the state level.

This is about States’ rights!

(emphasis below is mine)

Federal Cost Shifting of the Refugee Resettlement Program

Background

In 1980 the federal government formalized the refugee resettlement program by passing the Refugee Act of 1980. There was no mandate to force states to participate in this program. Federal appropriations to provide for medical and cash assistance for newly resettled refugees, was authorized for 36 months. Refugees were and still are, first required to use state Medicaid programs if they are eligible, before federal medical assistance funds are used.

When the federal law was passed, it provided that for each refugee brought to a state by a federal contractor, states would be reimbursed 100% for three full years, the state incurred cost of providing Medicaid and cash welfare. The law also provided, that for refugees who did not meet eligibility criteria for state Medicaid and cash welfare programs, they could instead, receive a federal subsidy – Refugee Medical Assistance (RMA) and Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA) for 36 months.

By 1991, even though the number of refugees being resettled was not decreasing, the federal government eliminated reimbursement to states for the state cost of resettling and supporting refugees with Medicaid and cash welfare.

In addition, the federal government reduced the RCA and RMA subsidy from 36 months to 8 months for refugees who do not qualify for state funded programs. States have no other choice but to assume the greater share of the voluntary federal program’s costs.

Screenshot (936)

The U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement told Congress early on in the program that the reason states were no longer being reimbursed for the state’s costs was because Congress didn’t appropriate enough money.

The 1981 Select Commission on Immigration and Refugee Policy convened by Congress also documented that even the initial 3 years of 100% reimbursement to states, was not sufficient to “minimize the impact of refugees on community services.” The Commission was specifically referring to schools, hospitals and community support services.

In 1990, the U.S. General Accounting Office documented that the reduction in reimbursement to states for the federal refugee resettlement program, “costs for cash and medical assistance have shifted to state and local governments.” The National Governors Association has also questioned the federal cost shifting, stating that “[t]hese reductions represent a major federal policy change that shifts fiscal responsibility for meeting the basic needs of refugees from the federal government to states and localities.”

As the resettlement industry has grown, so has the cost to both federal and state governments but only the federal government controls its costs by appropriating annually “as available” while each state’s cost is driven by how much of the federal cost Congress chooses not to pay.

Be sure to see my post from earlier this past week about what you need to do on a state and local level, here.

This post is filed in my ‘What you can do’ category and in Comments worth noting.’

Posted in Changing the way we live, Comments worth noting/guest posts, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Taxpayer goodies, What you can do, Where to find information | Tagged: | 13 Comments »

Reader comment: What I learned about the SPLC over the years

Posted by Ann Corcoran on August 23, 2017

Editor: From time to time, I publish/feature (as posts) comments from readers that would otherwise be lost in the daily din.

SPLC

This is from Deena Flinchum (see a previous comment here) who enlightens us on the Southern Poverty Law Center and how they have evolved over the last 4 decades. (Emphasis is mine)

Ann, I sent this to a reporter and thought you might find it interesting:

The social philosopher Eric Hoffer, author of The True Believer, once said: “Every great cause begins as a movement, becomes a business, and eventually degenerates into a racket.” This has been my observation of the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).

In 1973, I received a fundraising letter from the SPLC signed by Julian Bond, an icon of the civil rights movement, asking me to become a retainer supporter, meaning I’d send a monthly payment to retain lawyers for African-Americans seeking to secure voting rights, access to schools and neighborhoods, etc. I readily agreed, sending in my monthly contribution for over 25 years. Never missed a single payment. I was gratified to see progress in a cause I believed in and to have a chance to be a part of it.

As time went by, I saw less and less civil rights work but the fundraising continued.

We were told that SPLC needed to put away a lot of reserves so that they could withstand loss of contributions, etc. In essence, SPLC had become a business, piling up retained earnings from contributions that they didn’t spend on the cause. I began to see more effort in hunting down ‘hate’ and less on suing entities on behalf of those whose civil rights were being violated. It costs a lot less to ship copies of Teaching Tolerance out to schools and libraries and to designate as ‘hate groups’ organizations that disagree with you on issues than it does to finance complex lawsuits. More money in the reserve fund!

The break for this old-line environmentalist came when SPLC entered its racket phase by declaring FAIR and CIS – two organizations that saw massive immigration as not a good thing for the US – to be ‘hate groups’. How can two very mainstream organizations, ones who shared the opinions of the Jordan Commission led by Congresswoman Barbara Jordan under President Bill Clinton, be classified in the same terms as the KKK and Nazis? Were Congresswoman Jordan and President Clinton ‘far-right haters’? Hardly. I stopped my support immediately and told SPLC why. I was left alone for years until after Trump’s election when, I guess, SPLC considered me fair game again. I’ve had about 4 letters since then wanting me to re-up. Hilarious!

No way. I look upon the SPLC the same as I do scammers who try to separate senior citizens from their savings by pretending to be good causes intent upon some good work or another if only the mark would come through with hard cold cash. Unfortunately too many still do.

I’m stunned that anybody in the media takes the SPLC seriously anymore after all of the exposure there has been about their dishonesty, discrimination in hiring, and simple greed. All they are doing with their ‘hate group’ designations is trying to shut down dissent or even discussion if it varies from their opinions. I firmly believe that a lack of discussion over the years because people were afraid of being smeared is what has led to a lot of the bitterness in the debate over immigration now.

See other comments and guest opinions by clicking here.

Posted in Comments worth noting/guest posts, free speech | Tagged: | 9 Comments »

Guest commentary: What you can say, when they say _____

Posted by Ann Corcoran on June 23, 2017

I’m asked all the time: What can I do?  What can I do?

This is an excellent example of the kind of thing you can do.  This is a list of talking points thoughtfully prepared by Brenda Arthur of the Charleston, WV Act for America chapter.  As a citizen activist, she put some serious time into preparing this point/counterpoint and made it available for all of you!

PROPONENTS OF REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT

WILL SAY :

1. Your town is losing population. Bringing refugees will revitalize your city.

+ Truth: Saying that Importing third world poverty into our city or state revitalizes it just defies logic and commonsense.

+The educational level of many refugees is low. They will only qualify for minimum or low wage jobs. Therefore, they will continue to qualify for some form of government assistance such as Medicaid and/or Food Stamps aka SNAP.

+ Big Business uses refugees for cheap labor thereby depressing wages for Americans with low education levels.

+ The cost of educating a refugee child is apprx $10,000+ per year not to mention the additional cost of English language assistance/interpreters and additional tutoring due to a lack of previous education.

+ Refugees often send some of their money out of the country to family left behind. Those remittances that leave the country are dollars unavailable to the local economy. This is never factored in.

+ As the refugee population grows more languages will be required to be provided by the school system. This erodes the quality of the schools and reduces teaching time for American kids whose parents are paying the bill.

+ In towns where the refugee population has grown, parents are finding 17-20 year-olds in class with their children.

+ Some school districts across the country have as many as 81 languages for which they must provide ESL teachers and interpreters.

2. Another selling point by the proponents is that “It is our moral obligation. That’s who we are as a country.”

+ Our tax dollars were never meant to be someone else’s charity .

+ We should aid refugees where they are. For every one brought here we can help 12 people there. The administration of mercy belongs to each of us individually—-not to the government.

+ Our first moral obligation is to our own people.

Arthur created this refugee crimes poster to use as a visual aid when she speaks to groups in West Virginia. You can do this too!

3. OVER 800,000 REFUGEES (since 9/11) HAVE BEEN ADMITTED TO THE U.S. AND NO TERRORIST PROBLEMS:

+ Proponents will present the picture that everything is “sweetness and light “. Not true. Many problems are occurring with refugee populations in towns all across America: Gangs, increased drug trafficking, sex slave trade, domestic violence, crime, drug resistant strains of TB, female genital mutilation, and more.

+ Cultural differences are often great and cannot be bridged. Some refugee cultures believe that “honor killing” and rape of non-muslim women is acceptable.

+ In addition, there have been terrorist acts committed by refugees as well as many crimes. Taxpayers pay for expensive trials, and for those who are sentenced we must bear the cost of imprisonment for many years.

4. NO STATE MONEY IS INVOLVED.

+ Yet another selling point of the proponents is that THERE IS NO STATE MONEY INVOLVED. IT’S ALL FEDERAL MONEY. WELL, FIRST OF ALL, FEDERAL MONEY IS OUR MONEY.  SECONDLY, LET’S DISCUSS THE STATE COSTS: MEDICAID , STATE EMPLOYEES, EDUCATION, INTERPRETERS, AND LIKELY CASH WELFARE PAYMENTS.

DON’T TELL ME OR ANYONE ELSE THERE IS NO STATE MONEY INVOLVED WITH THIS PROGRAM. It’s a matter of how much.

TO RECAP:

+ Medicaid–Unreimbursed cost to the state
+ TANF–Cash Welfare payments –Unreimbursed costs to the state
+ Interpreters–Provided to students and other refugees as needed
+ Education–Cost for educating children K-12
+ State Employees’ salaries and benefits who work w/refugees

5. The vetting is very, very rigorous.

+ Former FBI Director, James Comey, Obama’s Special Envoy to the Middle East to fight ISIS, General John Allen, Former Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, Mike McCaul, Chairman of Homeland Security in the Congress , and now we know from the leaked Wikileaks documents that even Hillary Clinton herself said at a private meeting in 2013 that the refugees cannot possibly be vetted.

+ Further, Leon Rodriguez, former Director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, reluctantly told former Senator Jeff Sessions’ Senate Committee in September 2016 that some of the refugees get in based solely on their testimony alone.

+ Fraud is rampant in the refugee program. Many refugees come from failed states. They have no documentation. We are supposed to believe the lie that everyone is who they say they are.

+ ISIS has sworn to infiltrate the refugee population. They already have.

6. The refugees become self-sufficient within 5 years.

+ The fact is that the Office Of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) defines self-sufficiency in a way that is contrary to the common understanding of the word. A household is considered self-sufficient if it is not receiving “a cash assistance grant”. But other welfare programs do not count under the ORR definition. Thus, ORR considers and reports them as self-sufficient even if they are receiving other forms of government assistance such as: Food Stamps (SNAP), Housing subsidies, or Medicaid .

Don’t be fooled. Make them define their terms.

7. Refugees pay taxes.

+ Consider that the average educational level of a Middle Eastern refugee is 10.5 years. That is not even a high school diploma. This means that the likelihood of them earning more than $9-$12 /hour is pretty unlikely. Having a low wage job is most likely. Further, even if they work and pay taxes the fact that the earnings level is low will often make them eligible for continuing government subsidies. There are other points to consider:

+ Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is available to people whose income is low. Many, if not most, refugees would likely qualify for this.

+ Child Tax Credit up to $1000 per child would apply based on income guidelines. This credit is IN ADDITION to deductions for dependent children.

+ Once the Tax Credits are applied it is possible that they are getting back all or most of the taxes that were paid and potentially more than they paid.

So, there we have it for those of you looking for something to do.  Use Arthur’s points for letters to the editor, arguing with ‘friends’ on facebook, or when corresponding with your elected officials.

This post is filed in two categories here at RRW:  ‘Comments worth noting’ (here) and in my new category ‘What you can do’ (here).

And, for all of you interested in Arthur’s home state of West Virginia, go here for my archive on the state.

Posted in Comments worth noting/guest posts, Refugee Resettlement Program, What you can do | Tagged: | 13 Comments »

Call your member of Congress/Senators to put brakes on refugee resettlement program

Posted by Ann Corcoran on June 19, 2017

Thanks to reader Denise for making a very cool flyer to remind you to call your Washington representatives to counter the lobbying campaign by the refugee industry this week.  They are ginning-up thousands of calls to Congress in advance of World Refugee Day tomorrow.

 

 

This is a very handy way to get the phone numbers for your representatives.  I just tried it, and in addition to my reps in Washington, I received phone numbers for my state reps too!

Post is filed in ‘What can you do’ because you asked!

Posted in Comments worth noting/guest posts, Refugee Resettlement Program, What you can do | Tagged: | 1 Comment »

Comment from a reader: Ann, your comments are “classless and offensive”

Posted by Ann Corcoran on April 29, 2017

This (below) is a comment (in response to Thursday’s post) that I received from a diehard Trump supporter, not the first to send a comment like this.

So let me be clear.  I have been writing about the UN/US Refugee Admissions Program for ten years come this July. I was also a Trump supporter from day one.  I even had an opportunity to tell him briefly what was wrong with the US Refugee Program in May of 2015.

Nancy took offense at my mention of Ivanka’s position on Syrian refugees. See what Ivanka (the expert) said about refugees: http://www.ajc.com/news/national/ivanka-trump-reportedly-differs-with-president-trump-syrian-refugees/Egi1VwnovaeRvmjllhwncN/

But, someone has to be willing to NOT PULL PUNCHES and tell the public where he is going wrong on this subject which I happen to know a lot about. (Just a tad more than Ivanka knows!)

For the umpteenth time, Trump did not have to include the US RAP in an Executive Order that was stopped by the judges. It is a separate issue from the ‘travel ban.’

The Trump team has the legal power to stop the flow of refugees altogether IF THEY WANTED TO!  (Now they have this handy excuse which Nancy has bought, hook, line and sinker—it is all about the judges!)

Using the liberal judges as as excuse, the Trump Administration is admitting an average number of refugees to the US at great expense to taxpayers and risking our security by including large numbers of unscreened Syrians, Iraqis, Afghans, Rohingya and Somalis. Nevermind that he said many times while campaigning for office that he wouldn’t do that!

I don’t want to hear anything about all the bigger issues Trump is dealing with!

There is nothing bigger than changing the demographic, cultural and religious makeup of America.  That is irreversible. 

We can fix Obamacare and our tax system AFTER immigration is controlled!

The most benign explanation for what, at the moment, appears to be a flip-flop by the Trump team is that they haven’t hired anyone tough enough to rein-in the bureaucrats at the Department of State (which doesn’t look good for Trump, the great manager, either!).

That is not to say, they won’t get their act together eventually, but right now someone has to tell them they are screwing up! 

Although I am not in her class, at least Ann Coulter is willing to tell Trump he is screwing up on immigration, in her case the wall with her new daily report on how many miles of the wall are being built each day—so far zero!

(See my report in the right hand sidebar of how many refugees Trump is admitting.)

Here is what Nancy and others (some more diplomatically) are telling me:

Shut up Ann, our man Trump can do no wrong!

Hi Ann,

While I enjoy your site, I do take exception to the Trump refugees article you posted. I think the same article should have been directed to the Ninth Circuit court, not Trump. It would appear to me that he has been trying …. and trying … to prevent this only to be thwarted again and again by a court that get’s literally 80% of it’s judgments overturned. Dare I say I’d get fired if only 20% of my work was accurate.

Also – the dig to Ivanka wasn’t fair either. Stop with the daddy comments – it’s classless and offensive. It should be beneath you to make such asinine comments. What she SAID was that it should be part of the discussion, not part of the solution. To me, a very diplomatic statement and perhaps way of getting a long-stalemated conversation going for real resolution. Perhaps you’re the dumb-dumb here.

My guidance is to stick to the issues and not the nonsense if you truly want resolution on this paramount matter. Thank you for listening

Regards Nancy

Thanks for listening Nancy!

One more thing, it is a wonderful thing to write a blog with no boss and for no financial gain to myself, because it doesn’t matter one bit to me whether I lose readers who don’t like what I say!

This post is filed in ‘Comments worth noting.’  Click here to see what other readers have said over the years.

Posted in Comments worth noting/guest posts, Refugee Resettlement Program, Trump Watch! | Tagged: | 72 Comments »

Comment worth noting: It might be too late for some American communities

Posted by Ann Corcoran on March 25, 2017

Editor:  This is a comment from reader ‘Seneca the Elder’ posted 4 days ago in response to this post.  I apologize for the late posting, I’ve been distracted by a family health issue (trying to squeeze in reading and posting between playing nurse).

From ‘Seneca the Elder’ “…it is kind of too late”

There have been a lot of missteps by the Trump administration when it comes to “refugees” aka invaders/migrants/barbarians/Third Worlders.

I understand that they have a lot on their plates, but immigration is probably THE most important issue for a lot of people. Especially those of us who live in or near a sanctuary city. Just yesterday I was walking around the one near me. Here I was in affluent Westchester County, walking around a small city that looked like it was in the slums of Ecuador or Guatemala. In violation of the City codes, the signs were in Spanish, not English. Judging by all the dish antennas on the roof and other parts of the houses, there were obviously half a dozen families living in many of the small, single family homes. The building inspectors and city employees are afraid of being called racists so they allow all the violations even though there have been fires where people lost their lives.

There are no more cute boutiques or specialty shops because all the store fronts have been taken by barber shops, dollar stores and hair salons (another zoning violation to have to many on one block) that are fronts for gambling, drug dealing and prostitution. Oh, and the roosters that you hear crowing in the distance are not from any farm- they are the ones the “immigrants” use for cock fighting, which has also made a comeback.

Sure, it’s not a no go zone like they have in Europe, but there are many blocks that I hesitate to walk down because of all the cat calls and nasty remarks made by the able bodied young men who hang around the barber shops which seem to be their main gathering place. It must be a third world cultural thing that these thugs are all getting their hair cut at 10-11 pm at night-there’s a lot of action at the barber shops for sure.

Most of the older families of Italian, Irish, Polish and European descent have left for the neighboring small towns where English is still the main language and the schools are better.

The liberal Dems who still live in the little city proudly send their kids to schools that are now 90% Hispanic and English is of course a second language. Taxes have gone up significantly to pay for all the help that the third world children and their parents need. I love it when I go to the local supermarket during the day and I see the wonderful families lined up to pay for their groceries. There’s young able bodied “dad”, young pregnant “mom” one kid in the carriage and another toddler holding on. Their hundreds of dollars worth of groceries are easily paid for with the latest benefit card that my tax dollars support.

So even if Trump & Co.. do everything right from here on out, for many places, even in our President’s own back yard, it’s kind of too late.

For more ‘comments worth noting’ from readers and guest opinion pieces, click here.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Comments worth noting/guest posts, Community destabilization, diversity's dark side, Refugee Resettlement Program, Trump | Tagged: | 21 Comments »

Comment worth noting: reader sends link for IRS on how to file complaints against non-profits

Posted by Ann Corcoran on March 5, 2017

“The Internal Revenue Service gives serious consideration to complaints made alleging the abuse of the tax exempt status granted to certain organizations.”

(IRS website)

 

Looking for a little project to do from the comfort of home…..

For those of you getting very annoyed by the ‘non-profit’ federal resettlement contractors (which get gobs of federal funding) increasingly involved in political organizing, a reader (‘badboylookout’) did a little research and sent us a link from the IRS on how you can complain about a possible misuse of their 501(c)3 status.  The nine VOLAGs *** and their subcontractors are especially active right now as we learned here (just one example).

It looks like you may never know if they are investigated, but it might make someone, somewhere take a look.

Go here for the page itself with hotlinks, and below is a shot of what you should know.

 

screenshot-402

 

You might also wish to complain to Inspectors General at the US State Department, the Department of Health and Human Services and the Dept. of Homeland Security (all three have involvement with the UN/US Refugee Admissions Program).

This post is filed in our ‘comments worth noting’ category, here.  And, in our ‘where to find information’ category, here.

***Go to this list to see if you have a non-profit VOLAG subcontractor near you.

Posted in Comments worth noting/guest posts, Refugee Resettlement Program, The Opposition, Where to find information | 1 Comment »

Comment worth noting: Shocked at what I saw in Lewiston, ME, and I love diversity

Posted by Ann Corcoran on February 15, 2017

Editor: If you visit RRW often, you know that we occasionally post comments (and guest opinion pieces) from readers. This was sent to our gmail account a few days ago and I wanted you to see it. I’ll make an observation at the end.

From someone whose family has lived in Lewiston for almost 100 years:

I just wanted to give you an update on what Refugee Resettlement can do to a city, Lewiston, ME is the home of my Grandparents, since the early 20’s, yes the 1920’s.

Most of my siblings were born in and around Lewiston, as well as my Mother, aunts, uncles, cousins, etc.

somali-protester-lewiston

Protesting the Somali flow to Lewiston as early as 2002! http://www.cbsnews.com/news/somali-immigrants-rile-maine-mayor/

I was really surprised when I returned after being away for about 20 years, to see the Somalian refugees in the town. I don’t mind other people, but the sheer numbers of people, then I spoke to my cousins who have lived there all their lives, and they explained the issues of crime, school violence, poverty, rejection of American values, and the general hatred of women by the Somali refugees.

They kept saying, we can’t get out here to look at a location where family used to live, and how the area had really gone down hill since the refugees arrived. Some of my cousins were victims of violence from Somali Gangs, and that the schools were in shambles because they couldn’t handle the language and culture issues that arise when you dump 15,000 Somali’s on a small town in Maine.

The destruction is irreversible, and horrific, I cried when I saw some of the town and how much it had changed. For example Kennedy park was a beautiful place where my Mom and sisters went to picnic and how nice it was. We were told to stay in the car because Somali drug dealers had taken over the park, and it wasn’t safe.

This type of immigration, the dumping of large numbers of refugees, does not work, it doesn’t help integration. I’m from Orange County California, I went to school with Mexican Gangs, who had their territory, Vietnamese gangs that arrived in large numbers in the 70’s and Korean Gangs that had arrived in the 60’s. Immigrants do not integrate when we drop them in large numbers, it doesn’t work, they don’t integrate.

I love the diversity of America, I am the product of immigrants, but all you have to do is look at what we have done in the past to see that mass integration [does he mean mass immigration?—ed] does not work. We need to drop these immigrants in small numbers across America so they can integrate and become part of the culture instead of allowing them to cluster in large numbers which means that integration will be slow if at all.

My thoughts on this issue of numbers and integration…

First, the Open Borders Left wants to use the word ‘integration’ rather than the word ‘assimilation,’ see here.

But, more importantly readers should know that refugees move in America—especially Somalis who got to Lewiston many years ago after they ‘discovered’ Maine’s generous welfare (see here).

Somalis can be placed (and they are) all over America by the resettlement contracting agencies, but often quickly move to be with their own kind of people in Minneapolis, Columbus, Seattle, San Diego, Lewiston and elsewhere.

So for all of you pushing for your governors to block resettlement (it will help some), remember though that you can’t stop secondary migration!

Say for example, the Refugee Admissions Program eventually allows certain states (governors) to stop the placement of refugees in their states, and say Vermont wants refugees and New Hampshire doesn’t, then they will place them in Vermont, but then encourage them to move over to New Hampshire after a few months. Likewise as Minnesota opens its arms to more Somalis they will eventually drift in to neighboring states! (Hijra!)

So, yes, integration/assimilation can’t happen when ethnic enclaves build in certain cities, but…..

The real problem, in my opinion, is that the overall numbers being admitted to the US are too high!

We need an immigration time out!

This post is filed in our ‘comments worth noting/guest posts’ category, here.  Our Lewiston archive is here.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Comments worth noting/guest posts, Community destabilization, Crimes, diversity's dark side, Muslim refugees, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Who is going where | Tagged: , , | 15 Comments »

 
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