Refugee Resettlement Watch

Archive for the ‘Other refugees’ Category

Concord, NH: Bhutanese refugees’ religious ceremony draws neighbors’ ire

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 17, 2015

I’m running out of time this morning after writing so much about Allentown, PA, but want to get a few more things posted before I have to move on to other of life’s duties.

Over a week ago a large gathering of Bhutanese refugees disturbed a quiet Concord neighborhood with chanting, large numbers of people and traffic.  The original story is here at the Concord Monitor.  One resident put a “GO HOME” sign in a window.

That story was followed by an apology of sorts from one of the Bhutanese refugees involved.  But interestingly he blamed the federal refugee contractor for not giving the former UN camp residents, the Hindu Bhutanese, a sufficient cultural orientation.

For new readers, we have now resettled over 80,000 Bhutanese refugees from camps in Nepal (they are really Nepali people that Nepal didn’t want back once they were expelled from Bhutan).   The UN wanted to clean out the camps (the plan was very controversial because many did not want to be “scattered to the four winds” as they said at the time).


People ask me all the time—who are these Bhutanese? Here is a map of Bhutan and Nepal. The so-called Bhutanese refugees were living for 20 years or so in UN camps in Nepal. The UN wanted to clean out the camps so we said o.k. and now more than 80,000 are scattered throughout America. They are not Muslims.

The Bush Administration decision to resettle 60,000 in the US was made by former Maryland candidate for Governor Ellen Sauerbrey who was the Bush Asst. Sec. of State for PRM.  As I said, we are now up to 80,000 and they are still coming.

Don’t forget readers that the Refugee Admissions Program is 35 years old and Republicans like George W. Bush enthusiastically helped this migration of third worlders to America.

We have a very lengthy archive on the Bhutanese resettlement going back to 2007, learn more by clicking here.   Pay attention to stories about the high suicide rate of the Bhutanese people in America.

So back to the Concord news.  This is PRAJA SHAPKOTA writing a sort-of apology for the disruption in the neighborhood, here (see photo!).

I feel concerned with the discontentment generated due to the religious ceremony in the Heights neighborhood of Concord (Monitor front page, Oct. 7).

As a member of the community in Upstate New York, I wish to express my personal viewpoints with some background information.

We the Bhutanese people of Nepali ethnicity have come to the United States after persecution and eviction by the absolute monarchy of Bhutan from 1985 to 1995. We have spent more than 18 years in crowded refugee camps of Nepal in uncertainty when Nepal was undergoing political metamorphism.

The refugee camps strengthened family and neighborly bonds with higher interpersonal interactions, which has become a community culture. What we see and do shapes our ways of life – our very culture.

We primarily follow the Hindu traditions, and for a family a lengthy religious function is once or twice in a generation. In case of Rudra Timsina, the function was a way of sharing joy with the community after buying a house – the achievement of a dream. Most invitees attend the discourses and cultural activities at least once in seven days as this is also a method to socialize among people with cultural and language barriers.

Such people constitute more than 50 percent in our community – illiterate in English and unaware of the American culture and traditions. We have never lived with people of totally different culture. Hence, this is a case of “conflict of culture and outlook” and not a conflict of community.


….in my opinion, the resettlement agencies with local community organizations should initiate at least a month of group orientation on the various aspects of American culture, such that a “conflict of culture” can be lessened.

I’ve had complaints from some of our readers about the large number of Bhutanese refugees in their communities.  At least this writer is sensitive to the disruption created in this Concord situation.

Who is bringing the Bhutanese to Concord?

Go here to the handy list, and see that three federal refugee contractors are dividing up the pie in the same office in Concord (Church World Service, Episcopal Migration Ministries and Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service).  Manchester, NH has been overloaded so now it looks like they are busy little beavers colonizing Concord.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities | Tagged: , , | 8 Comments »

Sec. of State John Kerry: Climate refugees our next move to erase borders

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 10, 2015

Thanks to reader Joanne for sending us this bit of news from one-worlder John Kerry. Kerry must be so thrilled to combine two of the the Left’s favorite pet propaganda campaigns—global warming and refugees.

It is not “new” as Kerry claims, we have an entire category devoted to so-called ‘climate refugees,’ go here (46 previous posts) for more of this nonsense.


Climate refugees coming to a town near you? I love this illustration! It comes from Diplo (

From Breitbart:

Secretary of State John Kerry warns the world that more and more people will be fleeing the devastation caused by global warming. “It’s something new. We have climate refugees today,” he said during a town hall event about the oceans.

Kerry described climate refugees as people who had to leave their homes because of drought, rising sea levels, and thawing permafrost.


International organizations, like the United Nations, he admitted, would have to codify the term “climate refugee” and put it into law. That would grant special immigration privileges to immigrants claiming refugee status, allowing them to move to other countries.

“I think it’s just a matter of time before it fits in under a category and countries have — and the refugee process has legitimately incorporated it into our policy,” Kerry said.

For anyone interested, there has been a huge controversy between the environmentalist ‘climate refugee’ pushers and the ‘humanitarian refugee’ establishment over definitions.  If you go to earlier posts in my ‘climate refugee category’ you will see what I mean.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Climate refugees, Colonization, Community destabilization, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Taxpayer goodies, The Opposition | Tagged: , | 6 Comments »

Cuban “refugee” numbers ticked up dramatically when Obama announced normalization of relations with Cuba

Posted by Ann Corcoran on August 17, 2015

Once Obama announced that we were going to be on good terms with Communist Cuba, I wondered what it would mean for the tens of thousands of so-called Cuban refugees we have been taking in over recent years.

I would think the whole Cuban resettlement would come to a grinding halt since love was in the air between our country and theirs.

Generated by IJG JPEG Library

Sec. of State John Kerry in Cuba last week. We are now pals with the Cuban government. So this should mean that no more ‘refugees’ need to come to the US from Cuba! Right!

Apparently Cubans wanting out saw the writing-on-the-wall and expedited their travel to America.

Here, according to Breitbart (hat tip: Joanne):

The United States is experiencing a massive surge in the number of Cuban refugees risking their lives to reach American shores, following President Obama’s announcement that the White House would legitimize the communist Castro regime by reestablishing diplomatic relations.

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol is reporting that 23,978 Cuban refugees arrived in the United States between October 2014 and May 2015, with another 3,564 Cubans attempting and failing to reach U.S. shores. Most of those arriving successfully crossed the southern border with Mexico or crossed the straits of the Caribbean separating Florida from Cuba. The number of Cubans arriving in the past eight months is significantly larger than the number that reached the United States throughout all of the 2014 fiscal year: 22,162.

In January, officials reported experiencing a major spike in Cuban refugee migration between December 2014 and January 2015, in the immediate aftermath of President Obama’s announcement of normalization of relations with the Cuban regime. Coastal officials recorded a 60% increase in the number of Cubans traveling to the United States in the last trimester of 2014, but a 117% increase in migration when comparing December 2013 and December 2014.

Read it all.

I know from past research that the US Conference of Catholic Bishops is paid (by you) to help the Cubans resettle, but I think others of the nine contractors get a cut of the federal dole to help bring Cubans to your towns.

Posted in Colonization, Community destabilization, Obama, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Taxpayer goodies, Who is going where | Tagged: , , | 4 Comments »

Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society can’t find enough housing in San Fran for gay ‘refugees’ (from South Africa)

Posted by Ann Corcoran on July 30, 2015

Ho hum!  So we are bringing refugees from the highly touted welcoming-to-all “Rainbow Nation” of South Africa, dropping them off in San Francisco and now whining about how there isn’t enough housing for them.  Maybe one of the well-paid staffers at the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS) might welcome this gay refugee to their home!

A long sob story at the Bay Area Reporter:


Isn’t HIAS PAID to take care of the refugees it resettles? Why is San Francisco gay refugee saying this: “In the U.S. I am facing homelessness,” Mayema told the Bay Area Reporter in a recent interview. “I don’t want to end up on the streets.”

“Our biggest challenge in helping these people is to find housing for them,” said Amy Weiss, the director of refugee and immigrant services at Jewish Family and Children’s Services of the East Bay. “They come with no employment history and no housing history. San Francisco is hard enough to find housing if you have an income. It is a huge problem for us and for them and to anybody resettling refugees.”

The agency is believed to be the only one in the country that has developed a specific program to work with LGBT refugees. It began four years ago when a number of Iranian LGBT refugees, who had fled to Turkey, needed help resettling in the U.S.

Since then the agency has worked with a number of LGBT refugees, mostly gay men from Africa and the Middle East. In November Junior Mayema arrived from Capetown, South Africa, where he had fled five years ago from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Then look at this, even the UN High Commissioner for Refugees refers to the attack (the star of this story claimed he suffered) as an “alleged attack.” So, he was resettled in America even though it was never proven he was attacked in S. Africa?

UNHCR staff, after learning about Mayema’s alleged attack, referred his case for resettlement last summer. Four months later, according to the account, he was granted refugee status and, in November, arrived in the Bay Area where he received assistance from the Jewish agency and a local church-sponsored group in acclimating to his new surroundings.

And, by the way, as we admit hundreds of refugees from the supposedly welcoming country of South Africa, you can bet there are few if any persecuted white people in the group.  I wonder if a white person pretended to be gay or lesbian and said he or she was attacked, could they get in to the US from South Africa?

The sob story goes on and on, continue reading here.  It is largely a play for more taxpayer money!

Posted in Africa, Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Taxpayer goodies, Who is going where | Tagged: , , | 4 Comments »

Learn more about how communities are chosen to ‘welcome’ LGBT refugees

Posted by Ann Corcoran on July 26, 2015

rainbow welcome initiativeWe have written on this topic occasionally over the years.  Although the feds never say it, gays are persecuted throughout the Middle East and Africa by adherents of the ‘religion of peace,’ and as we learned just this weekend they are also not given special rights in Obama’s ancestral country of Kenya.

Meanwhile Russian gays are flooding to the US and seeking asylum (see our previous posts here).

It should be no surprise then that the Office of Refugee Resettlement has published guidance on how to decide where to send them in the US.

From CNS News:

( – The Obama administration has introduced homosexual rights policies across federal agencies, including at the Health and Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement website, which links to a guide that rates placement providers and communities on LGBT-friendly services, including having “culturally competent mental health providers” and “LGBT-affirming places of worship.”

The eight-page guide — published by the homosexual refugee advocacy organization Heartland Alliance International in 2013 and entitled the “Rainbow Welcome Initiative” — is designed like a scorecard that allows agencies and service providers to use a point system to rate refugee programs and communities on acceptance of the LGBT lifestyle.

Continue here for more information and to follow links.

See more about ORR’s ‘Rainbow Welcome Initiative’ here.

Posted in Asylum seekers, Changing the way we live, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Who is going where | Tagged: | 4 Comments »

Montana: Colombian refugee charged with sexually assaulting child

Posted by Ann Corcoran on March 24, 2015

Whew!  This story from the Bozeman Daily Chronicle (hat tip: Paul) gives me an opportunity to mention two things.  First Montana takes only a few refugees a year and second did you know we were taking “refugees” from Colombia?  I did, but rarely do we see anything in the news about that stream of refugees to America.

Five months into fiscal year 2015, we have resettled 273 “refugees” from the South American country of Colombia.  How this guy got to Montana as a cleaning contractor, from Arizona where he supposedly has a family, remains a mystery.  Do cleaning contractors send teams out to other states?  Is there no one in Montana willing to clean?

Here is the US Conference of Catholic Bishops’ pitch on why we need to bring Colombians to America.

From the Bozeman Daily Chronicle:

Barreiro-Guerrero with translator. Remember “welcoming” communities! You pay for the translators!

A man accused of sexually assaulting a young girl in a grocery store bathroom over the weekend was ordered held in jail Monday on $500,000 bail.

Johnny Barreiro-Guerrero, 39, has been charged with felony sexual assault, felony assault on a minor and misdemeanor indecent exposure. Gallatin County Justice Court Judge Bryan Adams set Barreiro-Guerrero’s bail.


The alleged victim, a 7-year-old girl, said that when she was in the bathroom, Barreiro-Guerrero kissed her, held her against a wall and touched her sexually. She said during the encounter, Barreiro-Guerrero also unzipped his pants and showed her his penis.

At the store, officers contacted Barreiro-Guerrero, who matched the description given by the girl. Barreiro-Guerrero only speaks Spanish, so a translator assisted a detective during an interview.

Barreiro-Guerrero, who identified himself as a Columbian refugee, said he was in the women’s bathroom cleaning when he heard the girl come in. He said he didn’t leave when the girl entered and he saw her wash her hands. [He claims not to have touched her—ed]


During Barreiro-Guerrero’s court appearance Monday, Gallatin County Deputy Attorney Jesse Bushnell requested the $500,000 bond.

Bushnell called Barreiro-Guerrero a “danger to the community” and said the “randomness” of the offense and the age of the alleged victim warranted a high bond.

Bushnell also said that Barreiro-Guerrero is a flight risk. He has no ties to Montana and had a plane ticket scheduled to leave the state Monday, Bushnell said.

Remember stories like this one when the feds promise you that refugees are very carefully screened!

Posted in Crimes, diversity's dark side, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, South America, women's issues | Tagged: , , , | 2 Comments »

Obama’s new program to create ‘refugees’ in Central America to be discussed in teleconference later this month

Posted by Ann Corcoran on March 22, 2015

These are the train routes taken by the “children” last summer. Obama’s new plan is supposedly designed to keep the ‘unaccompanied alien children’ off the trains and put them into planes (airfare paid by you) with direct flights to cities across America. Map here:



The federal government is inviting you to a teleconference later this month to answer questions about the plan to bring kids directly from Central America to the US as refugees which then (as newly-minted refugees) will have all forms of welfare available to them, can bring family in later and become US citizens.   We told you about it in February.

Note that the media is not invited!

Dear Stakeholder,

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), in coordination with the U.S. Department of State (DOS), invites you to participate in a teleconference on Tuesday, March 31, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. (Eastern) to learn more about the Central American Minors (CAM) Refugee/Parole Program. The program provides certain children in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras with a safe, legal, and orderly alternative to the dangerous journey that some children are undertaking to the United States.


The CAM program began accepting applications from qualifying parents in the U.S. for their children on December 1, 2014. Only certain qualifying parents who are legally present in the U.S. are eligible to file for their children. Each qualified child must be unmarried, under the age of 21, and residing in El Salvador, Guatemala or Honduras. In certain cases, the in-country parent of the qualifying child may also qualify for access if the in-country parent is the legal spouse of the qualifying parent in the U.S.


During this teleconference, representative from USCIS and DOS will provide an overview of the CAM program and answer questions.


To Join the Session by Phone

On the day of the session, please use the information below to join the teleconference.
We recommend that you call 10-15 minutes before the start time.

Toll-free call-in number: 1-888-606-7035

Passcode: CAM


Note to Media: This engagement is not for press purposes. Please contact the USCIS Press Office at (202) 272-1200 for any media inquiries.

If you have any questions, please email us at

We look forward to engaging with you!

  • CAM National Engagement Invite_ 3 31 15.pdf


Consider signing up!  Tell us what you learn!

Learn more about Obama’s plan to seed your communities with diversity.

Our extensive archive on the so-called ‘Unaccompanied minors’ is here58,000 of these minors came in 2014 alone!

Posted in Colonization, Community destabilization, Immigration fraud, Obama, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Taxpayer goodies, Who is going where | Tagged: | 4 Comments »

Cubans speeding up arrival in US, fear possible change in law

Posted by Ann Corcoran on January 23, 2015

Getting away from Muslim migrants for a moment, we have a story this morning about how federal refugee resettlement contractor (one of the big nine***), Church World Service, helps Cubans who are ECONOMIC migrants, not refugees, get settled in America.

Miguel Laguna, a caseworker at Church World Service, a refugee resettlement agency, runs an orientation class about life in the US for a newly arrived Cuban family. Credit: Monica Campbell

I’ve been wondering lately what Obama’s change in US/Cuban relations will have on the thousands and thousands of Cubans still arriving in the US under that ridiculous “wet foot, dry foot” policy.

If we normalize relations with Cuba, why would there be any “refugees” coming here?  Or, will his policy simply open the pipeline completely for one and all to fly right in?

A refugee by definition is escaping persecution.  People wanting a job and social services are economic migrants and not eligible for refugee status (unless you are Cuban of course).

They are coming here for American jobs!  Remember! Your tax dollars pay for most of the services of Church World Service!  See how much here.

Here is the story from (emphasis below is mine):

Forget for a second that you live in the United States, that you know its laws, know English, know what a Social Security number is, let alone worrying about having one.

Now imagine that’s the wave of information you are trying to absorb, quickly, in a small conference room in Miami. That’s exactly what happens to some families when they arrive in the United States.

Miguel Laguna helps guide them through the bewildering process. He’s a caseworker at Church World Service, a refugee resettlement agency with an office in the Miami area. Most of the Miami office’s clients are Cubans. [Miami office website is here–ed]

Laguna goes over with the family how to take the bus, apply for citizenship and where to study English. It’s a lot to take in.


Ramos sits with his wife, Ailén, and his son, also named Ismael. The family tells me it took two days and two nights in a small boat to reach Florida. They got lost in the Gulf of Mexico, but eventually made it. “The GPS broke, so we didn’t know where we were for a while,” Ailén says.

They say they left Cuba because there’s no work there. Ailén says she was a gym teacher making $12 a month, a pretty typical salary in Cuba. The family thought of leaving for years, but sped up their plans for fear that the United States’ unique and controversial “wet foot, dry foot” policy might disappear.

That policy says that Cuban migrants who make it to shore — “dry foot” — won’t be sent back, and will essentially be granted US residency after a year and one day in this country. The original intent was to drain the best and brightest from communist Cuba by dangling US visas, so some Cubans worry that better US-Cuba relations will lead to a change in policy.

Only Congress can make changes to “wet foot, dry foot,” and that could take a while. But the rumors that the policy might disappear persist in Cuba, and a rising number of people are leaving the island for the US on boats or, in some cases, by land through Latin America.


Laguna does note that this family has an advantage: They have relatives living in Miami. For Cuban refugees who arrive alone, there’s a lot of uncertainty.


I ask them why they left Cuba. They all say similar thing: “the economy,” “jobs,” “no work.”

It’s an answer that fuels a growing argument: Why treat Cubans differently than Guatemalans who flee gangs and poverty? What about Mexicans wanting to send money back to their relatives back home, or people fleeing war and repression elsewhere who must petition for asylum in the United States? Why give Cubans a special pass?

Of course what they are working up to is not changing the fact that Cubans get a pass with special treatment, but they want every other person in the world who needs a job or is fleeing crime to get the same pass without that messy business of applying for asylum!

By the way, we make 20,000 slots available every year IN CUBA for truly persecuted people, they don’t have to take risky voyages!  Those taking the risky trip are job seekers—economic migrants!

It was Church World Service’s role in the county where I live that is responsible for the birth of this blog.

*** For new readers, these are the nine major federal resettlement contractors:


Posted in Changing the way we live, Community destabilization, Legal immigration and jobs, Obama, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Taxpayer goodies, Who is going where | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

Can we get some French Jews as refugees?

Posted by Judy K. Warner on January 13, 2015

A Washington, D.C., rabbi says The U.S. should open its doors to imperiled European Jews.  In a post at the Washington Post today, Rabbi Shmuel Herzfeld writes:

As the world rightly focuses on the recent terror attacks in Paris on Charlie Hedbo and a kosher grocery store, it should be noted that the second attack is part of a larger problem: the ongoing vitriol toward the French Jewish community.

On Sunday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and other Israeli leaders invited French Jews to move to Israel. That’s a nice gesture, but it’s not enough. The United States should join Israel and offer to also open up its shores as a refuge to the endangered Jews of France.

He tells about his visits to France and the danger Jews are in if they wish to live openly as Jews.

When I speak with Jews in France today, I feel the return of a grave danger to Jews that has arisen too often in Europe. My father ran from the Nazis and, as a toddler, hid in the ditches of the French countryside to escape deportation and almost certain death. More recently, we remember the brutal killing of Ilan Halimi, the son of Jewish Moroccan immigrants, in January 2006…. during my recent visit to France, people mentioned Ilan Halimi’s name as a turning point for the Jews of France and as a harbinger of the tension that followed.

We must work toward saving France’s Jews before it is too late. Many French Jews are moving to Israel; more than 7,000 Jews from France have moved there this past year. Yet Israel’s existence as a refuge does not absolve the rest of the world from doing whatever is possible to save the Jews of France.

So how about it?  Can French Jews seek asylum here?  Or do refugees to the U.S. have to be destitute, low-skill, and a burden to the taxpayer?  Let’s invite refugees who are educated, skilled, self-supporting, and an all-around benefit to our country — the Jews of France and any other European country where they are in danger.



Posted in Asylum seekers, Other refugees | Tagged: | 15 Comments »

First Bhutanese refugee advocacy day on Capitol Hill; they would like Congress to help them get home

Posted by Ann Corcoran on November 24, 2014

In 2007, just as RRW was getting off the ground, the Bush Administration said that the US would “welcome” 60,000 Bhutanese (mostly Hindu) here over 5 years (read one of many accounts, here).

We are now up to 80,000 of the Bhutanese (really Nepali people) who were booted out of Bhutan after living there for a generation or two.  Nepal didn’t want its ethnic people back, so they lived in UN-run camps on the edge of Nepal before Bush said, let them come (The contractors need ‘clients’ and we need more docile laborers anyway!  Bush didn’t exactly say that, but that is the reality).

Their arrival here was traumatic for many and news is plentiful about their hardships in the land whose streets are (NOT!) paved with gold.  Their high rate of suicide in the US has not gone unnoticed by health officials (here is one recent story on that subject).

Refugees as pawns!

When I saw this news, my first reaction was ho-hum now they want some special favors for their people, so I was surprised to see that they want the US to pressure Bhutan to let some of them return to Bhutan from the camps and to let some of those resettled here to return as well! 

This is not the first time we have seen “refugees” beg to go home after they learned the harsh reality of life in America.  (See a post from 2010 here about how we brought thousands of Kosovars here in 1999, paid resettlement contractors to get them ‘settled,’ and then airlifted them ‘home’ within a year).

There is no incentive to slow the flow!

In 1999, the contractors were in need of warm bodies (they are paid by the head to resettle refugees and it is the need for the continuous cash flow that keeps this whole scheme afloat)  and so they pressured the Clinton Administration to bring them some paying customers.  Frankly, I think this is the same thing that happened with the Bhutanese and I always wondered why the mighty US (and the bullies at the UN) couldn’t financially pressure Bhutan and Nepal to repatriate their people instead of undertaking a hugely expensive resettlement of an entire population and then scattering them across the US and destroying their culture.

From Business Standard:

For the first time in the US Congress, the Bhutanese American Advocacy Day has been celebrated.

There are around 80,000 Bhutanese refugees in the US.

Organised by the Hindu American Foundation (HAF) early this week on November 17, the first-of-its-kind event featured a congressional briefing along with meetings with the State Department and several House and Senate offices, the foundation said in a statement.

Life isn’t so good in America, we want to go home!

The Bhutanese delegation also asked the State Department and members of Congress to assist in applying multilateral diplomatic pressure on Bhutan to repatriate refugees remaining in the camps of Nepal as well as those resettled in other countries who long to return to their ancestral homeland.

Panelists sought to educate policy makers on the challenges endured by Bhutanese Hindus resettling here in the US, as well as the ongoing human rights concerns in Bhutan.

Bhutanese Hindu refugees living in major cities throughout the US are facing a number of challenges, including a high incidence of mental illness and suicide, trouble obtaining employment and difficulty in retaining their cultural and religious traditions.

Thanks to Obama, their difficulty in finding employment will only get harder as they compete with 5 million newly legalized aliens.

See our extensive archive on the Bhutanese, hereThe resettlement is now winding down just as the Syrians will become the next favored group.  At least the Bhutanese are not Muslims!

Posted in Community destabilization, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Taxpayer goodies, Who is going where | Tagged: | Comments Off on First Bhutanese refugee advocacy day on Capitol Hill; they would like Congress to help them get home


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