Refugee Resettlement Watch

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    Ann Corcoran
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    Fairplay, MD 21733

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Archive for the ‘Other refugees’ Category

Trump on pace to break Bush record of lowest refugee resettlement numbers since 1980 law enacted

Posted by Ann Corcoran on April 3, 2018

Trump and Bush

Bush (so far) holds the record for low refugee admission years:  Bush admitted 27,070 in 2002 and 28,117 in 2003

We have now reached the six month mark of the first full fiscal year of the Trump presidency and Trump could easily break the Bush record set in 2002 of 27,070 refugee admissions for one year.

(See post here on the Bush record low years.)

At the six month mark, the Trump Administration operating well under a CEILING of 45,000 refugees, is at 10,548 admitted so far.

Assuming that rate continues for the next six months, Trump could be at 21,000 (give or take a few) for the year, handily smashing President Bush’s record.

Since the nine federal contractors*** are paid on a refugee per head basis for placing the refugees in your towns and cities, they surely are taking big hits to their budgets.

Here is a map from Wrapsnet of where those 10,548 have been placed. Wyoming is the only state in the nation that never signed up to ‘welcome’ refugees and for some unexplained reason, Hawaii gets very few even though the government there has said they welcome diversity!

 

map top

 

Screenshot (354)

Sorry numbers are not clearer. They aren’t very clear at the website itself.

 

Top ten resettlement states are in descending order: OH, TX, NY, WA, CA, PA, AZ, NC, GA, and MN.

Admissions by month for the last ten+ years (Wrapsnet):

 

wrapsnet by month

 

The top sending countries so far in FY18 are:

DR Congo (2,569)

Bhutan (1,925)

Burma (1,769)

Ukraine (1,176)

Eritrea (760)

Muslim numbers drastically reduced to 16% of total.

In recent years the Muslim refugees accounted for sometimes as close to half of all refugee admissions. As of April 1, of the 10,548 admitted, 1,725 are Muslims of one sect or another.  (Data maintained at Wrapsnet)

Significant numbers of Muslims are coming in the Burma and DR Congo flow.

Let the President know what you think!

Contact the President by clicking here.

 

*** The number in parenthesis is the percentage of the nine VOLAGs’ income paid by you (the taxpayer) to place the refugees, line them up with (low paying) jobs in food production and cleaning hotel rooms, and get them signed up for their services!  From most recent accounting, here.

As long as the nine contractors are paid largely by you via Congress and the US Treasury, and then act as community organizing/political agitators, there will never be serious reform of the UN/US Refugee Admissions Program.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Muslim refugees, Other refugees, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Trump Watch!, What you can do, Where to find information, Who is going where | Tagged: , | 7 Comments »

GAO: Huge numbers of Special Immigrant Visa holders not finding work

Posted by Ann Corcoran on March 23, 2018

But a big problem, says the Government Accountability Office , is that neither the US State Department or the Office of Refugee Resettlement in HHS are doing much to track the outcomes of those admitted to the US from Iraq and Afghanistan who supposedly worked for us as interpreters.

GAO logo 2

I told you here recently that the number admitted to the US from those two violent countries is pushing 70,000 in the last ten years.

As Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) holders they are treated as full-fledged refugees with all the welfare benefits other refugees receive.

We have been told that the resettlement contractors*** are relying on these paying clients to keep federal dollars flowing to their budgets as the refugee flow they hoped for is not materializing.

Some members of Congress must have requested this GAO study because problems are obviously brewing with this portion of our ‘welcome’ to Middle Eastern Muslims.  I did not read the whole report, here, but it seems that there are some pretty disillusioned SIVs who thought they would have good jobs and decent housing when they got here.

Here are a few snips from the summary:

Not exactly a bombshell title:

AFGHAN AND IRAQI SPECIAL IMMIGRANTS: More Information on Their Resettlement Outcomes Would Be Beneficial

 

What GAO Found

Since fiscal year 2011, about [about?—ed] 13,000 Afghan and Iraqi nationals (excluding family members) have resettled in the United States under special immigrant visas (SIV), but limited data on their outcomes are available from the Department of State (State) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). State collects data on SIV holders’ resettlement outcomes once—90 days after they arrive. GAO’s analysis of State’s data from October 2010 through December 2016 showed that the majority of principal SIV holders—those who worked for the U.S. government—were unemployed at 90 days, including those reporting high levels of education and spoken English.

 

Screenshot (313)

Very high unemployment rate at 90 days. Why is 90 days important? That is when their resettlement contractor is done with them and has moved on to the next batch of paying clients (aka refugees).  By 90 days the SIV is expected to be self-sufficient.  BTW, don’t you wonder who the 1,760 “interpreters” without “good spoken English” are?

 

GAO continues…

Stakeholders [must be referring to the resettlement contractors—ed] GAO interviewed reported several resettlement challenges, including capacity issues in handling large numbers of SIV holders, difficulties finding skilled employment, and SIV holders’ high expectations.

Officials from local resettlement agencies in Northern Virginia reported capacity challenges for their agencies and the community due to the large increase of SIV holders. In almost all of GAO’s focus groups with principal SIV holders, participants expressed frustration at the need to take low-skilled jobs because they expected that their education and prior work experience would lead to skilled work. [You can bet they aren’t going to the slaughterhouse jobs where contractors like to place those in their care.—-ed]

State and HHS have taken steps to address some resettlement challenges. For example, in 2017 State placed restrictions on where SIV holders could resettle and HHS announced a new grant to support career development programs for SIV holders, refugees, and others.

In addition, State provides information to prospective SIV holders about resettlement. However, the information is general, and lacks detail on key issues such as housing affordability, employment, and available government assistance. Providing such specifics could lead to more informed decisions by SIV holders on where to resettle and help them more quickly adapt to potential challenges once in the United States.  [I don’t think that GAO knows that the SIVs original resettlement location is not chosen by the refugees, but by the State Department in conjunction with contractors*** as they bid for bodies (aka paying clients).—ed]

In light of so many disillusioned and unemployed SIVs, I sure hope that someone is reporting that news to others in the pipeline on their way to America!

Why the discrepancy in the numbers?

I wondered if GAO is downplaying the numbers on purpose…. were they as shocked as we are to find these enormous numbers?

In the summary, GAO talks about 13,000 SIVs since 2011, excluding family members, but in the full report they describe the real numbers we have placed in your towns and cities.

And, rather than saying “over 60,000”, they could have said closer to 70,000!  As I reported early this month, using data readily available at the State Department’s Refugee Processing Center (Wrapsnet), we admitted from FY2008-right up to my post on March 8th, the numbers as follows:

Iraq: 18,084

Afghanistan:  49,358

Total to March 8th: 67,442

When I went to the full report they say this (below) on Page 1, but once again use the word “about.”  They do clarify one point:  “about 20,000” are the people who worked for us or on behalf of us, the remaining, over 40,000! are their family members.

Afghan and Iraqi nationals who were employed by or on behalf of the U.S. government in Afghanistan or Iraq and have experienced ongoing serious threats as a consequence of such employment, or who worked directly with the U.S. Armed Forces or under chief of mission authority as a translator or interpreter, may apply for a special immigrant visa (SIV) to the United States.

Upon securing a visa, the principal SIV holder and his or her eligible dependents may resettle in the United States and are granted lawful permanent resident status upon admission into the United States. Since fiscal year 2008, over 60,000 individuals—about 20,000 principal SIV holders and their families—have been admitted under SIVs and received federal resettlement assistance upon arrival.

SIV holders are authorized to receive resettlement assistance from the Departments of State (State) and Health and Human Services (HHS), as well as federal public benefits, to the same extent and for the same periods of time as refugees.

 

***These are the nine federal contractors working with the US State Department to place the SIVs and their families. Although GAO seems to have been fixated on how poorly the State Department and ORR are keeping track of the SIVs and their progress toward assimilation, it seems to me that the contractors should come in for more blame if their charges are doing so poorly.

The number in parenthesis is the percentage of the nine VOLAGs’ income paid by you (the taxpayer) to place the refugees, line them up with jobs, and get them signed up for their services!  From most recent accounting, here.

 

Posted in Changing the way we live, Legal immigration and jobs, Other refugees, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Taxpayer goodies, Where to find information | Tagged: , , , , | 5 Comments »

Wholesale movement of Bhutanese refugees to US to end (so they say!)

Posted by Ann Corcoran on November 19, 2017

But, the UN still has 8,500 more to go to completely clean out their camps in Nepal.

The other day I mentioned that the US under Obama committed to helping the UN clean out some of its African camps of the people from the DR Congo and I predicted the resettlement would go way beyond the 50,000 (over 5 years).

After all, the US State Department has a track record….

Sauerbrey with UN ceil

Bush Asst. Sec. of State for PRM, stunned the UN in the fall of 2006 with news that the US would lead in cleaning out the camps.

New readers may not know that in 2006, the Bush Administration said, oh sure, we will take 60,000 over 5 years of the displaced ‘Bhutanese’ (really people of Nepali origin) living in UN camps in Nepal.

Never mind that we had no strategic interest and no responsibility for the Bhutan/Nepal quarrel.

The mostly Hindu ‘Bhutanese’ ended up in camps in Nepal when the country of Bhutan said they wanted only their people in their country (formerly known as Shangri-La).  Nepal refused to take in its people flooding out of Bhutan causing the UN to build camps.

So, I presume looking for more docile third world workers, George W. Bush said sure!

We were only supposed to take 60,000 over five years. But guess what?

We are now up to 94,473 (2,000 more are being processed) in nearly ten years!

I’m telling you, once the spigot opens, closing it becomes almost impossible!  Just look at the Somalis who we have been admitting for 30 years!

From Kathmandu Post:

Nov 19, 2017-As the decade-long third country resettlement programme of the Bhutanese refugees living in eastern Nepal draws to a close, the fate of the those still in the camps hangs in the balance.

The Ministry of Home Affairs (MoHA) and the UN refugee agency in Kathmandu confirmed that the third country resettlement scheme is closing down after the last batch of refugees leaves by the end of December.

Currently there are around 8,500 refugees in the camps in Jhapa district but both sides—Nepal government and the UNHCR—have yet to find alternatives for them.

There was pressure on Nepal government to locally assimilate the refugees in Nepal, but Kathmandu has been constantly saying that these refugees should be repatriated to Bhutan.

[….]

Screenshot (1103)_LI

LOL! So much for sharing in the responsibility with 7 other countries!   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhutanese_refugees

Nearly nine out of 10 Bhutanese refugees (90 percent) have been resettled since the launch of the third country resettlement programme in 2007, with nearly 111,000 refugees resettled in eight different countries. “Globally, far less than 1 percent of refugees are resettled. Thus, the resettlement programme for Bhutanese refugees in Nepal is truly exceptional,” the office said. The UNHCR, together with the international community, is working closely with the government of Nepal to find solutions for the remaining refugees, the UNHCR added. According to the UN office, with nearly 111,000 refugees resettled in third countries and only 8,500 of them remaining in Nepal, the opportunities to achieve durable solutions at this juncture are great.

[In 2006 we were told there were 100,000 that needed to be spread around the world, but see now they are up to nearly 120,000. Where did the extra 20,000 come from? Wandering in from the neighborhood?—ed]

[….]

Quick facts

Approximately 120,000 Bhutanese fled from their country and arrived in Nepal to become refugees from Bhutan in the early 1990s

They were lodged in several camps in Jhapa in eastern Nepal

The third country resettlement programme was launched in 2007

In the last one decade, nearly 111,000 refugees from Bhutan have been settled in various western countries, with the US alone receiving more than 90,000 of them

Nearly 2,000 refugees are currently undergoing screening process under the third country resettlement programme

The UN refugee agency says it is set to close down the third-country resettlement programme by early next

The last batch is likely to leave in December after which an estimated 8,500 Bhutanese refugees will remain in Nepal

More here.

For my extensive file on the Bhutanese resettlement to America, click here. You will see in early posts how hard the people fought to NOT be distributed around the world.

And, if you want to know how many your state ‘welcomed’ here is a map today at Wrapsnet.

Screenshot (1100)

Screenshot (1101)_LI

Top ‘welcoming’ states are Pennsylvania, Ohio and Texas (making sure those states turn reliably blue, so dark blue you can’t read the numbers on the map!)

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Other refugees, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information, Who is going where | Tagged: , , , , , , | 9 Comments »

45,732 refugees admitted this fiscal year so far, 45% are Muslim

Posted by Ann Corcoran on May 29, 2017

I’ve been asked frequently what the numbers look like for which religions are practiced by refugees entering the US right now.

Unless Donald Trump tells us that the New York Times story was fake news last week, see here, and that we are not shooting for 70,000 refugees this year, we will assume it is true (and report the numbers as they come in).  Just a reminder that any number in excess of 70,000 will put Trump ahead of most Bush years and ahead of several of Obama’s years.

It doesn’t matter what religion the alleged Burmese biter practices, the questions you should ask are, how did he get through “extreme vetting” and can we afford ‘refugees’ with this degree of apparent mental illness? https://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/2017/05/28/burmese-biter-was-headed-for-new-bern-nc-are-we-importing-mentally-ill-in-refugee-program/

Before I give you the list, I want to emphasize that religion should not be the main criteria for your assessment of whether the refugee is good or bad for America.

First, these people are all supposed to have been PERSECUTED?   Do we take some who are really simply economic migrants, those who need work? If so, that is not the purpose of the Refugee Act of 1980.

Can we afford large numbers with mental illness, or illnesses such as TB?

Can we afford those who have no hope of getting off welfare for a generation?

Can we afford those who might already have criminal tendencies that do not become evident in those personal interviews (when no data is available from failed nation states)?

Are we to take into consideration the need by big companies and the Chamber of Commerce for a steady supply of cheap immigrant labor (supported by your tax dollars)?

Are we taking some supposed ‘refugees’ for other purposes of the US State Department, to ‘help-out’ some country that is having a security or economic problem? Or, as we have done in some cases (Uzbeks? Meskhetians?), where we want something from that country?

Again, religion should not be the primary reason we admit or deny anyone, unless they can prove they are being persecuted for it!

Here is a list of some of the religions recorded at Wrapsnet and the refugees who practice those religions (data for this fiscal year from October 1, 2016 to today).  Note: This program operates on a fiscal year basis!

Again, I do not include below all of the religions listed. These are the larger (or more interesting to me) numbers and these are not my categories, they are how they are categorized at Wrapsnet.  45% of those entering the US in this fiscal year practice some form of Islam.   Since Trump was inaugurated on January 20th, the percentage of Muslims entering the US has dropped to 39%.

Numbers for the fiscal year 2017 (so far):

Baptists (1,591)

Buddhists (1,380)

Catholics (2,713)

Christians (6,890)

Evangelical Christians (364)

Hindu (979)

Jehovah Witness (388)

Jewish (149)

Moslem Suni (9,663)

Moslem Shiite (2,509)

Moslem (8,180) These must not have designated a sect

No religion (369)

Orthodox (983)

Pentecostalist (3,901)

Protestant (1,918)

Yezidi (416)

Total refugees this fiscal year:  45,732

Like it or not, these will be Trump’s refugees because years from now (especially if we reach the 70,000 mark by September 30th), no one will remember that Obama presided over 3 1/2 months of the fiscal year.

Again, the data base goes on for 22 pages and I’ve picked those with the largest numbers, or in a few cases ones that interested me like the small number of Jews entering as refugees.  If HIAS (formerly Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society) still focused on Jewish refugees they would be out of business by now!

One last thing!

We have been admitting mostly Burmese Christians for probably a decade, but the number of Burmese Muslims (Rohingya) are on the rise and I note that, for this fiscal year, 1,108 of the ‘Moslems’ are from Burma.  I was also surprised to see how large a number of ‘Moslems’ there were from the DR Congo (325) when that whole flow was supposed to have been, we were led to believe, Christians.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Christian refugees, Muslim refugees, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Trump | Tagged: | 4 Comments »

Mr. Cool goes to Milan, is paid millions to announce that “climate refugees” will flood the first world

Posted by Ann Corcoran on May 11, 2017

Changing the subject?

Just in case Islam-generated conflicts run out of steam in the Middle East and Africa, Barack Obama crossed the Atlantic to collect a speaking fee reportedly in the $3 million range to pronounce that, as a result of global warming there would be a refugee crisis “unprecedented in human history.”

Unbuttoned to mid-chest: We are told that Mr. Cool forgot his tie. If you are a former President of the US staying in what must be the most expensive hotel in the city, isn’t it possible to send out for a wonderful selection of beautiful ties? http://www.nationalreview.com/article/447465/obama-climate-speech-milan-offered-nothing-new

He wants to make sure that world Open Borders activists (and global corporations looking for cheap labor) wouldn’t run out of reasons to tear down borders to the first world (if Islamic conflicts fail to do a good enough job).

Obama talked extensively in the speech about the impact of warming, while several reports lately say the earth is entering a cooling period.  So which is it?

Below is some of what Obama said in what some, here are calling a “contradictory speech.”

From the UK Independent:

Climate change could produce a refugee crisis that is “unprecedented in human history”, Barack Obama has warned as he stressed global warming was the most pressing issue of the age.

Speaking at an international food conference in Milan, the former US President said rising temperatures were already making it more difficult to grow crops and rising food prices were “leading to political instability”.

“Floods on sunny days”—bad, very bad….

He said the United States was currently experiencing “floods on sunny days”, increased wildfires and, in Alaska, increased coastal erosion as the ice melts and no country was “immune” to the problem.

Climate refugees on the march….

If world leaders put aside “parochial interests” and took action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by enough to restrict the rise to one or two degrees Celsius, then humanity would probably be able to cope. [So, might we shut up about this issue if sunspot activity and natural cycles restrict the rise to one or two degrees?—ed]

Failing to do this, Mr Obama warned, increased the risk of “catastrophic” effects in the future, “not only real threats to food security, but also increases in conflict as a consequence of scarcity and greater refugee and migration patterns”.

“If those rain patterns change, then you could see hundreds of millions of people who suddenly find themselves unable to feed themselves, because they’re already at subsistence levels.

“And the amount of migration, the number of refugees that could be resulting from something like that, would be unprecedented in human history.”

Dare I mention the scientific notion of carrying capacity and that a population die-off might be mother earth’s way of staying in balance (okay stone me!).

Continue reading here.

I have a ‘Climate Refugees’ category with 49 previous posts on the topic, here.  I don’t know if they have settled their differences, but early-on the climate refugee agitators were at odds with the ‘humanitarian’ refugee agitators over the use of the word “refugee.”  ‘Humanitarians’ were angered by environmentalists stealing the word that they had over decades built up as one that invokes warm and fuzzy feelings among people who know nothing.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Climate refugees, Obama, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Who is going where | Tagged: , | 21 Comments »

Nearly 100,000 Bhutanese refugees later we help UN clean out camps in Nepal

Posted by Ann Corcoran on December 28, 2016

Lesson! When the Department of State welcomes an ethnic group to America expect the resettlement to be larger and longer than they initially said it would be.

We have followed the process of cleaning out UNHCR camps in Nepal of Bhutanese refugees ever since the Bush Administration said: ‘come on in’ we well take 60,000.  This resettlement was planned to last for five years (as we now approach ten!). I suspect it was UNHCR Antonio Guterres (now Secretary General of the UN) who talked the Bush State Department in to this!

***Update*** More news here: UN says the movement of over 100,000 third worlders to first world countries was a great success.

The so-called “Bhutanese” are people of Nepali ethnicity that were pushed out of Bhutan when the Bhutanese government basically said, we want Bhutan for Bhutanese and you Nepali people who have moved in here for decades need to leave.  To learn more about what happened, check out wikipedia, here.

bhutan-map

When we began posting on this group of mostly Hindu people back in 2007, most did not want to be resettled anywhere but back in Bhutan. And, obviously Nepal wasn’t welcoming their kinsmen home.

So, how did this become our problem?

Why did the US decide to resettle tens of thousands and scatter them around America? Frankly, with our economic muscle certainly we could have prevailed on either Bhutan or Nepal to work this out! Or, did we simply acquiesce to pressure from the United Nations? And, was the refugee industry looking for more paying clients and big business looking for cheap labor?

So here we are almost ten years in.  We said we would resettle 60,000 and so I checked Wrapsnet.org (2007 to December 15, 2016) to see exactly how many we have taken since 2007.  The answer is 91,713!  But according to this article in the Katmandu Post we will be closing the program in 2017 (I guess to make more room for the Muslim Syrians, Iraqis and Somalis).

For ambitious readers, visit our archive on the Bhutanese by clicking here.  Some have done well in America, but for years they had an extremely high suicide rate that worried the resettlement industry. One of many morals to this story is that when the US State Department gives you a number that will be resettled, expect the resettlement to be much larger and much longer than they said it would be!

Many forced to choose resettlement against their will!

Here is the story from before Christmas from the Katmandu Post (notice that many are still holding out hope that they will go home to Bhutan):

Dec 15, 2016- More than 100,000 Bhutanese refugees have been resettled in various countries under the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugee (UNHCR) third country resettlement programme. But some the remaining refugees in eastern Tarai are still putting their feet down for repatriation.

Around 2,000 of the remaining 11,000 refugees, put up at various camps in Jhapa and Morang, are refusing the third country resettlement and willing to return their own homeland in Bhutan, according to a source at the UNHCR. The repatriation campaign has come closer to end after the UN body’s resettlement programme. The repatriation campaign has been weakened as the leaders spearheading repatriation themselves opted for third country resettlement. And the majority of the remaining refugees are also in resettlement process, giving up hope of repatriation.

Bhampa Rai, Balaram Poudel, among other refugee leaders, are still campaigning for repatriation, though. They blamed the government of Nepal for its failure to take any initiatives for their cause. “Nepal could neither convince Bhutan to take back refugees nor pressure the international community over the issue,” said Rai, claiming that hundreds of refugees had been forced to choose third country resettlement against their will.

[….]

According to the UNHCR, 107,000 refugees are already resettled in various host countries, including the US, Australia and Canada. Another batch of around 9,000 refugees are in the process of resettlement, officials at the UNHCR said.

The UNHCR’s third country resettlement programme will come to an end in 2017.

So where are they in America? (Or, at least where were they originally resettled). Map is from Wrapsnet.org.

screenshot-104

States cut off in my screenshot are Hawaii (0), Alaska (148) and Florida (671)

Here are the top ten states where the Bhutanese were resettled:

screenshot-103

Inds stands for Individuals.

One of the things I’ve always wondered about is this:  The UN was so anxious to close these camps (to deny these people a ‘right of return’) while they never had any interest in resettling the Palestinians around the Arab world, but has kept the Palestinian camps (really cities) open for over 60 years.  I’m actually not wondering. I really do know the answer! It was (and is) to keep a thorn in Israel’s side.

Posted in Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Resettlement cities, Taxpayer goodies, Where to find information, Who is going where | Tagged: , | 9 Comments »

Concord, NH: Bhutanese refugees’ religious ceremony draws neighbors’ ire

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 17, 2015

I’m running out of time this morning after writing so much about Allentown, PA, but want to get a few more things posted before I have to move on to other of life’s duties.

Over a week ago a large gathering of Bhutanese refugees disturbed a quiet Concord neighborhood with chanting, large numbers of people and traffic.  The original story is here at the Concord Monitor.  One resident put a “GO HOME” sign in a window.

That story was followed by an apology of sorts from one of the Bhutanese refugees involved.  But interestingly he blamed the federal refugee contractor for not giving the former UN camp residents, the Hindu Bhutanese, a sufficient cultural orientation.

For new readers, we have now resettled over 80,000 Bhutanese refugees from camps in Nepal (they are really Nepali people that Nepal didn’t want back once they were expelled from Bhutan).   The UN wanted to clean out the camps (the plan was very controversial because many did not want to be “scattered to the four winds” as they said at the time).

bhutansa

People ask me all the time—who are these Bhutanese? Here is a map of Bhutan and Nepal. The so-called Bhutanese refugees were living for 20 years or so in UN camps in Nepal. The UN wanted to clean out the camps so we said o.k. and now more than 80,000 are scattered throughout America. They are not Muslims. http://www.oocities.org/bhutaneserefugees/refugeecampmap.html

The Bush Administration decision to resettle 60,000 in the US was made by former Maryland candidate for Governor Ellen Sauerbrey who was the Bush Asst. Sec. of State for PRM.  As I said, we are now up to 80,000 and they are still coming.

Don’t forget readers that the Refugee Admissions Program is 35 years old and Republicans like George W. Bush enthusiastically helped this migration of third worlders to America.

We have a very lengthy archive on the Bhutanese resettlement going back to 2007, learn more by clicking here.   Pay attention to stories about the high suicide rate of the Bhutanese people in America.

So back to the Concord news.  This is PRAJA SHAPKOTA writing a sort-of apology for the disruption in the neighborhood, here (see photo!).

I feel concerned with the discontentment generated due to the religious ceremony in the Heights neighborhood of Concord (Monitor front page, Oct. 7).

As a member of the community in Upstate New York, I wish to express my personal viewpoints with some background information.

We the Bhutanese people of Nepali ethnicity have come to the United States after persecution and eviction by the absolute monarchy of Bhutan from 1985 to 1995. We have spent more than 18 years in crowded refugee camps of Nepal in uncertainty when Nepal was undergoing political metamorphism.

The refugee camps strengthened family and neighborly bonds with higher interpersonal interactions, which has become a community culture. What we see and do shapes our ways of life – our very culture.

We primarily follow the Hindu traditions, and for a family a lengthy religious function is once or twice in a generation. In case of Rudra Timsina, the function was a way of sharing joy with the community after buying a house – the achievement of a dream. Most invitees attend the discourses and cultural activities at least once in seven days as this is also a method to socialize among people with cultural and language barriers.

Such people constitute more than 50 percent in our community – illiterate in English and unaware of the American culture and traditions. We have never lived with people of totally different culture. Hence, this is a case of “conflict of culture and outlook” and not a conflict of community.

[….]

….in my opinion, the resettlement agencies with local community organizations should initiate at least a month of group orientation on the various aspects of American culture, such that a “conflict of culture” can be lessened.

I’ve had complaints from some of our readers about the large number of Bhutanese refugees in their communities.  At least this writer is sensitive to the disruption created in this Concord situation.

Who is bringing the Bhutanese to Concord?

Go here to the handy list, and see that three federal refugee contractors are dividing up the pie in the same office in Concord (Church World Service, Episcopal Migration Ministries and Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service).  Manchester, NH has been overloaded so now it looks like they are busy little beavers colonizing Concord.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities | Tagged: , , | 8 Comments »

Sec. of State John Kerry: Climate refugees our next move to erase borders

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 10, 2015

Thanks to reader Joanne for sending us this bit of news from one-worlder John Kerry. Kerry must be so thrilled to combine two of the the Left’s favorite pet propaganda campaigns—global warming and refugees.

It is not “new” as Kerry claims, we have an entire category devoted to so-called ‘climate refugees,’ go here (46 previous posts) for more of this nonsense.

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Climate refugees coming to a town near you? I love this illustration! It comes from Diplo (http://www.diplomacy.edu/blog/climate-refugees-new-concept-move)

From Breitbart:

Secretary of State John Kerry warns the world that more and more people will be fleeing the devastation caused by global warming. “It’s something new. We have climate refugees today,” he said during a town hall event about the oceans.

Kerry described climate refugees as people who had to leave their homes because of drought, rising sea levels, and thawing permafrost.

[….]

International organizations, like the United Nations, he admitted, would have to codify the term “climate refugee” and put it into law. That would grant special immigration privileges to immigrants claiming refugee status, allowing them to move to other countries.

“I think it’s just a matter of time before it fits in under a category and countries have — and the refugee process has legitimately incorporated it into our policy,” Kerry said.

For anyone interested, there has been a huge controversy between the environmentalist ‘climate refugee’ pushers and the ‘humanitarian refugee’ establishment over definitions.  If you go to earlier posts in my ‘climate refugee category’ you will see what I mean.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Climate refugees, Colonization, Community destabilization, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Taxpayer goodies, The Opposition | Tagged: , | 6 Comments »

Cuban “refugee” numbers ticked up dramatically when Obama announced normalization of relations with Cuba

Posted by Ann Corcoran on August 17, 2015

Once Obama announced that we were going to be on good terms with Communist Cuba, I wondered what it would mean for the tens of thousands of so-called Cuban refugees we have been taking in over recent years.

I would think the whole Cuban resettlement would come to a grinding halt since love was in the air between our country and theirs.

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Sec. of State John Kerry in Cuba last week. We are now pals with the Cuban government. So this should mean that no more ‘refugees’ need to come to the US from Cuba! Right!

Apparently Cubans wanting out saw the writing-on-the-wall and expedited their travel to America.

Here, according to Breitbart (hat tip: Joanne):

The United States is experiencing a massive surge in the number of Cuban refugees risking their lives to reach American shores, following President Obama’s announcement that the White House would legitimize the communist Castro regime by reestablishing diplomatic relations.

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol is reporting that 23,978 Cuban refugees arrived in the United States between October 2014 and May 2015, with another 3,564 Cubans attempting and failing to reach U.S. shores. Most of those arriving successfully crossed the southern border with Mexico or crossed the straits of the Caribbean separating Florida from Cuba. The number of Cubans arriving in the past eight months is significantly larger than the number that reached the United States throughout all of the 2014 fiscal year: 22,162.

In January, officials reported experiencing a major spike in Cuban refugee migration between December 2014 and January 2015, in the immediate aftermath of President Obama’s announcement of normalization of relations with the Cuban regime. Coastal officials recorded a 60% increase in the number of Cubans traveling to the United States in the last trimester of 2014, but a 117% increase in migration when comparing December 2013 and December 2014.

Read it all.

I know from past research that the US Conference of Catholic Bishops is paid (by you) to help the Cubans resettle, but I think others of the nine contractors get a cut of the federal dole to help bring Cubans to your towns.

Posted in Colonization, Community destabilization, Obama, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Taxpayer goodies, Who is going where | Tagged: , , | 4 Comments »

Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society can’t find enough housing in San Fran for gay ‘refugees’ (from South Africa)

Posted by Ann Corcoran on July 30, 2015

Ho hum!  So we are bringing refugees from the highly touted welcoming-to-all “Rainbow Nation” of South Africa, dropping them off in San Francisco and now whining about how there isn’t enough housing for them.  Maybe one of the well-paid staffers at the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS) might welcome this gay refugee to their home!

A long sob story at the Bay Area Reporter:

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Isn’t HIAS PAID to take care of the refugees it resettles? Why is San Francisco gay refugee saying this: “In the U.S. I am facing homelessness,” Mayema told the Bay Area Reporter in a recent interview. “I don’t want to end up on the streets.”

“Our biggest challenge in helping these people is to find housing for them,” said Amy Weiss, the director of refugee and immigrant services at Jewish Family and Children’s Services of the East Bay. “They come with no employment history and no housing history. San Francisco is hard enough to find housing if you have an income. It is a huge problem for us and for them and to anybody resettling refugees.”

The agency is believed to be the only one in the country that has developed a specific program to work with LGBT refugees. It began four years ago when a number of Iranian LGBT refugees, who had fled to Turkey, needed help resettling in the U.S.

Since then the agency has worked with a number of LGBT refugees, mostly gay men from Africa and the Middle East. In November Junior Mayema arrived from Capetown, South Africa, where he had fled five years ago from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Then look at this, even the UN High Commissioner for Refugees refers to the attack (the star of this story claimed he suffered) as an “alleged attack.” So, he was resettled in America even though it was never proven he was attacked in S. Africa?

UNHCR staff, after learning about Mayema’s alleged attack, referred his case for resettlement last summer. Four months later, according to the account, he was granted refugee status and, in November, arrived in the Bay Area where he received assistance from the Jewish agency and a local church-sponsored group in acclimating to his new surroundings.

And, by the way, as we admit hundreds of refugees from the supposedly welcoming country of South Africa, you can bet there are few if any persecuted white people in the group.  I wonder if a white person pretended to be gay or lesbian and said he or she was attacked, could they get in to the US from South Africa?

The sob story goes on and on, continue reading here.  It is largely a play for more taxpayer money!

Posted in Africa, Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Other refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Taxpayer goodies, Who is going where | Tagged: , , | 4 Comments »

 
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