Refugee Resettlement Watch

Archive for the ‘Refugee statistics’ Category

Wholesale movement of Bhutanese refugees to US to end (so they say!)

Posted by Ann Corcoran on November 19, 2017

But, the UN still has 8,500 more to go to completely clean out their camps in Nepal.

The other day I mentioned that the US under Obama committed to helping the UN clean out some of its African camps of the people from the DR Congo and I predicted the resettlement would go way beyond the 50,000 (over 5 years).

After all, the US State Department has a track record….

Sauerbrey with UN ceil

Bush Asst. Sec. of State for PRM, stunned the UN in the fall of 2006 with news that the US would lead in cleaning out the camps.

New readers may not know that in 2006, the Bush Administration said, oh sure, we will take 60,000 over 5 years of the displaced ‘Bhutanese’ (really people of Nepali origin) living in UN camps in Nepal.

Never mind that we had no strategic interest and no responsibility for the Bhutan/Nepal quarrel.

The mostly Hindu ‘Bhutanese’ ended up in camps in Nepal when the country of Bhutan said they wanted only their people in their country (formerly known as Shangri-La).  Nepal refused to take in its people flooding out of Bhutan causing the UN to build camps.

So, I presume looking for more docile third world workers, George W. Bush said sure!

We were only supposed to take 60,000 over five years. But guess what?

We are now up to 94,473 (2,000 more are being processed) in nearly ten years!

I’m telling you, once the spigot opens, closing it becomes almost impossible!  Just look at the Somalis who we have been admitting for 30 years!

From Kathmandu Post:

Nov 19, 2017-As the decade-long third country resettlement programme of the Bhutanese refugees living in eastern Nepal draws to a close, the fate of the those still in the camps hangs in the balance.

The Ministry of Home Affairs (MoHA) and the UN refugee agency in Kathmandu confirmed that the third country resettlement scheme is closing down after the last batch of refugees leaves by the end of December.

Currently there are around 8,500 refugees in the camps in Jhapa district but both sides—Nepal government and the UNHCR—have yet to find alternatives for them.

There was pressure on Nepal government to locally assimilate the refugees in Nepal, but Kathmandu has been constantly saying that these refugees should be repatriated to Bhutan.

[….]

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LOL! So much for sharing in the responsibility with 7 other countries!   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhutanese_refugees

Nearly nine out of 10 Bhutanese refugees (90 percent) have been resettled since the launch of the third country resettlement programme in 2007, with nearly 111,000 refugees resettled in eight different countries. “Globally, far less than 1 percent of refugees are resettled. Thus, the resettlement programme for Bhutanese refugees in Nepal is truly exceptional,” the office said. The UNHCR, together with the international community, is working closely with the government of Nepal to find solutions for the remaining refugees, the UNHCR added. According to the UN office, with nearly 111,000 refugees resettled in third countries and only 8,500 of them remaining in Nepal, the opportunities to achieve durable solutions at this juncture are great.

[In 2006 we were told there were 100,000 that needed to be spread around the world, but see now they are up to nearly 120,000. Where did the extra 20,000 come from? Wandering in from the neighborhood?—ed]

[….]

Quick facts

Approximately 120,000 Bhutanese fled from their country and arrived in Nepal to become refugees from Bhutan in the early 1990s

They were lodged in several camps in Jhapa in eastern Nepal

The third country resettlement programme was launched in 2007

In the last one decade, nearly 111,000 refugees from Bhutan have been settled in various western countries, with the US alone receiving more than 90,000 of them

Nearly 2,000 refugees are currently undergoing screening process under the third country resettlement programme

The UN refugee agency says it is set to close down the third-country resettlement programme by early next

The last batch is likely to leave in December after which an estimated 8,500 Bhutanese refugees will remain in Nepal

More here.

For my extensive file on the Bhutanese resettlement to America, click here. You will see in early posts how hard the people fought to NOT be distributed around the world.

And, if you want to know how many your state ‘welcomed’ here is a map today at Wrapsnet.

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Top ‘welcoming’ states are Pennsylvania, Ohio and Texas (making sure those states turn reliably blue, so dark blue you can’t read the numbers on the map!)

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Other refugees, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information, Who is going where | Tagged: , , , , , , | 9 Comments »

US top refugee processing countries shifting with Trump Administration

Posted by Ann Corcoran on November 11, 2017

I know this is getting in to the weeds, but I want readers to understand that for instance, the Somali refugees arriving in the US are picked up all over the world, and so if there is a ‘travel ban’ for say Somalia it doesn’t mean that no Somalis are coming.

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Most Somalis coming to the US come from Kenya because the big UN camps are there and the UN makes the first cut on who comes to America.

From time to time, I show you processing country maps which are posted at Wrapsnet (the State Department’s Refugee Processing Center) for the previous months of the fiscal year (by the 5th of the present month).

For background, visit this post from December 2016 where you can see the top PROCESSING country is Kenya followed by Turkey and Tanzania as numbers two and three.

I’m always annoyed to see Malta as a processing country because as a European country it is responsible for the illegal boat migrants who land on its shores (not America!), but ever since the Bush Administration we have been turning illegal aliens on Malta into refugees destined for Your Town, USA.  See my huge archive on the disgraceful Malta deal, here.

And, tell me, how can they seriously assure us that some boat migrant from Libya who washed ashore on the island nation of Malta has been thoroughly security screened!  Was he carrying his documents and criminal record in a ziploc bag?

Here is Wrapsnet’s processing countries map for the first month of President Trump’s first full fiscal year—October FY18.  FY17 began when Obama was still in office.

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In the first month of fiscal year 2018 the US admitted 1,247 refugees

 

 

Here below is a list of the countries from which we are processing refugees so far this fiscal year.

Malta to America Express!

See that Trump’s State Department has continued the Malta to America express!  By the way there is no way I’ve ever figured out how to identify what nationalities are arriving from Malta.  In the past we did learn that many are Somalis. The numbers are small but significant because we again are taking illegal migrants that are really Europe’s problem!

The Trump Administration could stop the Malta arrangement with a phone call if they wanted to.

And, I sure would like to know why we take any refugees from Israel! They should be taking care of whichever ‘refugees’ seek asylum there.  What is that all about.

 

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Kenya is still in the top three but dropped from first to third place. First place goes to Nepal (for the so-called Bhutanese refugees) with Malaysia as number two. Note that Ethiopia is not far behind the top 3. Malaysia is the likely jumping off location for Rohingya to America. Turkey and Tanzania are now way down the list.

 

 

Since one of the top three sending countries is Kenya I checked Wrapsnet for the number of Somalis who entered the US in the month of October.  The total number was 113.

Then, for fun! I wanted to see how many and where they went in Minnesota. The total was 23 in October.  Minnesota got the highest number in the 113. The other 90 were scattered around America. None to St. Cloud right now.

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Here are some of the top ethnic groups resettled in the US in October: Bhutanese (273), DR Congolese (181), Burmese (147), Somalis (113), Ukrainians (77) and Syrians (33).

Because knowledge is power, here is what you can do…

With long cold winter days ahead, you too might want to have fun with numbers at Wrapsnet, the US State Department’s data collection site.  You never know what you might find out about your own state or even your own town!

Endnote: While we are looking at maps, you might want to revisit a map showing the countries that have been warned about the deadly Plague spreading out from Madagascar.

Posted in Muslim refugees, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Resettlement cities, Trump, What you can do, Where to find information, Who is going where | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

October refugee numbers extremely low, refugee industry worried

Posted by Ann Corcoran on November 4, 2017

Michael Patrick Leahy at Breitbart did some number crunching yesterday and the conclusion is that if the Trump Administration continues to admit refugees at this historically low level, our refugee admissions this year will be way below the CEILING Trump set in September for this fiscal year (45,000).

But….

Will President Donald Trump beat George W. Bush’s record?

Here is Leahy:

The number of refugees admitted into the country during the first month of FY 2018 by the Trump administration plummeted to 1,242 – an 87 percent decline from the 9,945 admitted during the first month of FY 2017 by the Obama administration.

The percentage of refugees admitted who are Muslim declined dramatically as well, from 45 percent in October 2016 to 23 percent in October 2017, according to the State Department interactive website.

Bush grin

George W. Bush still holds the record for the two lowest admission years in 2002 and 2003.  Why so low? Fear of terrorists getting in to the US in the wake of 9/11.

Of particular note is the precipitous drop in the number of refugees admitted from the seven countries whose citizens were temporarily banned from traveling to the United States under the first travel ban, Executive Order 13679, issued by President Trump on January 27, 2017.

In October 2017, the first month of FY 2018, only 275 refugees from these seven countries — Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudian, Syria, and Yemen — were admitted to the United States under the Refugee Admissions Program.

In contrast, in October 2016, the first month of FY 2017, a total of 4,581 refugees from these seven countries were admitted into the United States under the Refugee Admissions Program (1,352 from Somalia, 1,323 from Iraq, 1,297 from Syria, 414 from Iran, and none from either Libya or Yemen.)

This would beat the Bush record!

Should refugee admissions continue at this same pace for the remaining eleven months of FY 2018, the total number of refugees admitted for the entire fiscal year would be less than 15,000, which is 30,000 below the 45,000 cap for refugees set forward in the Trump administration’s presidential determination announced in September.

If it should be 15,000 that would be the lowest number admitted since the creation of the present system of admitting refugees.  However, anything above George W. Bush’s two lowest years of 27,070 (2002) and 28,117 (2003) would not set any records. In both those years the CEILING was set at 70,000 (so much for ceilings having any meaning!).

Leahy continues:

The refugee resettlement industry — which receives almost all of its estimated $1 billion annual funding from the federal government — is already feeling the budget pinch resulting from the diminished number of new arrivals. [And, that is why you are seeing so many refugee ‘forums’ in various states seeking to gin-up negative media publicity against Trump—ed]

[….]

The harsh political reality now facing the refugee resettlement industry is that neither the Trump administration nor Congress have much inclination to meet that 45,000 annual refugee ceiling.

Continue reading here.

Want to see where the refugees went in the first month of FY18.  Here is a map from Wrapsnet (October 1-31, 2017).  Top ‘welcoming’ states were Texas, Ohio, California, New York and Washington.

 

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Sorry to split the map.  I couldn’t figure out how to get it on one page for the screenshot!  Alaska welcomed 9 and Hawaii (the state begging for more diversity) again got zero!

 

For more on numbers, see my ‘refugee statistics’ category here.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Trump Watch! | Tagged: , , | 14 Comments »

Pew produces handy summary of where refugees have been placed since FY02

Posted by Ann Corcoran on November 3, 2017

The Pew Research Center, which has the money and time, has put together a handy interactive map to show which ethnic groups were placed in which states since fiscal year 2002.

This is the 2017 map (FY17 ended on September 30th, 2017). Of course it can be deceptive because it doesn’t show the numbers.

Take Hawaii for instance that shows Burmese predominated in the refugee flow to that state, but it doesn’t tell you that the flow was probably a whole 3 Burmese refugees (maybe 5 or 6, I was too lazy to look up the number).

 

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The nationalities change over the years as the US jumps to the United Nations’ tune and follows its dictates as to what groups to further diversify America with (that are in vogue at the moment). DR Congo is a hit-cause right now, but watch for movement to the Burmese Rohingya.  Iraqis had their hay-day.  Bhutan chic is fading, and Syrians are oh-so-yesterday. Somalis remain a reliably cool choice year after year.

 

In case you are wondering, Wyoming wisely stayed out of the whole mess over decades. However, a couple of years ago the Republican governor there proposed setting up a refugee office in the state with the help of the Lutheran contractor out of its Rocky Mountain office.  There was a robust citizens’ uprising that ended that idea for now.  (See my Wyoming archive.)

Author Jynnah Radford tells us this at the end (a refresher for new readers).

Generally, refugee populations are dispersed across the U.S. based on local community resources, efforts to reunite families and the ability of nonprofit organizations to resettle refugees. Nine voluntary agencies share the national resettlement workload and determine where refugees will settle. (These agencies maintain a nationwide network of 309 affiliated offices in 180 locations to provide services.)

In other words…

Local community resources” = welfare, good medical care including mental health care and available housing, etc.  And, LOL! global companies looking for cheap and compliant labor!

Efforts to reunite families” = once they have established a seed community of a particular ethnic group in your town or city, they will bring in the extended family and that is part of the trick on you! Population gets too large and you are labeled a hate monger and racist for denying ‘family’ reunification if you ask for a slowdown.

Ability of the nonprofit organizations to resettle refugees” = do the members of the big nine*** have a subcontractor group/other citizens’ group up and running.

“Nine share the workload” = those nine have a monopoly on the resettlement process, they bid for bodies (paying clients) among the incoming refugee cases.

(Nine) “determine where refugees will resettle” = you and your community have no say, they are deciding the future of your town in secretive weekly meetings in DC.

***These are the big nine quasi-government agencies, run by no one elected by you, that make the decisions about how to change your town by changing the people (with the help of the Podesta Group and the meatpackers!).

 

 

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information, Who is going where | Tagged: , | 7 Comments »

President Trump issues new Executive Order on refugees as old one expired yesterday

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 25, 2017

Trump and Sessions

The Attorney General will report to the President on his findings in 180 days.

Apparently Donald Trump isn’t finished reviewing the UN/US Refugee Admissions Program and yesterday set forth in a new Executive Order plans to continue to study the many concerns surrounding the USRAP for another 180 days.

That, however, hasn’t stopped the flow of refugees in to the country in the first 24 days of this fiscal year.  The number, as of this morning, is 1,236 entries since October 1. (See the graph below showing monthly admissions over the last ten years.

 

Here are a couple of critical sections of the new EO (read all of it here). Hat tip Richard at Blue Ridge Forum.

(ii) Within 90 days of the date of this order and annually thereafter, the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State and the Director of National Intelligence, shall determine, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law, whether any actions taken to address the risks to the security and welfare of the United States presented by permitting any category of refugees to enter this country should be modified or terminated, and, if so, what those modifications or terminations should be. If the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State, determines, at any time, that any actions taken pursuant to section 3(a)(i) should be modified or terminated, the Secretary of Homeland Security may modify or terminate those actions accordingly. The Secretary of Homeland Security and the Secretary of State shall administer the USRAP consistent with the determinations made under this subsection, and in consultation with the Attorney General and the Director of National Intelligence.

And, then this section is especially interesting.  The Justice Department is required to do a study of the effect of refugee resettlement including its effect on the “general welfare of the United States.”

(b) Within 180 days of the date of this order, the Attorney General shall, in consultation with the Secretary of State and the Secretary of Homeland Security, and in cooperation with the heads of other executive departments and agencies as he deems appropriate, provide a report to the President on the effect of refugee resettlement in the United States on the national security, public safety, and general welfare of the United States. The report shall include any recommendations the Attorney General deems necessary to advance those interests.

We will be watching for that in April!

But, all the more reason you all have to make news where you live so that we can maybe, just maybe, get the attention of the Attorney General! (See St. Cloud!)

Here from Wrapsnet is a month by month accounting of refugee admissions going back to FY2007.  Again, as of today, we have admitted 1,236 refugees in the first 24 days of October.

To reach anywhere near Trump’s FY18 ceiling of 45,000, we would have to admit refugees at a rate of over 3,500 a month.  Each refugee is, as you know, a paying client for one of the nine federal refugee contractors.***

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Take a few minutes to look at this chart. Notice the ceiling and then the actual admissions number. Obama set his last ceiling at 110,000.  I don’t know why it isn’t even reported here. But, be sure to see how he came in at only in the 50,000s for a few years when most media reports leave readers with the impression that somehow Trump has cut numbers in half! That 53,

 

This post is filed in my Refugee statistics and Where to find information categories.

*** For new readers, these are the nine federal refugee contractors placing refugees into towns and cities in most of your states.

Posted in Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Trump Watch!, Where to find information | 8 Comments »

Lutheran Social Service planning to seed 225 additional refugees into St. Cloud this year

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 12, 2017

jodi harpstead

CEO Harpstead pulls down a salary and benefits package of over $300,000 annually to head the $91 million a year operation. Link to Form 990 below.

If they succeed they will be placing 27 more than they did in FY17 which ended on the 30th of September.

Checking Wrapsnet, here is a summary (below) of the refugees (mostly Muslims) who were placed by a subcontractor (Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota) of the Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service mothership located in Baltimore.

Refugees who went to St. Cloud in direct resettlement (there are no reliable numbers on secondary migrants) last year are below.

 

Secondary migrants are refugees placed elsewhere who migrate (legally!) on their own to another town or city.

Minnesota does have the highest number of secondary migrants in the country as we learned a few years ago when such information was published.

In FY17 St. Cloud received 198 of the 1,623 refugees resettled in the entire state.

Burma (4)

Ethiopia (19)

Iraq (9)

Somalia (166)

St. Cloud had the second highest Somali resettlement after Minneapolis (364).

Here (below) is the FY18 R & P Abstract for St. Cloud. 

This is the document that should be made available to the public BEFORE it goes to Washington.  These numbers are determined by Lutheran Social Service in Minnesota (Harpstead’s organization) with the help of “stakeholders.”  Stakeholders should include your local elected officials!

(See my post on St. Cloud yesterday)

Normally this document is kept from the general public, but we were fortunate enough to obtain it. Knowledge is power and that is the primary reason there is so little transparency with refugee resettlement. The feds and the contractors don’t want citizens to have all the facts!

I maintain that if the program is a good one for the community, they should be able to sell it with all the facts on the table!

Below are screenshots of the pages.  Serious students should go to this post where I explained some of the numbers, categories etc.  But, I am far from an expert!

Documents like this (reporting the capacity of your town to ‘welcome’ refugees and from where) come in to Washington from hundreds of towns and cities and are put together to become the basis for the Presidential determination which we know is a maximum 45,000 refugees for FY18 (which is now underway as of Oct. 1).

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Again, knowledge is power!

I leave it to you, again with the help of this post to examine the plans that Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service in conjunction with the US State Department and the US Department of Health and Human Services have in the works for St. Cloud.

LOL! Do you see that line in the last chart about voluntary hours/miles?  What that represents is the number of hours and the miles that volunteers put on their own vehicles converted to a cash value.  The contractor uses that figure to show the federal government that they have put some skin in the game (it is supposed to be a public-private partnership after all).  I wonder do volunteers know that they are worth money to the contractor?

Check out the actual cash from foundations/corporations in FY16 and the enormous jump estimated for FY18.  Is that realistic? Can they just make up numbers?

Housing specialist? So the refugees get a housing specialist? Do just regular poor Americans get one from LSS of MN?

The most recent Form 990 for LSS of Minnesota is here (or see LSS financials page):

file:///C:/Users/Ann/AppData/Local/Temp/Lutheran%20Social%20Service%20of%20MN%20-%20Public%20Inspection%20Copy-1.pdf

Other contractors are operating in other cities in Minnesota. See here:

https://refugeeresettlementwatch.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/acb67-publicaffiliatedirectory1-6-17.pdf

What can you do?

Citizens in St. Cloud, see my complete archive on what I’ve reported about your city since 2008.

Concerned citizens elsewhere, go to the list of contractor/subcontractors I linked above. Call one near you and ask for the FY18 R & P Abstract (Reception and Placement Abstract).  Ask your local elected officials—mayor and council—if any of them have ever seen the plans for their town/city?

Addendum! If you get a runaround complain to your elected officials in Washington—your member of Congress and US Senators. If they can’t (or won’t!) get it for you, then you have even more to complain about!

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Muslim refugees, Pockets of Resistance, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Resettlement cities, Taxpayer goodies, The Opposition, Trump, What you can do, Where to find information, Who is going where | Tagged: , | 9 Comments »

First 98 of Trump’s refugees have arrived, see where they went

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 10, 2017

Tillerson and Trump

The new fiscal year (2018) is now ten days old and we see that the first of Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s and President Trump’s proposed 45,000 refugees have arrived!

According to Wrapsnet…..

Top ethnic groups arriving in the group of 98 are from the DR Congo (25), Bhutan (21) and Somalia (16).  For our friends in Minnesota know this: the Somalis were distributed to Missouri, New Hampshire, Washington and Wisconsin, but, as you know, they can and often do move within months to be with larger groups of Somalis in Minnesota, Ohio and in San Diego.

26 of the 98 are Muslims if you count the 4 Ahmadiyya from Pakistan who went to Maryland.

Here is where the first 98 were placed:

 

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Top five states are Michigan, Ohio, Iowa, Missouri and New Hampshire. Alaska and Hawaii got zip.

 

Posted in Muslim refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Trump Watch!, Where to find information, Who is going where | Tagged: | 24 Comments »

Guest column: Feds shifting costs to states for refugee resettlement

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 8, 2017

Editor: From time to time we post guest commentary. This is from Joanne Bregman. As we refocus our efforts at the state and local level, because we can’t count on Washington, this is an effective argument for you to make on the state level.

This is about States’ rights!

(emphasis below is mine)

Federal Cost Shifting of the Refugee Resettlement Program

Background

In 1980 the federal government formalized the refugee resettlement program by passing the Refugee Act of 1980. There was no mandate to force states to participate in this program. Federal appropriations to provide for medical and cash assistance for newly resettled refugees, was authorized for 36 months. Refugees were and still are, first required to use state Medicaid programs if they are eligible, before federal medical assistance funds are used.

When the federal law was passed, it provided that for each refugee brought to a state by a federal contractor, states would be reimbursed 100% for three full years, the state incurred cost of providing Medicaid and cash welfare. The law also provided, that for refugees who did not meet eligibility criteria for state Medicaid and cash welfare programs, they could instead, receive a federal subsidy – Refugee Medical Assistance (RMA) and Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA) for 36 months.

By 1991, even though the number of refugees being resettled was not decreasing, the federal government eliminated reimbursement to states for the state cost of resettling and supporting refugees with Medicaid and cash welfare.

In addition, the federal government reduced the RCA and RMA subsidy from 36 months to 8 months for refugees who do not qualify for state funded programs. States have no other choice but to assume the greater share of the voluntary federal program’s costs.

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The U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement told Congress early on in the program that the reason states were no longer being reimbursed for the state’s costs was because Congress didn’t appropriate enough money.

The 1981 Select Commission on Immigration and Refugee Policy convened by Congress also documented that even the initial 3 years of 100% reimbursement to states, was not sufficient to “minimize the impact of refugees on community services.” The Commission was specifically referring to schools, hospitals and community support services.

In 1990, the U.S. General Accounting Office documented that the reduction in reimbursement to states for the federal refugee resettlement program, “costs for cash and medical assistance have shifted to state and local governments.” The National Governors Association has also questioned the federal cost shifting, stating that “[t]hese reductions represent a major federal policy change that shifts fiscal responsibility for meeting the basic needs of refugees from the federal government to states and localities.”

As the resettlement industry has grown, so has the cost to both federal and state governments but only the federal government controls its costs by appropriating annually “as available” while each state’s cost is driven by how much of the federal cost Congress chooses not to pay.

Be sure to see my post from earlier this past week about what you need to do on a state and local level, here.

This post is filed in my ‘What you can do’ category and in Comments worth noting.’

Posted in Changing the way we live, Comments worth noting/guest posts, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Taxpayer goodies, What you can do, Where to find information | Tagged: | 13 Comments »

Report to Congress now available for FY18 refugee admissions

Posted by Ann Corcoran on October 5, 2017

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ttps://www.documentcloud.org/documents/4063604-Report-to-Congress-Proposed-Refugee-Admissions.html

 

I have to admit, I haven’t read it yet, but, for diehard grassroots investigators, know that the report is a treasure trove of information on the US Refugee Admissions Program and Trump’s 45,000 refugee ceiling *** for the year that began this past Sunday.

Don’t miss the tables at the end, often more useful than all the verbiage about why we need to save this or that ethnic group by hauling them to your town.

Here is the table that shows that the US admits the vast majority of permanent refugees.

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Be sure to keep this so that the next time some Open Borders pusher says that Lebanon, Turkey, Germany and Jordan are doing more, remind them that ours are PERMANENT, not temporary residents. (note that this table uses calendar year numbers when we usually use fiscal year)

 

And, here is a table showing the costs of just the resettlement (this year, FY18, for up to 45,000 refugees).

Come to think of it, when those economic studies are done to ostensibly show how much refugees benefit America, do they ever show that it will cost the US taxpayer over $1 BILLION just to get 45,000 bodies in here?

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Read the footnotes!

Please note that the anticipated costs do not include taxpayer funding for: educating the kids, Medicaid, some forms of cash assistance, food stamps, housing subsidies, interpreter costs, criminal justice system costs, etc.

Again, go here for the full report.  One of the things I’ve noted over the years is that the report has no date on the cover.  I can only guess that is because it is always very late and they don’t want any record of the fact that they skirt the law always on the whole determination/consultation process.

***Did you see that the Federation for American Immigration Reform called this a “responsible” number!  Have friends like these been in the swamp too long?

Readers should know, that until very recently FAIR has not taken much interest in the UN/US Refugee Admissions Program.

Posted in Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Taxpayer goodies, Trump, Where to find information | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Except for Somalia and Syria, new rules for travel to US won’t have much impact on refugee program

Posted by Ann Corcoran on September 26, 2017

In Trump’s new mixed bag, most of the eight countries are not significantly represented in the US Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP).

Editor:  By the way, I assume you saw that the Supreme Court has cancelled arguments on the previous travel ban, here I don’t know yet what that means for the refugee portion of the case.

Other than Somalia, Syria and Iran we don’t see many refugees from the other five countries. And, you should know, for Iran, that the vast majority of those we admit as refugees are Christians and other religious minorities.

As I remarked the other day, we do admit very large numbers of questionable refugees from Afghanistan, Iraq, Burma (Rohingya Muslims) and some additional African countries who will not be getting the extra scrutiny.

I checked Wrapsnet just now to see how many refugees we have admitted between FY07 and FY17 from the 8 ‘travel ban’ countries. But, don’t forget that many others from these countries get in to the US through other legal programs as well as illegally.

Refugees admitted FY07-FY17 (to date).  Here is what I found:

Chad (182)

Iran (38,236 but only 405 of those are Muslims while over 20,000 are Christians)

Libya (12)

N. Korea (203)

Syria (21,110)

Yemen (146)

Somalia (67,158)

Venezuela (13)

The new vetting rules may have a large impact on Somalis entering the US….

Check out here where all those Somalis have been planted.  Minnesota tops the list with 8,529. But that doesn’t tell the whole Minnesota story as Somalis resettled elsewhere move in large numbers as what the USRAP calls “secondary migrants” to MN.

 

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Alaska welcomed 294, but Hawaii (the state that loves diversity) welcomed zero!

 

Posted in Muslim refugees, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Supreme Court, Trump Watch!, Where to find information, Who is going where | Tagged: , , , | 4 Comments »

 
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