Refugee Resettlement Watch

Archive for the ‘Where to find information’ Category

Citizen researcher: Get “the plan” for your community before it goes to Washington

Posted by Ann Corcoran on April 20, 2015

Editor:  Every resettlement agency (contractor) must submit to its parent contractor (those top nine we harp about all the time) a plan for your town or city every year.  “The plan” (sometimes called an “abstract”) includes the number of refugees the local agency thinks they can accommodate and lists the resources/amenities your town has to offer the refugees.  These “plans” are never available for public review and comment, but are used by the US State Department and the Office of Refugee Resettlement to determine how much of your hard-earned taxpayer dollars are needed by the contractors.

A citizen activist in Tennessee has penned this important guest post so that you can learn how to obtain and research “the plan” for your community.

Last week we asked you to get your state plan, here.  Now it is time to get your local one.

Here are the resettlement subcontractors working in over 190 cities across the country.  Find one near you and ask for their “abstract” for FY2015.  Unfortunately 2015 has already been approved, but it will give you an idea of what they are doing at this minute in your city.

 As we approach FY2016, demand “the plan” before it goes to Washington.  FY2016 begins on October 1, 2015, so they are working on these now, or will be shortly.

Get the Plan Before Federal Contractors Bring Refugees to Your Community

By Joanne Bregman

Federal refugee resettlement contractors should be required to openly disclose their proposed plan to the receiving host community before it is accepted and funded by the federal government. These plans contain no proprietary information and should not be awarded public money without first being vetted, commented upon and accepted by the proposed receiving community.

This is especially important in the states being run as Wilson-Fish programs, which means that a federal contractor is in charge and the state government has no voice in the running of the program. In states where the program is run by the state government, not only would this be appropriate but state dollars appropriated to the program should be discussed openly and the priority questioned by the state legislature prior to adopting their annual budget.

This GAO Report was critical of the process for resettling refugees into local communities, but it seems to have disappeared down a black hole. We see no reform, or more transparency coming from its release nearly three years ago. http://www.gao.gov/assets/600/592975.pdf

Refugee resettlement is a government procured set of services that federal contractors are paid to provide. In fact, the resettlement contractors are paid for each individual refugee they bring to a community and as the 2012 GAO report noted:

“…local affiliate funding is based on the number of refugees they serve, so affiliates have an incentive to maintain or increase the number of refugees they resettle each year rather than allowing the number to decrease.”

The nine national voluntary agencies (VOLAGs) have affiliate (local) offices spread throughout the country, except for Wyoming where there is no refugee resettlement program.

Sometime before the start of the federal fiscal year (October 1 of the previous year) when these businesses get to find out how much public money they will receive, the local affiliate offices submit a resettlement proposal, sometimes called a “resettlement abstract.”

They “bid for bodies” and write narratives explaining why their location is a good place to resettle refugees. These “bids” are sent to their national VOLAG, which works with the State Department and the other VOLAGs to divide up the new fiscal year’s anticipated arrivals and the money that attaches to the arrivals.

The abstracts/annual resettlement plans include statements like “ELL [English Language Learner] services in the public schools are free.” Of course lots of other taxpayer- funded services such as Medicaid and cash welfare are also “free.”

They detail how many mosques might be in a location and how many languages are spoken by the agency’s staff members. They might include information about the ethnic composition of the seed communities they helped to start and the medical services available in a community. The plan might disclose the work of the resettlement agency’s “employment specialists” paid to get refugees employed ahead of unemployed Americans in the same community.

Here (below) is an example of a local resettlement plan; there should be a requirement that they be presented to local communities before being funded with public money. Until then, community members should inquire of the local resettlement organizations in their communities and when they are told (as they most likely will), that they do not have the information, move on to the national parent VOLAG office and request the documents.

This plan is an older one for Memphis, Tennessee:

Abstract 1Abstract 2

Abstract 3

abstract 4

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Comments worth noting/guest posts, Community destabilization, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Taxpayer goodies, Where to find information | Tagged: | 12 Comments »

Concerned about refugees coming to your state? Get your state plan!

Posted by Ann Corcoran on April 13, 2015

According to regulations promulgated under the Refugee Act of 1980, every state resettling refugees must submit a plan to the Office of Refugee Resettlement (at HHS) and keep it current.  That means every state, but Wyoming (so far).

 

This ORR map gives you some idea of the number of cities with refugee resettlement offices. They got ahead of themselves and put a Casper, WY office in when that program seems to be stalled. Map is here if you want to try to get a clearer look at it: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/orr/resource/fy2014-reception-and-placement-rp-network-affiliates-map

 

I would like everyone concerned about the Refugee Resettlement Program to contact your state coordinator today and ask for your state’s plan. 

The coordinators are listed here.  Tell them that according to the 45 CFR Section 400.4 and 400.5 they should have a current plan on file.

If you get a runaround, get their address and send them a formal letter.

Here are the regulations from 45 CFR Section 400.4:

(b) A State must certify no later than 30 days after the beginning of each Federal fiscal year that the approved State plan is current and continues in effect. If a State wishes to change its plan, a State must submit a proposed amendment to the plan. The proposed amendment will be reviewed and approved or disapproved in accordance with §400.8.

 

From Section 400.5,  this is what the plan must include:

The plan must:

(a) Provide for the designation of, and describe the organization and functions of, a State agency (or agencies) responsible for developing the plan and administering, or supervising the administration of, the plan;

(b) Describe how the State will coordinate cash and medical assistance with support services to ensure their successful use to encourage effective refugee resettlement and to promote employment and economic self-sufficiency as quickly as possible.

(c) Describe how the State will ensure that language training and employment services are made available to refugees receiving cash assistance, and to other refugees, including State efforts to actively encourage refugee registration for employment services;

(d) Identify an individual designated by the Governor or the appropriate legislative authority of the State, with the title of State Coordinator, who is employed by the State and will have the responsibility and authority to ensure coordination of public and private resources in refugee resettlement in the State;

(e) Provide for, and describe the procedures established for, the care and supervision of, and legal responsibility (including legal custody and/or guardianship under State law, as appropriate) for, unaccompanied refugee children in the State;

(f) Provide for and describe (1) the procedures established to identify refugees who, at the time of resettlement in the State, are determined to have medical conditions requiring, or medical histories indicating a need for, treatment or observation, and (2) the procedures established to monitor any necessary treatment or observation;

(g) Provide that assistance and services funded under the plan will be provided to refugees without regard to race, religion, nationality, sex, or political opinion; and

(h) Provide that the State will, unless exempted from this requirement by the Director, assure that meetings are convened, not less often than quarterly, whereby representatives of local resettlement agencies, local community service agencies, and other agencies that serve refugees meet with representatives of State and local governments to plan and coordinate the appropriate placement of refugees in advance of the refugees’ arrival. All existing exemptions to this requirement will expire 90 days after the effective date of this rule. Any State that wishes to be exempted from the provisions regarding the holding and frequency of meetings may apply by submitting a written request to the Director. The request must set forth the reasons why the State considers these meetings unnecessary because of the absence of problems associated with the planning and coordination of refugee placement. An approved exemption will remain in effect for three years, at which time a State may reapply.

(i) Provide that the State will:

(1) Comply with the provisions of title IV, Chapter 2, of the Act and official issuances of the Director;

(2) Meet the requirements in this part;

(3) Comply with all other applicable Federal statutes and regulations in effect during the time that it is receiving grant funding; and

(4) Amend the plan as needed to comply with standards, goals, and priorities established by the Director.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0960–0418)

[51 FR 3912, Jan. 30, 1986, as amended at 60 FR 33602, June 28, 1995; 65 FR 15443, Mar. 22, 2000]

Let us know what you find!

Posted in Refugee Resettlement Program, Where to find information | Tagged: | 17 Comments »

The path a refugee takes to America, note that the UN is the primary gatekeeper

Posted by Ann Corcoran on April 11, 2015

I found this flow chart this morning while researching my earlier Texas post and thought it might be useful for all of you asking what the steps are to enter the US.

Pay attention to the fact that they list war as a reason one could be a refugee, but in fact war itself is not a trigger for the internationally understood definition of “refugee” which says one must be PERSECUTED.   Here (below) is the definition of refugee (the word “war” is not mentioned).

Obama bastardizing the refugee definition!

It should be noted that ‘economic migrants,’ or people fearing crime in their home country, are also NOT refugees, but Obama is further bastardizing the definition to include the “children” from Central America!  (What is going to stop him from adding every poor country in the world to the program once he gets the Central American “refugee” program up and running?)

From Geneva Academy:

The Definition of a Refugee

International legal protection of refugees centres on a person meeting the criteria for refugee status as laid down in the 1951 Refugee Convention. Under Article 1(A)2, the term “refugee” shall apply to any person who:

“…owing to well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country; or who, not having a nationality and being outside the country of his former habitual residence as a result of such events, is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to return to it.”

Thus, according to this provision, refugees are defined by three basic characteristics:

* they are outside their country of origin or outside the country of their former habitual residence;

* they are unable or unwilling to avail themselves of the protection of that country owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted; and

* the persecution feared is based on at least one of five grounds: race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group, or political opinion.

It is important to stress that the term “asylum seekers” refers to persons, who have applied for asylum, but whose refugee status has not yet been determined.

See also, besides the UNHCR, that the federal contractors (VOLAGs), which monopolize the program, also control one of the steps.

From the Office of Refugee Resettlement:

Journey to Resettlement in the United States

Posted in Changing the way we live, Refugee Resettlement Program, Where to find information | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

Nine major federal resettlement contractors are choosing which towns get refugees; citizens kept in the dark

Posted by Ann Corcoran on April 7, 2015

People ask me all the time, who is targeting our towns? 

Frankly, it is the nine major federal contractors (not accountable to the US taxpayer!)*** contracted by the US State Department as you can see from this page at the US State Department website. (Emphasis is mine)

Have a look at Key Indicators for Resettlement “Stakeholders.” This one has FY2014 on the cover but they say it is for FY2015 (I haven’t seen the newest one yet). When the federal govt. and its contractors began to run into ‘pockets of resistance’ they instituted this planning process to try to figure out which states had the best goodies for refugees, so you might find it useful. For example if your state expanded Medicaid under Obamacare, you are a more likely target than a state that didn’t! http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/orr/news/key-indicators-for-refugee-placement-fy2015-report-released

US State Department:

Planning for Refugees’ Arrival in the United States

The Department of State works with nine domestic resettlement agencies that have proven knowledge and resources to resettle refugees. Every week, representatives of each of these nine agencies meet to review the biographic information and other case records sent by the overseas Resettlement Support Centers (RSC) to determine where a refugee will be resettled in the United States. During this meeting, the resettlement agencies match the particular needs of each incoming refugee with the specific resources available in a local community. If a refugee has relatives in the United States, he or she is likely to be resettled near or with them. Otherwise, the resettlement agency that agrees to sponsor the case decides on the best match between a community’s resources and the refugee’s needs.

Information about the sponsoring agency is communicated back to the originating RSC, which then works with the International Organization for Migration (IOM) to transport the refugee to his or her new home. The cost of refugee transportation is provided as a loan, which refugees are required to begin repaying after they are established in the United States.

Once in the United States

The Department of State has cooperative agreements with nine domestic resettlement agencies to resettle refugees. While some of the agencies have religious affiliations, they are not allowed to proselytize. The standard cooperative agreement between the Department of State and each of the domestic resettlement agencies specifies the services that the agency must provide to each refugee. All together, the nine domestic resettlement agencies place refugees in about 190 communities throughout the United States. Each agency headquarters maintains contact with its local affiliated agencies to monitor the resources (e.g., interpreters who speak various languages, the size and special features of available housing, the availability of schools with special services, medical care, English classes, employment services, etc.) that each affiliate’s community can offer.

Key points of this brief description:

1) The NON-Governmental resettlement contractors meet every week to talk about who is going where in the US depending on what resources your town has to offer.

2) Refugees must repay travel loans, however what they don’t tell you is that the contractor gives refugees dunning notices and then gets to keep 25% of the money (your tax dollars) they collect.  So we often see as much as $2-3 million additional income the contractor pockets from collecting these loans.

3) The sub-contractors (aka affiliates) in 190 towns and cities are monitoring the resources your town has and filtering that information back to the nine major contractors.  So why can’t they share that information with you—the citizens of the town?   Wouldn’t you like to know the availability of places in the school system for children who don’t speak English, availability of housing, what health care opportunities exist in YOUR town? Etc.  How about an impact statement prepared by the contractor and feds and available for public review in your town?

About the Key Indicators:  The feds and the contractors hold quarterly “placement consultation meetings.”  I have written and asked to be informed of the location of upcoming ones, but have never had my request answered.   Also, check the section on “secondary migration” which is when refugees settled in one state pick up and move to another, mostly to be with their own kind of people.  Top state for secondary migration is Minnesota.

This post is filed in our category ‘where to find information,’ here.

***Nine major federal contractors which like to call themselves VOLAGs (Voluntary agencies) which is such a joke considering how much federal money they receive:

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Refugee Resettlement Program, Taxpayer goodies, Where to find information, Who is going where | Tagged: , | 4 Comments »

RRW Monthly round-up for March 2015; Top month ever!

Posted by Ann Corcoran on April 2, 2015

Thanks to social media expert Kelly, March 2015 is the top month for readers at RRW in our almost 8 years of publishing the only website in the world (that we know of!) focusing specifically on problems with the US Refugee Admissions Program and asylum and refugee problems worldwide.

 

Our highest number of visitors ever was on March 26th during the same week that our facebook page reached over 200,000!

The Top Posts for the month were these (see our Top Daily posts in the right hand sidebar):

1.  Breaking News!  Spartanburg, SC targeted to be colonized as next refugee seed community

2.  Tensions grow in St. Cloud, MN as more Somalis move in with help of Lutherans

3.  Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota is responsible for the Somali chaos in St. Cloud

Honorable mention and not far behind is a post every new reader must read!

Ten things your town needs to know when (if!) welcoming refugees for the first time

Top ten countries from which readers arrived this month (excluding the US) are:

Canada

UK

Australia

Germany

European Union

Netherlands

Sweden

South Africa

France

Thailand

For new readers….

Normally, in one of these updates we have a section explaining to new readers how to use RRW and find information, but we’ll let you check out that information at our last weekly update, here, archived at our category entitled ‘blogging,’ here.

Posted in blogging, Refugee Resettlement Program, Where to find information | Tagged: | Comments Off on RRW Monthly round-up for March 2015; Top month ever!

Top languages spoken by refugees admitted to the US—Arabic is #1

Posted by Ann Corcoran on April 1, 2015

Although I have posted on this before, for all of our new readers, here it is again.  This is from the Refugee Processing Center which is the US State Department’s data collection site for refugee information.

Just remember!  When your town “welcomes” refugees, you will receive refugees from many places. You cannot choose your refugees by saying, only send me the nice Christians from Burma or the Congo, for example.

And, since the Clinton Executive order (which Bush refused to rescind), your local and state government (you, the taxpayer) are responsible for supplying translators for all sorts of problems that crop up in schools, health departments, hospitals, the criminal justice system and anywhere else federal money is involved.

Translation services are becoming one of the most significant (and costly) cottage industries orbiting within the refugee resettlement industry.

Here are the top ten languages spoken by refugees entering the US (from Fiscal Year 2008 to the end of the first quarter of FY 2015 (December 31, 2014))

    Arrivals
Rank Native Language FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 Cumulative Total
1 Arabic 9,767 13,675 15,199 7,372 9,938 17,230 17,859 4,430 95,470
2 Nepali 5,302 13,450 12,355 14,993 15,114 9,164 8,484 1,304 80,166
3 Sgaw Karen 7,460 3,331 5,833 6,521 4,148 5,011 4,115 1,046 37,465
4 Somali 2,402 3,879 4,787 3,057 4,763 7,295 8,449 2,664 37,296
5 Spanish 4,247 4,831 4,951 2,976 2,075 4,429 4,305 778 28,592
6 Chaldean 2,897 3,783 2,550 1,392 1,790 1,954 1,328 204 15,898
7 Burmese 3,769 2,040 1,414 1,290 1,146 1,523 1,066 233 12,481
8 Armenian 3,625 3,444 1,798 747 387 875 1,190 263 12,329
9 Kayah 0 5,267 1,922 1,179 595 784 637 136 10,520
10 Other Minor Languages 1,788 1,913 1,667 673 1,006 1,277 1,124 242 9,690
  Total 41,257 55,613 52,476 40,200 40,962 49,542 48,557 11,300

339,907

 

Do you see that low Somali number for 2008, that is the year that the US State Department shut down the Somali family reunification program when they discovered wide spread fraud—-Somalis were lying on their applications and found not to be related at all to those they claimed were kin.  Surprised?  You shouldn’t be!

Posted in Changing the way we live, Community destabilization, health issues, Muslim refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information | Tagged: , | 7 Comments »

US immigrant population reaches record level

Posted by Ann Corcoran on March 24, 2015

I was looking for something else and came across this informative article at the Migration Policy Institute (MPI).  I’ve written critically, here in 2011, about MPI which advances an Open borders agenda sandwiched between articles like this one entitled: ‘Frequently Requested Statistics on Immigrants and Immigration in the United States.’  I assume their statistics are accurate. Check it out!

Building the Democratic Party voter base!

Table 1: Numerical Size and Share of the Foreign-Born Population in the United States, 1970-2013

Source: Migration Policy Institute tabulation of data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2010 and 2013 American Community Surveys, and 1970-2000 decennial Census data.

 

 

They have another report with just Refugee and Asylee data updated last year, here.

This post is archived in our ‘where to find information’ category.

Posted in Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information | Tagged: | Comments Off on US immigrant population reaches record level

How many refugees did your state “welcome” in FY2014? Where were they from?

Posted by Ann Corcoran on March 16, 2015

Sorry readers, after being away from the computer these last three days, I am woefully behind—lots of stories have passed me by.  Going to try to catch up!

If this looks familiar it is! But, we have so many new readers it bears repeating.

Just before I left, reader P.K. sent me this link for data at the federal Office of Refugee Resettlement that I hadn’t seen in such a handy fashion.  We did previously give a year-end wrap-up last October here where the numbers were slightly different, but close.

We are repeating this news for the many new readers who have joined us since then.

By the way, although we resettled 69,986 refugees in FY2014, that is not the complete story.  The Office of Refugee Resettlement was responsible for over 30,000 asylees and another 58,000 ‘unaccompanied alien children’ being treated as refugees as well  (and, cared for with your tax dollars!)

Top resettlement states for FY 2014 are as follows:

Texas (7,214) Turning red states blue? Someone needs to tell Ted!

California (6,108)

New York (4,082)

Michigan (4,006)

Florida (3,519)

Arizona (2,964)

Ohio (2,815)

Pennsylvania (2,739)

Georgia (2,694)

Illinois (2,578)

Also three other states topped 2,000:  Washington (2,483), North Carolina (2,443) and Minnesota (2,232).

Be sure to visit the Office of Refugee Resettlement here to see where in the world your refugees came from.

What is a fiscal year?  For the purposes of refugee resettlement, a fiscal year runs from October 1 of the previous year to September 30th of the present year.  So, that means we have now completed 5 months of fiscal year 2015.

This post is archived in our ‘Where to find information’ category as well as in ‘Refugee statistics.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information, Who is going where | Tagged: , | 6 Comments »

Hurry! Get those New Americans their citizenship before September 2016 (government grants fueling the process)

Posted by Ann Corcoran on March 5, 2015

Since I’ve been fixated on the Obama plan to replace (old) Americans with New Americans.  You know the “seedling” plan!   And, then we learned that there is even a non-profit group funded by big money foundations also pushing for immigrants to get their legal permanent resident status swapped for citizenship called the New Americans Campaign, you should know that your tax dollars are fueling the process!

As if it’s any surprise, we learned in our previous post that immigrants most often vote for the Democratic Party!

Citizenship class in Maryland run jointly by Casa de Maryland and AmeriCorps. Your tax dollars at work! http://www.citizenshipmd.org/classes/

From the Dept. of Homeland Security (USCIS) comes this pipeline flowing with your money to ‘non-profits’ to get those immigrants signed up pronto! before a deadline of September 2016 (gee, I wonder what the rush might be!).  (hat tip: Richard at Blue Ridge Forum):

Citizenship and Integration Grant Program

On Sept. 18, 2014, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced the award of nearly $10 million in grants to 40 organizations that will help permanent residents prepare and apply for U.S. citizenship. Located in 24 states and the District of Columbia, these organizations will receive federal funding to support citizenship preparation services for permanent residents through September 2016.

[….]

Grant recipients are public or private nonprofit organizations with recent experience providing citizenship instruction and naturalization application services to permanent residents. They include public school systems, community and faith-based groups, adult education organizations, and literacy organizations.

Recipient organizations are geographically diverse and represent both traditional immigrant destinations and new immigrant gateways across 24 states and the District of Columbia. Grant recipients plan to provide citizenship instruction and naturalization application services to approximately 22,000 permanent residents from more than 50 countries. Grant recipients represent:

Eighteen of the top 20 states with the largest permanent resident populations (California, New York, Florida, Texas, Illinois, Massachusetts, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Washington, Michigan, North Carolina, Arizona, Ohio, Minnesota, Colorado, and Connecticut);

Eight of the top 10 metropolitan areas with the most new permanent residents in the past 10 years (New York City, Los Angeles, Miami, greater Washington, Chicago, Houston, Boston, and Atlanta); and

Nine of the top 10 states with the most naturalizations over the last two years (California, New York, Florida, Texas, Illinois, Virginia, Massachusetts, Georgia and Pennsylvania).

So who are the groups with their hands out to the feds through this one program (obviously, AmeriCorps has another funding stream).  We recognize many refugee resettlement contractors on the list.

FY 2014 Grant Recipients

Grant recipients are (in alphabetical order):

ORGANIZATION LOCATION
Asian Counseling and Referral Service Seattle, Wash.
Asian Services in Action, Inc. Akron, Ohio
Baltimore City Community College Baltimore, Md.
Boat People SOS, Inc. Houston, Texas
Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Santa Rosa Santa Rosa, Calif.
Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Stockton Stockton, Calif.
Catholic Charities of Northeast Kansas Overland Park, Kan.
Catholic Charities of San Bernardino and Riverside Counties San Bernardino, Calif.
Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County San Jose, Calif.
Catholic Migration Services, Inc. Brooklyn, N.Y.
Center for People in Need Lincoln, Neb.
Central American Resource Center Washington, D.C.
Chinese American Service League, Inc. Chicago, Ill.
Church World Service, Inc. Greensboro, N.C.
City of Littleton Littleton, Colo.
Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles Los Angeles, Calif.
Colombian American Service Association Miami, Fla.
Council for the Spanish Speaking, Inc. Milwaukee, Wis.
Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon Portland, Ore.
Federation Employment and Guidance Services, Inc. New York, N.Y.
Fresno Unified School District Fresno, Calif.
Hartford Public Library Hartford, Conn.
Hispanic Unity of Florida, Inc. Hollywood, Fla.
Hope Community Center, Inc. Apopka, Fla.
Horizon Cross Cultural Center Orange, Calif.
International Institute of Metropolitan Detroit Detroit, Mich.
International Rescue Committee, Inc. Atlanta, Ga.
International Rescue Committee, Inc. Glendale, Calif.
International Rescue Committee, Inc. Miami, Fla.
Jewish Family and Children’s Service Pittsburgh, Pa.
Jewish Family and Children’s Service Waltham, Mass.
Literacy Volunteers of Charlottesville/Albemarle Charlottesville, Va.
Lutheran Social Services of South Dakota Sioux Falls, S.D.
Lutheran Social Services of the Southwest Tucson, Ariz.
Mid-Minnesota Legal Assistance Minneapolis, Minn.
Nashville Adult Literacy Council, Inc. Nashville, Tenn.
Northern Manhattan Coalition for Immigrant Rights New York, N.Y.
Refugee Aid Project San Antonio, Texas
World Relief Corporation of National Association of Evangelicals Wheaton, Ill.
Young Men’s Christian Association of the Greater Houston Area, Inc.

 

http://www.uscis.gov/about-us/citizenship-and-integration-grant-program

Posted in 2016 Presidential campaign, Changing the way we live, Community destabilization, Obama, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Taxpayer goodies, Where to find information | Tagged: , | 7 Comments »

US Census: Immigrant population boom happening now

Posted by Ann Corcoran on March 5, 2015

This is the headline from the UK Daily Mail yesterday.  You may have already seen it:

White US children will be minorities by 2020 after immigrant ‘baby boom’, Census reveals

 

In the infographic linked below, the author of Diversity Explosion tells of all the warm and wonderful things that will come to America as diversity expands and blossoms—one of those wonderful new frontiers will happen with governance as the immigrants, we are told, will mostly register as Democratic voters!

 

Here are the first few paragraphs:

White children will be outnumbered by minority kids in the United States in just five years, new Census Bureau projections reveal.

This is the result of an ongoing trend of declining birth among white Americans and a baby boom among immigrant groups, as well as a surge in immigration.

By the year 2020, 50.2 percent of all children in the US are expected to be non-white, according to the Census. By 2044, whites will be outnumbered by minorities.

The Census study, released this week, predicts that by year 2060, nearly 20 percent of the population will be foreign born – thanks to an influx of 64million new immigrants.

The “seedlings” are sprouting at a rapid rate!  We are being replaced and Obama is one step ahead of us.

Read it all and see the graphs.  Be sure to click on the cute little infographic by Brookings where we are told in gleeful tones that the immigrants will vote Democratic (so as to get their government goodies?)!  See the book, here.

 

Posted in Changing the way we live, Community destabilization, diversity's dark side, Obama, So what did they expect?, Taxpayer goodies, Where to find information | Tagged: , , | 5 Comments »

 
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