Refugee Resettlement Watch

Archive for the ‘Where to find information’ Category

Obama looking to ‘welcome’ 213,000 humanitarian arrivals in FY17 with $2.2 billion budget

Posted by Ann Corcoran on August 15, 2016

…..and that $2.2  billion is only for the Office of Refugee Resettlement (HHS) portion of the costs!  It does not include the US State Department funding or the cost of security screening. Nor does it cover the cost of most welfare, subsidized housing, medical care and most of the cost of educating the children.  They aren’t saying yet how many Syrians Obama will be requesting.

While I was on my 30 day ‘listening tour’ that took me to 13 mid-western and western states, the Obama Administration held a press conference call about the stepped-up Syrian Muslim refugee flow in to the US.  Thanks to Christine for sending the transcript which I decided to post below in full.

Just so you know, all of the officials on the call are Obama appointees.  Remember them! These are the people who are changing the demographics and the character of your home towns.

Anne Richard and Robert Carey both revolved in to their government perches from a refugee resettlement contracting agency (the International Rescue Committee). Shin Inouye is a former Washington, DC spokesman for the ACLU.  And, for my friends in Montgomery County, MD, León Rodríguez was once your county attorney.

These Obama appointees are all hard core open (NO!) borders advocates, and if Hillary is elected they will likely be able to stay on and continue their work of changing America by changing the people!

And, if you are wondering, Obama has one more shot in September to make a determination about how many refugees will be admitted to the US in the next fiscal year.

We know what Obama is going to do, but what will Paul Ryan do?

It will be up to Speaker Paul Ryan and the REPUBLICANS to decide if the numbers Obama is requesting will be acceptable because it is Congress that will fund (or not fund!) the President’s final request!

This (below) is from a press conference call on August 5th. Those of you doing research around the country on what is happening where you live will find this useful.

BTW, I am struck by how little the reporters know about the program and so they largely wasted their questions.

See phone numbers at the end for the public affairs office of each government agency responsible for the refugee program.  If you are reporting via alternative media about what is happening where you live, try calling those numbers!  Call and ask questions even if you already know the answers!

 

Coordinator: 

Welcome and thank you for standing by. At this time all participants are in a listen-only mode until the Question and Answer session of today’s conference. At that time you may press Star 1 on your phone to ask a question.

I would like to inform all parties that today’s conference is being recorded. If you have any objections you may disconnect at this time. I would now like to turn the conference over to Shin Inouye, USCIS. Thank you, you may begin.

Shin Inouye:   

inouyeshin

Inouye

Thank you (Sheila) and thank you all for joining us today to discuss the current state of Syrian refugees security screening and admissions. As a reminder this call is on the record and without embargo. On the call we have Assistant Secretary of State, The Bureau of Population Refugees and Migration, Anne C. Richard, US Citizenship and Immigration Services or USCIS Director Leon Rodriguez, and Health and Human Services Director of Refugee Resettlement, Robert “(Bob)” Carey.

We’ll have our speakers offer remarks about their agency’s respective roles in the refugee process and then open up the call to your questions. Let me first turn it over to Assistant Secretary Richard.

Anne Richard:  

Thanks, this is Anne speaking. The United States has been a global leader in the resettlement of refugees. That’s why last year the President made a renewed commitment to help in some of the most vulnerable refugees in the world, pledging to increase the number of refugees we will accept from around the world to 85,000 from 70,000 per year over the last three years. As part of this commitment we also pledged to welcome at least 10,000 refugees fleeing the terrible conflict in Syria.

Anne Richard

Richard

To that end early in the fiscal year we began working to adjust the capacity of our refugee admissions program, to bring many more refugees to the United States. To welcome more refugees from Syria we worked with the Department of Homeland Security, with our intelligence community and with other relevant agencies to upgrade our capacities to conduct security screening. DHS increased the number of the DHS offices available to interview applicants so that more security screening interviews could take place for more applicants, resulting in more refugees approved for travel.

In Jordan, for example, between February and April of this year we worked with DHS to surge additional staff to Jordan where DHS offices conducted interviews for about 12,000 UNHCR referred refugee applicants. In Beirut, Lebanon we restarted interviews of refugees in February. These had stopped for a year because of space limitations in the embassy compound. In Turkey we added staff to the resettlement support center in Istanbul that covers refugee processing in Turkey and Lebanon and DHS sent additional officers to conduct interviews.

In Iraq we began processing refugee resettlement cases in Erbil in December 2015. Thanks to these efforts and through the coordinated efforts of the Department of State, Department of Homeland Security, Department of Health and Human Services, we can now say that we have 8,000 Syrian refugees so far this year and that we are very confident that we will welcome at least 10,000 refugees from Syria by the end of this fiscal year. Monthly totals have climbed from low numbers of refugees admitted in the first half of the year to higher numbers recently.

In May, June and July the impact of our investments in and the enhancements to the process began to be realized. Our expectation from the beginning was that the rate of Syrian refugee admissions would increase over time as referrals from UNHCR — the Human Refugee Agency — UNHCR increased as we added to the capacity to process more cases referred to us and as DHS sent more DHS officers to the field to conduct the necessary rigorous and exhaustive security screening.

Briefly and in closing we want to reiterate that this is just one line of multiple lines of effort that the US government is undertaking to help the victims of terrible conflicts and crisis around the world. I want to remind you all that President Obama will convene the leader’s summit on refugees on the margins of the 71st session of the UN General Assembly in September. This summit is about encouraging all countries to take action and do more now.

Wealthy governments are asked to make new and significant contributions relating to humanitarian financing and refugee resettlement or admissions – other forms of admission to their country. Countries that host refugees are asked to make new commitments related to refugee self-reliance and inclusion, with a specific focus on letting refugees work and allowing refugee children to go to school. The purpose of the summit is to recruit other countries to join with us and make a real difference in the world’s contributions towards helping refugees.

At this point I’d like to turn to my colleague, the head of USCIS, Leon Rodriguez.

Leon Rodriguez:  

Thank you Anne and thank you for your presentation. I too am gratified with the success that we’ve had in refugee admissions, particularly with respect to Syrian admissions. The process that we have applied to reach those admission levels is the same process that we have applied for many years – actually with a few enhancements that have further strengthened that process.

LeonRodriguez

Rodriguez

There are basically two critical components to the process and adjudicating, whether an individual is admitted to the United States as a refugee after that individual has been referred to us by the United Nations high commissioner and refugees and by the State Department. The first is to determine – this is what our officers do to determine whether that individual actually qualifies as a refugee – whether they meet the legal definition.

The legal definition that we use is derived from the United Nation’s convention on refugees, and that definition is used by all of the signatory countries to the convention, although in many cases each country interprets the conventions slightly differently. The second aspect and probably particularly critical for this discussion is we determined if — notwithstanding the fact that the individual meets the legal definition of refugee — if there is still some basis to deny that individual admission to the United States.

That can occur in one of two ways. In some cases we have – we exercise our discretion. For example if we have concerns about that individual’s credibility. In other cases we may have evidence that that individual falls under a specific category of inadmissibility. For example, if there is evidence that they are a known or suspected terrorist. To do that we used a number of tools. From my perspective the most critical of those tools is the refugee officer – is our highly trained, highly experienced staff that we deployed throughout the world to screen refugees.

Before they get there they have been extensively trained both in the legal tenants surrounding refugee law — the grounds inadmissibility that I discussed before — but also very critically in fraud detection and prevention, security protocols, interviewing techniques, credibility analysis.

They’ve also been briefed in country conditions and in regional conditions and again that briefing is often extensive, and the depth of that briefing grows as we spend more time in a particular refugee environment, be that the Syrian environment, the Iraqi environment, the Somalian environment, or as the case may be, the central American environment. The interviews that are conducted by those officers are frequently extensive – pro-credibility issues and pro-particular basis of inadmissibility.

In the specific cases of Syrians there are additional steps that are also taken. All of those cases or the majority of those cases, rather, are subject to something we call Syrian enhanced review, which provides us specific in-depth support both from our Refugee Affairs division and our Fraud Detection and National Security directorate to provide enhanced view of those cases before the interviews even occur overseas. This is intelligence-driven support – for example it yields specific lines of questioning that our officers are prepared to ask.

It also includes social media review of certain Syrian refugee applicants. Additionally and during the course of the interview an officer identifies areas of national security concern about a candidate, and that case moves into what we call the controlled application review and resolution process – essentially a hold process where further investigation and inquiry into that case occurs.

At the same time we have a number of law enforcement and intelligence resources that our officers utilize in order to determine whether there is any derogatory — and that’s a critical term — derogatory information about that individual. Those sources can come from State Department databases, databases of customs and border protection, the Department of Defense, but most critically from both the United States law enforcement and intelligence communities, including the FBI as well as a number of intelligence community partners as well.

One particularly important aspect there is a process that we call the intra-agency check which involves queries of a series of intelligence community holdings. That occurs not only prior to the interview of the individual but actually occurs on the recurrent basis during the entire process of that individual’s adjudication, and in many cases actually beyond the period of that individual’s admissions. So that if new derogatory information arises about that individual we are able to act on that derogatory individual – derogatory information at any time that that information may arise.

We have on an ongoing basis the implementing improvements to these processes – much of that is law enforcement sensitive or intelligence community protected. But those improvements have been occurring on an ongoing basis. I believe that this information is very critical because it really rebuts what is a widely held view that in fact we do not have resources against which to vet these individuals.

In fact literally hundreds of individuals from different countries, including hundreds of individuals from Syria, have had their admissions to the United States denied because of information that was found in these databases. Additionally, a number of other individuals have been denied admissions or have been placed on hold because we have determined – we have accessed that there are credibility concerns that have arisen during the interview process.

And that process is the same one that we conducted a year ago, two years ago and last week, and we will continue as we move through the process of screening refugees to apply those methodologies. Thank you.

Shin Inouye:     

Thank you Director Rodriguez. Next we’ll hear from Director Carey.

Robert Carey: 

bob carey

Carey

Okay thank you. (Bob) Carey here. We could go to the work of your Office of Refugee Resettlement, under the Refugee Act of 1980 Congress created within the Department of Health and Human Service and the Office of Refugee Resettlement, and we are charged with providing refugees with resettlement assistance. This assistance includes employment training and placement, English language instruction, cash assistance and additional social services, all of which are designed to assist refugees in integrating into their new communities and to promote early self-sufficiency.

ORR carries out this work through an extensive public-private partnership network and funding to state governments and non-profit organizations across the US. In fiscal year 2016 ORR expects to serve upwards of 200,000 humanitarian migrants. So these humanitarian migrants include refugees, but also asylees, keeping Asian entrance on unaccompanied refugee minors, victims of torture and unaccompanied children.

Our work includes collaborations at the federal and state level with resettlement agencies, resettled refugees themselves and members of the communities that welcomed them. A central goal of the program is to ensure that states and municipalities have the best information available to help them prepare for incoming refugees. To this end each state has a state refugee coordinator, and often a state refugee health coordinator who oversees services and refugee benefits provisioned to eligible individuals in the given state.

The President’s fiscal year 2017 budget requests include $2.2 billion for ORR programs and that represents the cost of maintaining services for additional refugees and other entrance and unaccompanied children primarily from Central America. The President’s budget request would support a total of 213,000 humanitarian arrivals including 100,000 refugees in 2017. Once a refugee arrives in the US they are eligible to access the same benefits as American citizens who are here legally including temporary aide to newly families, Medicaid, SSI, and SNAP.

When refugees do not meet eligibility requirements for these programs ORR provides time-limited refugee cash assistance and refugee medical assistance. Social services and targeted assistance funds are allocated to states based on a formula tied to the prior two years of refugee arrivals, and that accounts for refugees and other entrance movements to other states after their initial resettlement on their path to legal permanent residence and citizenship.

ORR also supports additional programs to refugees and integrating which include migrant enterprise development assistance for ethnic community organizations, agricultural partnerships and services for survivors of torture. Another critical service we provide is school impact program funding which provides approximately $15 million for activities that assists children in adjusting to school after the trauma of war flight and all too often interrupted education.

As an alternative to access and cash assistance refugees may also enroll in what is known as the Matching Grant program – that’s Intensive Case Management program conducted by private non-profit organizations which assists refugees in finding employment and in economic self-sufficiency – self-sufficiency within four to six months after their arrival in the US and which is funded with a combination of private and government funds. And at the end of the program last year 82% were self-sufficient at the end of 180 days. [This is a joke, refugees can still be receiving most forms of welfare, such as food stamps and housing help and still be labeled “self-sufficient.”—-ed]

In summary, the Office of Refugee Resettlement stands committed to welcoming integrating newcomers into the fabric of our society. We believe this goal benefits not only refugees and their families, but strengthens communities and our nation as a whole and refugee resettlement is a reflection of our core value of who we are as a country, providing protection to individuals fleeing persecution on the basis of their race, religion, political opinions or membership in a social group. So thank you.

Shin Inouye:   

Thank you Director Carey and thank you to all of our speakers. Operator if we can go ahead and open it up or if you could provide the instructions for how folks can ask questions.

Coordinator:

Thank you. We will now begin the Question and Answer session. If you would like to ask a question please press Star 1 to unmute your phone and record your name clearly. If you need to withdraw your question press Star 2. Again to ask a question please press Star 1.

Our first question comes from Julia Edwards with Reuters – your line is open.

Julia Edwards:      

Hi, thank you. I was wondering if you could quantify how many refugees or how refugees were not considered after the additional screening procedures that were put in place by Congress at the end of last year? Or was there anyone who was ruled out as a result of this additional screening measures being put in place?

Leon Rodriguez: 

I think that the screening measures were never actually voted into effect that you’re discussing, so when I talk about screening measures they’re basically the ones that we apply as our part of our ordinary process – that is joined between USCIS, State Department, the law enforcement intelligence community partners. And again what I would say is based on that screening – just speaking to the Syrian case, you know, hundreds – I wouldn’t be able to put a specific number on it now but hundreds have been denied.

There are even larger numbers of individuals who go on hold because concerns have been raised or – and also individuals who are denied on a credibility basis because our officers determined that there are concerns about the accounts that they’re given when we interview them.

Coordinator:       

Our next question comes from Julie Davis with the New York Times. Your line is open.

Julie Davis:  

Hi there. Well I was hoping you could be more specific about how many of the Syrian applicants had been denied because of the information that was found on the databases or put on hold because of credibility concerns. It sounds like you don’t have those numbers now. Would that be something you could get to us after the call potentially?

Leon Rodriguez:   

Yes we can see if we can get you those numbers. Again what I will share are those numbers are large. When we’re talking still about, you know, we’re talking about 8,000 who have been cleared for admission this year we’re still talking about a substantial number who have either been denied or held because of these types of concerns.

Julie Davis:      

Okay and also I’m wondering whether you can say, based on the up-ticks that you described, just in May, June, July – I assume August, you’re expecting will be the same if not larger in terms of refuge – Syrian refugees resettled. Do you expect that to continue rising into fiscal 2017, and do you have any estimate at all of how many Syrian refugees you may be looking at welcoming as a result of this surge in the next, you know, after the fiscal year ends?

Leon Rodriguez:

Actually I’m going to share a little bit more of an answer to your first question and I think I’m going to defer to my State Department colleagues. So our approval rates are 80%, denial rate is 7%, and the balance is hold – that kind of reflects the overall universe. So, you know, I can’t give you specific numbers that reflects about our clip of approvals denials and holds.

Julie Davis:     

Got it.

Leon Rodriguez:  

And Anne I’m wondering if you want to – I don’t know if you’re in a position to talk about next year or not…

Anne Richard:   

Well just to say the current pace of arrivals will continue through the end of this fiscal year so we may exceed 10,000 and for next year we will continue to welcome large numbers of Syrians, but it’s too soon to have a target figure established.

Coordinator:     

Thank you. And our next question comes from Jared Goyette with PRI. Your line is open.

Jared Goyette:  

Hi I was just wondering if you could provide any detail to the I-130 program and if that’s had any impact in terms of the numbers of, you know, the number of Syrian refugees coming in – that’s of course the family petition? Thank you.

Anne Richard:  

No we don’t have numbers for you for this call but we can follow-up on that after the call.

Jared Goyette:

Okay thanks.

Coordinator:   

The next question comes from Nick Ballasy with PJ Media News your line is open.

Nicholas Ballasy: 

Thanks for taking the question. My first – the first part of my question is among the applications for refugee status that have been denied, you said some of them were denied – was it because of national security or terrorism issues? And then the second part of my question is as you know, if you’re applying for legal status by marrying a US citizen or in a different category, you have to prove you have the financial support and you’re not a public charge and you also have to pay thousands of dollars in fees for those applications.

Why are refugees treated differently than people seeking legal status in the United States through the legal immigration process?

Leon Rodriguez:   

Sure, this is Leon Rodriguez and I’ll invite my colleagues to chime in as well. You know, the fact is that refugees are refugees because they’re often coming out of war-torn countries or countries devastated in some other way. Frequently individuals have been living away from their countries without any means of securing a livelihood, or in many cases when we’re talking about Syrians, of having their children educated. So more typically individuals do not have the economic wherewithal. It’s also – frankly it’s a statutory decision that was made. We do not have authority to charge any kind of fee for refugees – it’s not a legal authority that we have.

Nicholas Ballasy:  

And then the issue of the denied applications, was the reason for any of those denials national security or…

Leon Rodriguez: 

Yes.

Nicholas Ballasy:

…(test) and concerns?

Leon Rodriguez: 

Yes.

Shin Inouye:      

All right (Sheila) if you could move to the next question please?

Coordinator:   

Absolutely and as a reminder if you would like to ask a question you can press Star 1 on your phone and record your name when prompted. Our next question comes from Lauren Ashburn with EWTN. Your line is open.

Lauren Ashburn:   

Thank you very much and thank you for taking my call. The percentage of those Syrian refugees who have been let into the country – what percent are Muslims? Do you have that breakdown?

Anne Richard:     

Yes, most are Muslims over 99% are Muslims. [At least she is being honest! But, the reporter wasted her question because that information is readily available elsewhere.—ed]

Lauren Ashburn:  

And then what percent are of religious (execution) are fleeing (because they) say religious persecution?

Anne Richard:   

I don’t have that breakdown for you.

Lauren Ashburn:  

Okay and then you mentioned, Secretary Carey – you mentioned that 82% are self-sufficient at the end of 180 days and I was wondering how long do the rest of them stay on benefits? How long do you extend the benefits?

Robert Carey:    

The benefits access depends on the category. There are some individuals for whom, you know, refugee cash assistance can be extended for up to eight months for certain individuals, and then others may be eligible for mainstream benefits if they fit the qualifications.

Lauren Ashburn:   

Okay, thanks.

Coordinator:  

Our next question comes from (Esa Gomez) with ABC News. Your line is open.

(Esa Gomez):    

I was wondering out of the 8,000 of the admitted refugees how many of them were children?

Anne Richard:      

I should – we should have that number for you. Seventy eight percent were women and children and the number of children we’ll have to get you but let’s see  – nearly – let’s see, 4,576 were under 18 – just a little under half female and roughly half male of the children. [Does this really give us any comfort when we know it is the Somali “children” who grew up in America that have been the most radicalized of the Muslim migrants?—ed]

(Esa Gomez):   

Is that of the children or women and children?

Anne Richard:     

So the first number I gave you the 78% were women and children. And then the second that’s 78% out of 8,000. And then the number of children is – or under 18 year olds is 4,576 and they’re roughly half and half men and – girls and boys rather.

(Esa Gomez):       

Oh okay, thank you.

Coordinator: 

And again as a reminder you can press Star 1 on your phone and record your name if you have a question. One moment please for any additional questions. We are showing no further questions at this time. (Unintelligible)…

Shin Inouye: 

(Unintelligible) (a couple). All right, well thank you (Sheila). Thank you all for joining us. As a reminder this call is on the record and without embargo. If you have any additional questions here are the phone numbers for the respective public affairs offices for the participants on the call. The State Department is at 202-647-2492. Once again The State Department is 202-647-2492. USCIS is at 202-272-1200. Once again USCIS is at 202-272-1200. And HHS is at 202-401-9215. Once again HHS is at 202-401-9215. Thank you very much.

Coordinator:     

That does conclude today’s conference. Thank you for participating. You may disconnect at this time.

This post is filed in our ‘where to find information’ category, here.

Posted in 2016 Presidential campaign, Colonization, Muslim refugees, Obama, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Taxpayer goodies, The Opposition, Where to find information | Tagged: , | 14 Comments »

VT Health Dept admits: three cases of ACTIVE TB in Vermont in last seven months

Posted by Ann Corcoran on July 7, 2016

And, their treatment expenses are coming out of your wallets! Isn’t diversity beautiful!

See our previous post—-what is Vermont hiding?

TB cdc

This CDC info graphic says even Latent TB cases entering the US must be identified and treated. So what is all this costing us?

 

 

More from Michael Patrick Leahy at Breitbart:

A spokesperson for the Vermont Department of Health confirms to Breitbart News that “three refugees [have been] diagnosed with TB in Vermont over the past seven months.”

One case was diagnosed in December 2015, and the other two cases were diagnosed in 2016.

No one other than a refugee has been diagnosed with active TB in Vermont during the first six months of 2016, the spokesperson adds.

The stunning admission comes after Breitbart News reported that the number of active TB cases in Vermont tripled from two in 2014 to seven in 2015.

More here.

I don’t want to become an expert on refugee health, but you might be interested if you have some connection to the medical field or are in regular close contact with the refugees newly arriving in the US.

Just now I had a look at the Centers for Disease Control guidelines for refugee health screening and what I don’t get is this: refugees are domestically screened between 30 and 90 days of arrival.  How many people have interacted or come in contact with a refugee family and then don’t learn for 30 to 90 days that someone in the family has TB (or HIV or parasites or other transmittable health conditions)?

See our ‘health issues’ category with over 300 previous posts on the topic.

Posted in Changing the way we live, health issues, Refugee Resettlement Program, Taxpayer goodies, Where to find information | Tagged: , | 6 Comments »

Report crimes and terror threats to the FBI!

Posted by Ann Corcoran on July 7, 2016

See something! Say something!fbi logo

In response to our previous post, a reader (TwoLaine) sent this link for the FBI Crime and Terror Report hotline.

Maybe you should put these numbers in your phone so you have them handy!

 

General Public

Members of the public can report violations of U.S. federal law or suspected terrorism or criminal activity as follows:

Posted in Changing the way we live, Crimes, diversity's dark side, Muslim refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Stealth Jihad, Where to find information | Tagged: | 8 Comments »

If Syrians safely go home (to Syria!) today for EID, are they still legitimate refugees?

Posted by Ann Corcoran on July 5, 2016

The answer of course is NO!  Legitimate refugees are people escaping persecution of one sort or another. Economic migrants and even people staying out of war zones are NOT real refugees!

syrian border

If Syrians move back and forth across Turkish/Syrian borders, are they really persecuted refugees fearing for their lives?

I’ve been remiss in not reporting this fantastic essay by two former US asylum judges in which they define very carefully the definition of a refugee (or legitimate asylum seeker)—a definition that we believe has been intentionally perverted so that anyone in the world on-the-move is considered a refugee.

Serious students of the Refugee Admissions Program must read ‘Blurred lines: Migrant vs. Refugee’ by the Hon. Mahlon F. Hanson and Hon. Elizabeth A. Hacker posted last month at the Immigration Reform Law Institute. (Hat tip: Joanne)

Then ask yourselves, if Syrians “return home” to Syria for the holidays are they truly refugees? Or, are they economic migrants using the conflict as an excuse to move up in the world (at your expense!).

From TRT World:

Thousands of Syrian refugees in Turkey are returning home to Syria to mark the Islamic festival of Eid al Fitr which commences Tuesday.

Turkey temporarily relaxed controls at the Cilvegozu border crossing in its south-eastern province of Hatay last week, allowing Syrians with foreigner cards—those issued to refugees—to pass into northern Aleppo.

The border will remain open till 5pm local time on July 5, the start of the three-day holiday. Syrians returning to Turkey are obliged to do so before July 8 or face being barred from the country.

Turkey regularly opens the border to allow Syrians to return home for Eid holidays.

Why does the political Left and open borders aficionados on both the Left and Right want everyone to be a REFUGEE?

First because refugees are eligible for all sorts of welfare/services.  They  are free to work in the country in which they have landed, they can bring in the extended family, and they will ultimately become citizens of the countries in which the UN places them.  Why the political Right doesn’t see that they will ultimately vote the R’s (in America, in Europe the Right gets it) out of office is beyond me.  But, it seems that the Republican supporters of Open Borders see the dollar signs as the refugees are ready cheap labor for their big donors and the R’s get to wear the white hat of humanitarianism as an added bonus!

Of course there are surely larger forces than some on the American Right and Left driving the No Borders movement worldwide, but who or what is doing that is beyond my understanding!

This post is archived in our ‘immigration fraud’ category (808 previous posts) among other places.

Posted in Asylum seekers, Europe, Immigration fraud, Legal immigration and jobs, Muslim refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Where to find information, Who is going where | Tagged: , | 5 Comments »

Top posts of the last week (and miscellaneous stuff)

Posted by Ann Corcoran on June 19, 2016

rrw-logo-1Refugee Resettlement Watch is two weeks away from our 9th anniversary!

Where has the time gone? I had to laugh (sort of) just now when I looked at an early post during our first week in July 2007.  I was asking about whether it was a good idea to begin to bring in large numbers of Iraqi refugees.  Well we are now over 100,000, maybe even 150,000 Iraqis (mostly Muslims) spread out across America. (We can’t give you the exact number at the moment because I fear that the State Dept. has withdrawn their data base from public view!)

Has it all been a waste of time?

No, not at all!  I couldn’t have imagined a year ago that the word ‘refugee’ would be on the nightly news and indeed is becoming a critical Presidential election year issue.  So I hope this blog has played some role in educating you about what we are up against.

A few housekeeping issues….

I’ve had some questions lately about sharing buttons. When you subscribe to RRW, wordpress sends you an e-mail which includes the text of the post.  Many of you have asked for a place to tweet or send the text you get to facebook.  If you go to RRW itself (and I recommend that) each post has sharing buttons at the bottom so I am not sure what else I can do to facilitate your request.

Also, if you are on twitter, and so am I, know that everything I post I also tweet. So follow me @RefugeeWatcher and retweet my post if you like. (For those not on twitter, you can still see all the stories I tweet in my right hand side bar.)

making hay when the sun shines

Making hay when the sun shines and why I can’t always answer your e-mails!

For our facebook page click here.  I don’t put every post on facebook, but I do share the ones I consider most important there. Know that I have a partner at facebook who places stories as well that she thinks will interest you.

And one more thing before I get to the top three most-read posts of the week—did you send US State Dept. testimony I have not yet posted? I apologize but again my in-box is so completely jammed that I can’t find more testimony in the mess.  If you still would like your POLITE testimony published please resend it.

My e-mail address is refugeewatcher@gmail.com, but please have pity on me and don’t send me e-mails morning, noon and night on every issue facing America at the moment! I would love to chat with you all day, I just can’t or nothing would ever get written.

And, for all of the new readers especially in towns where you’ve gotten the word that the federal government is going to place refugees in your community, be sure to see our Frequently Asked Questions, here.  And, see this post which I recently re-posted: Ten things your town needs to know!

So here are the Top Three Posts of the last week:

Story about Somali woman who attacked Georgia Mom is surreal

Amarillo, TX being destroyed by refugee overload

Copenhagen: Islamic gangs intimidate bar patrons, tell them no drinking in Sharia zones

P.S. RRW is a blog, a news site, a library of sorts, not an organization with staff and interns and offices etc. etc.  You may have noticed that I finally broke down and installed a ‘donation’ button, but we are not a 501(c)3 designated non-profit, so your kind donations are not tax deductible.

Posted in blogging, Refugee Resettlement Program, Where to find information | Tagged: | 8 Comments »

Ten things your town needs to know as it is targeted for refugee resettlement

Posted by Ann Corcoran on June 7, 2016

Editor: If that title looks familiar, then you must be a long time reader.  But, it occurred to me just this morning, answering an e-mail from a reader, that since we get new followers every day and since we have now posted 7,624 articles here at RRW, that maybe re-posting some of those from time to time might be useful.

I do want to remind you that the search function here at RRW is very good, so please use it! (Upper left hand side bar) You might first search for your city or state and see if we have written about it previously.

Since the Obama Administration is in crunch time to get as many refugees (especially the Syrians) seeded into your towns as they can, I thought this post from March 2015 would be useful.

Ten things your town needs to know:

As we have been writing ad nauseam lately, the Obama Administration is now out of the shadows with its plan to “seed” towns and cities across America with diversity.

President Barack Obama, flanked by Cecilia Muñoz, director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, left, and senior White House adviser Valerie Jarrett, speaks in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, June 24, 2013, during a meeting with CEOs, business owners and entrepreneurs to discuss immigration reform. Obama hosted the meeting to discuss the importance of commonsense immigration reform including the Congressional Budget Office analysis that concludes immigration reform would promote economic growth and reduce the deficit. Sitiing next to Obama are . (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Changing America by changing the people. President Barack Obama, flanked by Cecilia Muñoz, director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, left, and senior White House adviser Valerie Jarrett are changing the people by ‘planting’ immigrant “seedlings” in towns across America!

‘Seed’ is their word!  Your community is the soil into which the migrants of all sorts (legal and illegal) are being planted according to Obama’s Task Force on New Americans.   It begs the questions:  Are we being colonized?  Do they plan to replace us some day?  Sound far-fetched?  Knowing Obama, are you willing to gamble on that?

We have long maintained a ‘fact sheet’ about how the UN/US State Department’s Refugee Admissions and Resettlement Program works, click here to learn more.

But, I realized yesterday, while thinking about the newest proposed seed community*** in Rep. Trey Gowdy’s backyard in Spartanburg, SC, that we needed a quick primer on what elected officials and citizens should know if they are being pressured to ‘welcome the stranger‘ (this guilt-tripping language is one way they pressure your town!). Update: Gowdy lost, assuming he ever tried, and Spartanburg is now an established resettlement site.

So here are my Ten Things you need to know!

1)  In most cases, the United Nations is choosing our refugees.  Topping the list right now are Iraqis, Burmese, Congolese, Somalis and Bhutanese.  The UN is pressuring the US to take a large number, 10,000 or so, Syrians.  We are bringing in refugees from countries which hate us.  Your town does not get to choose who you get!  You will receive racially, culturally and religiously diverse people, usually very different from your local population and very different from each other.  That old ‘melting pot’ concept is dead because the numbers are too high.

2)  Often the US State Department’s chosen resettlement contractor for your town, sounds like a church group, or other benign-sounding non-profit.  They may have a religious-sounding name, but know that they are being paid by the head from the federal treasury to bring refugees to your town.  It is not the case that they are passing a plate on Sunday morning to pay for this very expensive program. Here are the nine major contractors which have 350 subcontractors working for them (headquartered in over 180 cities so far).

3)  The contractor’s job is to get the refugee family their “services.”  That means they hold the refugees’ hands until they are settled usually in tax-payer subsidized housing, get them signed up for most forms of welfare including food stamps and other cash assistance, sign them up for health care and enroll the kids in school. This special class of legal immigrant is entitled to welfare!  The contractor is also paid with your tax dollars to give refugees job counseling and training.  The contractor may also be working closely with some big business (and the Chamber of Commerce) nearby which is looking for cheap labor.

4)  The contractor’s job ends in 3-6 months at which point they move on to bringing in the next fresh group of “clients,” often the relatives of the first group.  Earlier, and still struggling, refugees are left in the care of your social services department. At this point the contractors are entrenched in your town and will call you racists, rednecks and xenophobes if your citizens want to slow the flow.

5)  Your town will never get out of the program once the contractor has an office set up and staff to pay.  Many cities are trying to get out now and can’t:  Manchester, NH, Springfield and Lynn, Mass, Amarillo, TX come to mind. Because there have developed “pockets of resistance” (their words), the State Department is desperately out scouting for fresh territory.

6)  The greatest impact on your local social and economic welfare will be felt first in the school system, followed usually by the shortage of government subsidized housing.  Your school system may end up with 50 or more languages represented in the student population.  The number-one language of refugees entering the US right now is Arabic, Somali is number four. (Update: Somali has moved to number 3, here.)

7)  Refugees are permitted entry into the US with HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis among other medical problems.  Physical and mental health challenges will most likely overburden your local health department.

8)  Your local government is responsible (Clinton-era Executive Order) for providing costly interpreters for the myriad languages being spoken in the school system, the health system and the criminal justice system should problems arise.

9)  Refugees who do find work, work at entry level jobs and minimum wage so they will still be able to benefit from many welfare programs open to low-income Americans.  Elder refugees are eligible for SSI.   The refugees are Legal Permanent Residents and can begin the citizenship process quickly.

10)  If they say they are coming to your town with the first group of refugees, there is only one thing you can do!  ASK QUESTIONS IN PUBLIC.  Demand that your elected officials get involved. Demand that a community meeting be held, for the US State Department, the Office of Refugee Resettlement (in HHS), your state refugee office (if there is one) and their contractors, to answer questions from the citizens of the town or city. Get your Member of Congress and US Senators involved too!  Don’t forget your state legislators!   The State Department and its contractors HATE to answer questions!  Tell your local elected officials you want a public hearing!  Tell your elected officials that you want the federal government and its contractors to provide a plan!

You want them to answer questions such as these below. 

Remember you have every right to know what is being planned for your town.  They will bully you, call you names and say you can’t stop them anyway, but refuse to be bullied!

Demand answers (in public)!

Who is coming?  From where and how many?

Will they stop the resettlement if the town is becoming economically or socially stressed?

What security and health screening have the refugees undergone?

How many will come each year?

Who is paying for their health care?

Who is paying to educate the children who don’t speak English and may never have attended school?

Does your town have an adequate supply of government-supported housing?  Will demands for housing crowd out American elderly, poor or disabled citizens?

Where will they work?  Do we have high unemployment already?

I’m sure you can think of others.  After getting answers (good luck!) and having a vigorous public discussion, then your town can decide based on all the facts whether you will eagerly “welcome” New Americans to your community, or not.

Endnote:  There are other refugee experts in the country, so let me know if I’m missing anything here and I’ll add it!

Update!!!  Call this #11: an experienced researcher just reminded me that concerned citizens must form a citizens’ group to research the structure of the program in your state to obtain the FISCAL and legal facts about the program as the structure can vary from state to state.

*** This post (on Spartanburg) brought in the highest number of readers we have ever had for one post over a brief two days!  

An afterthought:  If you should get a public meeting/hearing be sure to educate yourselves on the Delphi Technique, a strategy often used by government agencies wishing to control the outcome of a meeting.  Go here to see what Judy said about it in advance of the public meeting held in Hagerstown, MD in September 2007.

The US State Department has said they won’t go where they are not wanted, but they are desperate now (too many refugees coming in and too few ‘welcoming’ towns) and are shoving refugees down the throats of reluctant communities, but you still mustn’t roll over and give up! You do have a right to determine the character of your community and how your tax dollars are spent, so continue to speak up.  Thank God, we aren’t Europe yet! 

As the November elections approach make this issue a top priority whenever you have an opportunity to meet candidates at all levels of government.  You can be sure if Hillary Clinton is elected President this program will never be reformed, but will be put on steroids.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, creating a movement, Obama, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Taxpayer goodies, Where to find information | Tagged: | 26 Comments »

Comment worth noting: reader wants map to show state per capita refugee arrivals

Posted by Ann Corcoran on May 30, 2016

Reader TipTipTopKek asked the following in a comment to the post last night with the map of the US .  He/she wants to know which states receive the most refugees on a per capita basis.

I would love to see these raw numbers reconfigured in two different ways:

First, as a per capita number based on the total population of the State

Second, as a per capita number based on the NON-HISPANIC WHITE population of the State

My suspicion is that, generally speaking and with Wyoming as an obvious exception, the highest RAPEfugee flows have been into the WHITEST States.

Maybe some one of you is good with numbers, I’m not, however we have previously posted the map below which shows the distribution of refugees to states on a per capita basis, but we don’t know which states are the whitest. I’m guessing the Dakotas, Nebraska, Idaho and Vermont are examples of states with large white populations and they definitely are getting more than their share of refugees.  There is no doubt there is a method to the madness—the UN/US State Dept. is seeding diversity.

 

map-refugees-distorted

What is this you ask? It is a map distorted to show which states are disproportionately receiving refugees based on their overall populations for years 2009-2012.  The number in each state is the number of refugees resettled per existing residents of the state. http://www.humanosphere.org/basics/2014/02/map-day-refugees-accepted-us-states-population-adjusted/

 

Editor: All of our ‘comments worth noting’ are archived here.

Posted in Comments worth noting/guest posts, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information, Who is going where | Tagged: | 4 Comments »

Top resettlement states in last ten years

Posted by Ann Corcoran on May 29, 2016

I was looking for something else and found this map. Don’t you just love that white hole in the middle—Wyoming!

As we have reported many times, the top states resettling refugees are Texas, California, New York, Florida and then Michigan, Illinois, Arizona and a couple of others vying for the #5 spot.

The map is for FY2006-FY2015:

 

map US top states

 

Posted in Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information | Tagged: | 5 Comments »

ORR Annual Reports to Congress are very useful

Posted by Ann Corcoran on May 17, 2016

Someone asked me today where to find the number of refugees who were resettled in each state in the US over the years and it reminded me that we have many many new readers every day who are just beginning to try to get a handle on how the UN/US State Department Refugee Admissions Program works.

Annual Report to Congress

Most recent Annual Report to Congress

Very useful documents are the Office of Refugee Resettlement Annual Reports to Congress*** which are full of all sorts of data, not just the statistics on how many refugees were resettled in your state, but they include data on welfare use, employment, housing, and medical assistance, among other things.

They also include reports from the VOLAGs (the federal contractors) and discussions of special problems that some refugee populations encounter here. And, of course there is information about the myriad grants these contractors receive each year.

I can’t say it enough, but knowledge is power.  If you want to begin to understand what is happening in your towns and cities, start by looking at one of these documents.

Click here for a list of available reports.

By the way, the Refugee Act of 1980 specifies that this report should be completed and sent to Congress by the end of January following the close of the fiscal year.  Thus, the 2015 Annual Report should be available, but they are behind in producing it.

So what else is new! At one point a few years ago, they were three years behind!

For new readers we have a category entitled ‘where to find information,’ and you might want to have a look at it from time to time.

P.S.  I just spent a few minutes examining Table 1 (of the Appendix) in the FY2009 Annual Report where it cataloged how many refugees and from what countries were resettled in each state between 1983 and 2009. Wow! Amazing!

***This is not to be confused with another report to Congress that accompanies the President’s proposal for the upcoming fiscal year.  That report also has much useful data but is not as comprehensive as the reports found here.

 

Posted in Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information | Tagged: , , , , | 12 Comments »

Top language of refugees entering the US since 2008 is still Arabic

Posted by Ann Corcoran on May 17, 2016

We previously reported on data regarding top languages of refugees here in April of last year.

This is the latest from the US State Department’s Refugee Processing Center, here.  This is data for the period from 2008 up until April 30, 2016.

Remember, these are only the languages spoken by refugees, this does not include those spoken by other categories of legal immigrants or of illegal immigrants.

 

Screenshot (36)

[If the above isn’t clear enough, this is the list: Arabic, Nepali, Somali, Sgaw Karen, Spanish, Chaldean, Burmese, Armenian, Kiswahili, other.]

We notice that since we reported a year ago, Somali has moved up to number three.  Also Kayah (a language from Burma) is off the list and Kiswahili (African language) replaces it at number 9.  I’m guessing that is because the State Department is moving ahead quickly with its proposed resettlement to your towns of 50,000 from the DR Congo.

Pay attention new refugee resettlement towns and cities!

When contemplating becoming a “welcoming” refugee community, remember you, state and local taxpayers are responsible for providing interpreters (Bill Clinton Executive Order!) for just about anything from medical treatment, problems in the school system and in the criminal justice system, etc. etc. etc.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Muslim refugees, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Stealth Jihad, Taxpayer goodies, Where to find information | Tagged: , | 14 Comments »

 
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