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Posts Tagged ‘Annual reports to Congress refugees’

More than half of refugees in US receive food stamps

Posted by Ann Corcoran on August 14, 2018

That is from a recent Center for Immigration Studies report by Jason Richwine who analyzed the most recent Office of Refugee Resettlement Annual Report to Congress.

The news comes at a time when the President is deciding how many refugees could be admitted to the US in FY19 which begins on October first.

John Binder at Breitbart penned a short piece on the CIS study entitled:

More Than Half of Foreign Refugees Are on Taxpayer-Funded Food Stamps

 

More than half of the annual inflow of foreign refugees arriving in the United States are on food stamps, a government report reveals.

Since 2008, as Breitbart News reported, the U.S. has permanently resettled more than 1.7 million foreign nationals and refugees through a variety of humanitarian programs like the Special Immigrant Juveniles and the Nicaraguan Adjustment and Central American Relief Act. This is a foreign population larger than Philadelphia, Pennsylvania — a city with more than 1.5 million residents.

An annual report by the Office of Refugee Resettlement was analyzed by the Center for Immigration Studies’ Jason Richwine, in which the analyst revealed that about 56 percent of households headed by foreign refugees who arrived in the U.S. between 2011 and 2015 are using taxpayer-funded food stamps.

Nearly 30 percent of refugees received cash welfare of some sort, while 34 percent of refugees 18-years-old or older said they had no health insurance. Of the refugees who said they did have health insurance, about 50 percent said they were either on Medicaid or Refugee Medical Assistance, both of which are taxpayer-funded.

More here.

Frankly I suspect the numbers are much worse.

The sampling used by the Office of Refugee Resettlement is tiny and dependent on how many of the refugees they can find via phone calls and how many will even participate by answering questions if they are found.

A large number are not even participating in the survey because of language barriers.

We have told you about the Annual Reports for years. Here is just one post in 2013 where we reported that food stamp use was 70% in Obama’s first year in office—2009!

Even in spite of the possible under counting in the welfare use sections, the reports are treasure troves of information for those of you trying to better understand how the refugee program works and what it might be doing to your towns and cities.

One of the things you will see in the reports is information on how many other grants and goodies the contractors receive over and above their per refugee head payment.

The US is no doubt importing poverty, something that the designers of the original Refugee Act of 1980 promised would not happen.

And, if you are saying to yourselves that new immigrants aren’t supposed to be eligible for welfare, remember that prohibition does not apply to refugees!

Below is the table from the 2016 Annual Report:

 

Screenshot (621)

SNAP is of course food stamps. Note that nearly 20% receive Social Security disability benefits—yikes!

Screenshot (622)

Next after food stamps, taxpayers fund medical care for a very large percentage of refugees.

 

Just so you know we admitted 69,933 refugees to the US in FY2015 and for the whole accounting period above (FY11 through FY15) the total was 324,508 according to data at Wrapsnet.

Cutting numbers is a good start and we applaud the President, but the whole program must be reformed.

Do it now!

Contact the White House and tell the President what you think! See contact link in right hand sidebar here at RRW.

Posted in Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Trump, What you can do, Where to find information | Tagged: , , , | 12 Comments »

ORR Annual Reports to Congress are very useful

Posted by Ann Corcoran on May 17, 2016

Someone asked me today where to find the number of refugees who were resettled in each state in the US over the years and it reminded me that we have many many new readers every day who are just beginning to try to get a handle on how the UN/US State Department Refugee Admissions Program works.

Annual Report to Congress

Most recent Annual Report to Congress

Very useful documents are the Office of Refugee Resettlement Annual Reports to Congress*** which are full of all sorts of data, not just the statistics on how many refugees were resettled in your state, but they include data on welfare use, employment, housing, and medical assistance, among other things.

They also include reports from the VOLAGs (the federal contractors) and discussions of special problems that some refugee populations encounter here. And, of course there is information about the myriad grants these contractors receive each year.

I can’t say it enough, but knowledge is power.  If you want to begin to understand what is happening in your towns and cities, start by looking at one of these documents.

Click here for a list of available reports.

By the way, the Refugee Act of 1980 specifies that this report should be completed and sent to Congress by the end of January following the close of the fiscal year.  Thus, the 2015 Annual Report should be available, but they are behind in producing it.

So what else is new! At one point a few years ago, they were three years behind!

For new readers we have a category entitled ‘where to find information,’ and you might want to have a look at it from time to time.

P.S.  I just spent a few minutes examining Table 1 (of the Appendix) in the FY2009 Annual Report where it cataloged how many refugees and from what countries were resettled in each state between 1983 and 2009. Wow! Amazing!

***This is not to be confused with another report to Congress that accompanies the President’s proposal for the upcoming fiscal year.  That report also has much useful data but is not as comprehensive as the reports found here.

 

Posted in Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information | Tagged: , , , , | 12 Comments »

Office of Refugee Resettlement finally gets around to releasing 2014 report to Congress

Posted by Ann Corcoran on March 23, 2016

Back to our daily grind (after yesterday’s record-breaking day)—working to educate you about the UN/US State Department Refugee Admissions Program….

Annual Report to Congress

Annual Report to Congress

The law says that the federal Office of Refugee Resettlement must get their Annual  Report to Congress out by January 31st of the year following the close of the fiscal year.  The fiscal year closes on September 31st, so the Annual Report for 2104 was over a year overdue when it was released a few days ago.

Their flagrant lawbreaking is nothing new and at one point a few years ago they were THREE years behind.  Until recently no one in Congress said boo!

Senator Jeff Sessions and Rep. Marsha Blackburn (and others) here in December 2015 did write to the Secretary of the Dept. of Health and Human Services demanding the 2014 report.  But, you should know that ORR is now behind (as of January 31, 2016) in producing 2015!

There are only a couple of reasons for the lawbreaking—incompetence, or they are hiding information until it is out of date.

Go here to read about the 2014 Report and follow links to the entire report. (Hat tip: Joanne) If you take the time to review it, you will see it is a treasure-trove of information for anyone wishing to learn more about how the refugee program effects you and your city (and the nation!).

Bob Carey

That is the Director of ORR Bob Carey (on right and responsible for the report) campaigning on the prevention of refugee suicides. He came over to ORR from a lucrative job as a federal resettlement contractor. Photo: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/orr/resource/national-suicide-prevention-month-social-media-campaign

I haven’t had time to open it, but the best sections are the statistics on refugee welfare use etc. (always shocking!).

Go here to see the list of annual reports going back decades.

For energetic researchers:  Do you know how the interactive data base, here, only goes back to 2002?  Well, using these reports you can go all the way back to the first one for 1980 and get statistics on who came to your state, etc.  I wrote this 2008 post on how many Somalis the US admitted every year by going back through those annual reports.

Are you a new reader?

For all of the new readers who arrived here this week, we have a category entitled ‘where to find information’ with hundreds of posts where we cataloged reports and documents and so forth.  I also recommend our fact sheet (a little out of date) and our Frequently Asked Questions both of which are linked in our header.

About the photo:  Why are refugees committing suicides?  They have found out that America’s streets are not paved with gold. Some have a very tough time transitioning to American life and they miss their culture, their homes.  I wonder if the do-gooders ever consider that they may not being doing the humanitarian thing by ripping people from their cultures so they can become the cheap labor force, for example, BIG MEAT.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information | Tagged: , , , | 5 Comments »

Senator Sessions wants Office of Refugee Resettlement to provide missing annual report

Posted by Ann Corcoran on December 5, 2015

Shaking my head, where were you guys when I needed you years ago!

Marsha+Blackburn+Jeff+Sessions+dLXpCJOWnJbm

Senator Jeff Sessions (center) and Rep. Marsha Blackburn sent a letter to HHS Secretary this week looking for ORR annual reports to Congress.

The Office of Refugee Resettlement (in HHS) is required by law to provide annual reports to Congress and for years and years we squawked about the fact that for years (years!) they were way behind.  In fact by the time I testified at a State Department hearing in 2012 they were 3 years behind.  My complaints went on for years and for awhile they were starting to catch up. (I did complain to the House immigration subcommittee too!).

I know, I’m grateful that the Congress is finally scrutinizing the UN/US State Department Refugee Admissions Program, but it was lonely there for awhile!

Here is Leo Hohmann at WND yesterday on the latest from Senator Sessions and others:

Several GOP members of Congress led by U.S. Sens. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., have placed the Obama administration on notice that it is in violation of federal law with regard to the program that resettles foreign refugees in 180 U.S. cities and towns.

Sessions, along with Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., and Reps. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., and Lamar Smith, R-Texas, released a letter Thursday that was sent the previous day to Obama’s secretary of Health and Human Services, Sylvia Burwell.

The Obama administration has said it will resettle 85,000 foreign refugees in the U.S. in the current fiscal year, followed by 100,000 in the next year. It has also asked for a substantial increase in funding for the program.

But the law requires annual reports on how those resettlements are carried out.

“Failure to provide Congress with required information on the resettlement of foreign nationals within the United States violates both the law and the public trust,” Sessions said in a statement. “These are grave matters.”

The letter accuses the administration of violating federal law by failing to submit an annual report to Congress on the activities of the Office of Refugee Resettlement, which operates within Burwell’s department and doles out welfare benefits to refugees.

Continue reading here.

A trip down memory lane…..

Limon testifying

In 2013, my research indicated that those annual reports to Congress began going off track during the tenure of Lavinia Limon as Director of the ORR under Bill Clinton. Today Limon heads up one of the resettlement contracting agencies—USCRI.

This is what I said in 2012 at a US State Department scoping meeting (Ten Reasons there should be a moratorium on refugee resettlement):

5)     The agencies, specifically the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR), is in complete disarray as regards its legally mandated requirement to report to Congress every year on how refugees are doing and where the millions of tax dollars are going that run the programThe last (and most recent) annual report to be sent to Congress is the 2008 report—so they are out of compliance for fiscal years 2009, 2010 and 2011.  A moratorium is necessary in order for the ORR to bring its records entirely up-to-date. Additionally,  there needs to be an adequate tracking system designed to gather required data—frankly some of the numbers reported for such measures of dependence on welfare as food stamp usage, cash assistance and employment status are nothing more than guesses.  (The lack of reports for recent years signals either bureaucratic incompetence and disregard for the law, or, causes one to wonder if there is something ORR is hiding.)

You might want to visit all of my ten reasons for a moratorium because they are as valid today as they were in 2012!

In 2013…..

I did further analysis of the annual reports and if they were sent to Congress according to law (here in March of 2013) and this is what I found:

My original plan was to start researching at 1990 and move toward the present time to see when they went off track and began breaking the law.  It didn’t take long—1993!

So, I went back to 1980 and sure enough through the entire Reagan Presidency and the George HW Bush Presidency from 1980 to 1992 those Annual Reports were right on time—submitted to Congress on January 31st of the following year.

But, you know what the little cheaters did beginning with the 1993 report (and continued to do for the next 20 years)—they stopped putting publication dates on them.  Oh, they had FY 1993 on the cover, but no information about when that actually went to Congress—heck it could have been three years late then!

So, who was the Director of the ORR during Bill Clinton’s time in office? 

Lavinia Limon who now heads up one of the nine major federal contractors—the US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants—was in charge of getting those reports to Congress.

For all of you especially in ‘Pockets of Resistance’ check out the annual reports (the list is here).  They are a treasure-trove of information on the program.

Update: Re-posted my Ten reasons, here.

 

Posted in Changing the way we live, Colonization, Community destabilization, Reforms needed, Refugee Resettlement Program, Where to find information | Tagged: , | 4 Comments »

How to find those darn numbers! Found it! 7,600 Somalis to America in 2013

Posted by Ann Corcoran on September 7, 2014

Update: Almost 1,000 additional Somalis admitted to the US in the past month, here. The number for FY2014 is now 8,278.

Almost every day someone asks us—where do I find numbers for this group of refugees admitted to the US, or that group.  Let me tell you it isn’t easy!

This morning I was on the hunt for how many Somalis we admitted to the US in fiscal year 2013.

Eskinder Negash (right) Director of ORR and Larry Bartlett (left) Director of Refugee Admissions of the US State Department addressing an audience in “welcoming” Portland, Maine. Maine is a Somali resettlement site. http://www.pressherald.com/2013/01/30/growth-of-refugee-community-attributed-to-welcoming-city_2013-01-30/

We know that for fiscal year 2014, through July 31st (in ten months), we have admitted 7,326.  You can always check this site at WRAPSnet.org for the on-going resettlement in a given year.

Update: Here in Statistical Abstracts you can learn about how many refugees/asylees etc. came to your state in FY2013.

The handiest place for all numbers is the Office of Refugee Resettlement’s Annual Reports to Congress, here.  However, since they are always behind in producing those, the most recent numbers are not available to us or to Congress.  The numbers are in tables at the end of each report.

Another good source is the Annual Flow Reports from the Department of Homeland Security.  Here is one for 2012.

You can find some information at the Migration Policy Institute (a pro-immigration ‘think tank’), here.

Then there is the massive data base at Homeland Security’s Yearbook of Immigration Statistics, here.

Where did I finally find the number I was looking for?

I found it in the text of a year-end wrap-up which we previously posted by the Director of the Office of Refugee Resettlement, Eskinder Negash, who said this on December 20, 2013 (posted here for the benefit of our new readers).  Emphasis is mine:

Two thousand thirteen was another busy year for the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR).  Despite an extended moratorium on overseas refugee arrivals in October, Fiscal Year 2013 brought fairly steady arrivals each month, across all categories.

The largest group was refugees, with the United States welcoming refugees from 65 countries across the globe this past year. The highest number of overseas arrivals represented a slight switch from those of the past few years, with nearly 19,500 Iraqi refugee admissions and 16,300 Burmese refugees accounting for more than half of all refugee arrivals.  They were followed by Bhutanese (9,100), Somali (7,600) and Cuban refugees (4,200), with Iran, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan, Eritrea and Ethiopia rounding out rest of the top ten admissions groups in FY2013.

The overall population served by ORR and its partners, however, grew to a projected 143,000 new arrivals in Fiscal Year 2013, including almost 72,000 refugees and Special Immigrant Visa holders, an estimated 46,000 asylees and Cuban/Haitian Entrants and Parolees; more than 500 Victims of Trafficking, and nearly 25,000 Unaccompanied Alien Children (UAC). 

Negash:  The best news!  They are voting!

The numbers only tell part of the story: most of the 143,000 people ORR served last year are on a path to U.S. citizenship that began the day they arrived.  Former refugees, asylees, and UAC are making positive changes in communities across the country—and will continue to do so throughout their lives—opening businesses, buying homes and raising families, and voting (and running!) in local elections.  Three former refugees ran for public office in multi-cultural Clarkston, Georgia this past November—and for the first time in the city’s history, voters elected a refugee to a seat on the City Council.

Read it all.

We have two categories, now very full, to help you find reports, documents, statistics etc.  One is ‘Where to find information’ and the other isRefugee statistics.’

See also one of our most read posts from the last seven years,  ‘How did we get so many Somali refugees…’ I put those numbers together by poring over each annual report that had become available.  By the way, keep in mind that most Somalis in the US today came as refugees or are the children of refugees.

Posted in Africa, Refugee Resettlement Program, Refugee statistics, Where to find information | Tagged: , , | 5 Comments »

Has your city been chosen as a “preferred” resettlement site?

Posted by Ann Corcoran on March 16, 2014

Savannah, GA: Hot new resettlement site when Atlanta suburbs went into overload? Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Services benefited from federal grant for Savannah!

As I mentioned, I took some reading material with me when I was away last week and had a chance to make this list of “preferred communities” from the 2010 Annual Report to Congress from the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) in the Department of Health and Human Services.

According to the feds, a”preferred community” is one in which newly arriving refugees have the best opportunity for “self-sufficiency and integration.”  I look at the list and know that many of these cities are having big problems with refugees/immigrant joblessness and poverty, and lack of integration (assimilation!).

The grants for 2010 totaled nearly $6 million.  And, take note Wyoming, the grants did not go to the city or state, the grants went to the contractors, so they decide what is needed to smooth the way for refugees in your “welcoming” city! 

It strikes me that this is just one more excuse to funnel your tax dollars to a contractor.

Below are the cities that were “preferred” for both continuation grants and new grants in 2010 (from 2010 Annual Report).  Since my return I see that the Annual Report for 2011 is out, so I’ve added those cities in red.  Keep in mind that the ORR is always late in producing these reports, so by 2012 and 2013 surely they have added new cities to their “preferred communities.”

***Again, cities in red were added in 2011. This list gives you an idea of the cities being overloaded and that problems have developed.***

Bet you didn’t know your city was “preferred!”

Arizona:  Tuscon, Phoenix

California:  San Diego, Sacramento, Modesto, Walnut Creek

Colorado:  Denver, Greeley, Ft. Collins, Loveland

Connecticut:  Derby/Bridgeport, New Haven

District of Columbia

Florida:  Orlando, Clearwater

Georgia:  Atlanta, Savannah

Idaho:  Boise, Twin Falls, Treasure Valley

Illinois:  Chicago, Dupage/Aurora, Moline

Indiana:  Indianapolis

Iowa:  Des Moines

Kentucky:  Louisville, Lexington, Owensboro

Maryland:  Baltimore, Silver Spring

Massachusetts:  Springfield, Jamaica Plain, Worcester

Michigan:  Dearborn, Ann Arbor

Minnesota:  Minneapolis, St. Cloud, St. Paul

Missouri:  Kansas City

Nebraska:  Omaha

Nevada:  Las Vegas

New Hampshire:  Manchester, Concord

New Jersey:  East Orange

New Mexico: Albuquerque

New York:  Syracuse, Buffalo, Utica, Albany

North Carolina: Raleigh, New Bern, Wilmington, Durham, High Point, Charlotte, Greensboro (lucky NC!)

Ohio: Cleveland, Columbus, Akron

Pennsylvania:  Lancaster, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Erie

Rhode Island:  Providence

Tennessee: Nashville, Knoxville

Texas:  Fort Worth, Houston, Austin

Virginia:  Charlottesville

Washington:  Seattle, Richland

Wisconsin: Milwaukee, Madison

This was so much fun, I’ll see if I can find more recently designated “preferred” cities!

Today’s post is archived in our ‘where to find information’ category.

***Update***  Here you can see a list of new grantees. Note that the US Conference of Catholic Bishops gets nearly $2 million through 2016 for preferred communities, but no specific sites are listed (they probably don’t want you to know that your city is among the chosen!).

Posted in Changing the way we live, Community destabilization, Refugee Resettlement Program, Resettlement cities, Taxpayer goodies, Where to find information | Tagged: , , | 13 Comments »

ORR Annual Report to Congress for 2011 is now available

Posted by Ann Corcoran on March 15, 2014

They are still breaking the law since the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) was required in the original Refugee Act of 1980 to produce an annual report four months after the close of the previous fiscal year.  So technically ORR should, by now, have submitted reports for 2012 and 2013.

Eskinder Negash (right) is the Director of the Office of Refugee Resettlement. Previously he was a VP for one of the contractors. Revolving door between contractor and government job is standard operating proceduere in this program.

As we reported here, they have been behind ever since the Clinton Administration.

I hadn’t been checking, so I don’t know when they submitted 2011 to Congress because as you see they have no date on the cover (another trick that began during the Clinton Administration!).

For those of you in Wyoming considering inviting refugees to your state, please read the annual report before you make that move!

Wouldn’t you think that the federal government and its contractor partners would have a good handle on employment and welfare usage by refugees.  They really don’t.

Much of the information in the report is obtained through surveys where another contractor tries to track down refugees and expects them to answer truthfully about what they are receiving from welfare and if they are working.   So when you read some of the stats in the report (which are really pretty awful as it is) consider this information on how the survey is done (emphasis is mine):

For the 2011 survey, 2,514 households were contacted and 1,534 households completed the interview. Refugees included in the 2010 survey—but had not resided in the U.S. for more than five years—were again contacted and interviewed along with a new sample of refugees, Amerasians, and entrants who had arrived during the period from May 1, 2010 through April 30, 2011. Of the 1,509 re-interview cases from the 2011 sample, 954 were contacted and interviewed, and 37 were contacted, but refused to be interviewed. The remaining 518 re-interview cases could not be traced in time to be interviewed. Of the 1,005 new sample cases, 580 were contacted and interviewed, another 22 were contacted but refused to cooperate, and the remaining 403 could not be traced in time to be interviewed. [So 403 fairly new arrivals couldn’t even be found?—ed] The resulting responses were then weighted to adjust for differential sampling rates and response rates across refugee cohorts and ethnic groups.

The overall response rate of the 2011 Survey was 61 percent.

Then get this from a footnote on welfare use:

Caution must be exercised when reviewing refugee declarations of public assistance utilization. These are self reported data and the questions asked are subject to wide variation in interpretation by the respondent.

The surveys are conducted in the refugee’s native language, and certain technical terms which distinguish types of income do not translate well into foreign languages.

Refugees readily admit to receiving “welfare” or “assistance”, but they are frequently confused about the correct category. Past surveys have found that refugee households are very accurate in reporting Supplemental Security Income (SSI) because their claims are handled by the Social Security Administration.

However, RCA, TANF,and GA cases are all handled by the local county welfare office and are not clearly distinguished from each other by the refugee family.  [Note to Wyoming:  you think this is all going to be taken care of by the feds with no cost to your counties—ed]

Over the years, we have noted that many refugees claim RCA many years after arrival even though the program is confined to the first eight months in the U.S., claim receipt of TANF even though they have no children, or claim receipt of general relief even though they reside in States that do not provide such assistance, such as Florida or Texas.

So, considering all of that above, here is the “Economic Adjustment” section of the Executive Summary (emphasis is mine).  My suspicion is that the numbers are much worse than portrayed here due to the small sample size and the large number unwilling to participate or were not found.

• The 2011 Annual Survey of Refugees who have been in the U.S. less than five years indicated that 52 percent of refugees age 16 or over were employed as of December 2011, as compared with 59 percent for the U.S. population.

• The labor force participation rate was 63 percent for the sampled refugee population, as compared with 64 percent for the U.S. population. The refugee unemployment rate was 18 percent,*** compared with eight percent for the U.S. population.

• Approximately 58 percent of all sampled refugee households in the 2011 survey were entirely self-sufficient (subsisted on earnings alone). About 28 percent lived on a combination of public assistance and earned income; another nine percent received only public assistance. [This doesn’t equal 100%—ed]

Approximately eight percent of refugees in the five-year sample population received medical coverage through an employer, while 48 percent received benefits from Medicaid or Refugee Medical Assistance. About 40 percent of the sample population had no medical coverage in any of the previous 12 months.

Approximately 39 percent of respondents received some type of cash assistance in the twelve months prior to the survey. About 61 percent of refugee households received assistance through Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and 24 percent received housing assistance.

The overall hourly wage of employed refugees in the five-year population in the 2011 survey was $9.43. This represents a five percent drop from the 2010 survey, when respondents reported an overall hourly wage of $9.90 in current dollars (not adjusted for inflation).

***Think about it—18% unemployment rate for refugees and these same contractors are lobbying for amnesty for millions of illegal aliens, what will that do to refugee unemployment?

Of the nearly a half million refugees, asylees, Cuban-Haitians etc. we resettled in the last 5 years, this information was extracted from approximately 1,500 WILLING TO BE INTERVIEWED refugees.

While I was away, I was able to do a lot of reading, so this will be the first of many reports on documents I’ve been reviewing and this post and others will be filed in our ‘where to find information’ category, here.

Posted in Changing the way we live, Refugee Resettlement Program, Taxpayer goodies, Where to find information | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

2009 Annual Report to Congress is now available

Posted by Ann Corcoran on February 26, 2013

I was just looking for statistics on Afghan refugees coming to the US in large numbers (for years) because of a post I’m writing about Pakistan wanting them OUT of their country when I came across the existence of the missing 2009 ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS on the refugee program.

Here it is!

Now we can see what the program looked like in the first year of the Obama presidency.

The Office of Refugee Resettlement needs to now get cracking on reports for 2010, 2011, and 2012 which they are still LEGALLY required to produce and are breaking federal law every day by not producing them!

I won’t have time to scan the 181 pages chock full of information about how much this program is costing the taxpayer today, but look forward to reading it soon!

Posted in Obama, Refugee Resettlement Program, Where to find information | Tagged: , , | 4 Comments »

Magical mystery tour: finding the annual reports to Congress

Posted by Ann Corcoran on December 5, 2012

One of the goals of Refugee Resettlement Watch is to help you, the average taxpaying American, find the information on this program—which “refugees” are coming, from what country, to which states, and how much all this costs us (among other things).  To that end we have a category entitled “where to find information.”

On Monday, I mentioned that I would like to see how many Iraqis we have resettled over the years, first the ones we resettled because of Saddam Hussein the crazy and cruel dictator, and now the ones we are resettling because the crazy, cruel dictator is gone and they have a democracy from which “refugees” wish to escape.  We can always find an excuse to import the masses.

So, I went to the Office of Refugee Resettlement website to see the annual reports to Congress and lo-and-behold some of them were missing (and not just the three recent ones where the ORR is breaking the law by not reporting).

I then wrote to ORR to ask where they are and am told they are at a Georgetown University Law Library website.  I’m sure the average interested citizen should have been able to find that easily (not!).

If you are at all interested in who has come to your state and how much this all costs, please visit these annual reports.  Go to tables at the end to see stats on states, refugee nationalities and numbers of refugees and asylees resettled in your states.

One final thing—drum roll please!  The annual report to Congress for 2009 (three years late) is in the review process and should be out soon we are told!

Posted in Refugee Resettlement Program, Where to find information | Tagged: , , , | Comments Off on Magical mystery tour: finding the annual reports to Congress

 
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